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This is the Chinese miracle?: CANNIBALISM AND CHINA The American journalist, Jasper Becker, in a recent book, "The Revolution of Hunger. China 1958-1962: Secret Famine." Il Saggiatore. Milan 1998, who by describing cases of cannibalism, which occurred during the "great famine" caused by the insane policy of the collectivist, Mao-Tse-Tung, makes an unexpected admission about cannibalism in Chinese history. «In China – Becker says – the consumption of human flesh was not confined to periods of famine; indeed, a study on the subject concluded that cannibalism occupies special position in Chinese culture. The American aca- demic, Kay Ray Chong, has found numerous references in literature, historical documents and in Chinese medical texts, in a study entitled: "Cannibalism in China" (Long- wood Academic, Wakefield, 1990). In many periods of Chinese history, human flesh was considered a delicacy. The writer, Dao Qingyi, (Yuan Dynasty) recommends the flesh of children as an excellent dish. Chinese literature abounds with tales of cannibalism Cannibalism: A Perfectly Natural History Book by Bill Schutt Battle of Suiyang In total, Chong's exhaustive research efforts yielded 153 and 177 Part of the An Shi Rebellion incidents of war-related and natural disaster-related cannibalism, respectively. With no statistical difference in the numbers reported from the Han Dynasty (206 BCE-220 CE) to the Ch'ing Dynasty (1644-1912), incidents of cannibalism (in which varying numbers of people were consumed) seem to have been a fairly consistent occurrence throughout China's long history-until recently, that is. But rather than the decrease in reports of cannibalism one might expect to find in modern times, the opposite turns out to be true. The greatest number of cannibalism-related deaths in China practiced for pleasure. At the time of the Ming Dynasty, some eunuchs tried to came as a direct result of Mao Zedong's "The Great Leap Forward" Suiyang was in modern day Shanggiu, Henan regain During the uprising of Tai Ping (1850-1864), both parties in the conflict were eating the hearts of prisoners. The Chinese soldiers stationed in Taiwan, before the Sino- Japanese War (1894-1895), bought at the market the (1958-1961), a disastrous attempt at utopian engineering. manhood by eating human brains. Date 757 AD Location Suiyang, Xingyang Pyrrhic Yan tactical victory Result Scholar Key Ray Chong wrote that the first documented use Decisive Tang strategic victory Turn of the tide of the rebellion against of organs and human flesh to cure diseases in China took place flesh of the local inhabitants and ate it. the Yan Dynasty. during the Later Han period (25-220 CE) and that medicinal cannibalism became increasingly popular beginning in the Tang The history is replete with examples of kings and emper- ors that killed and then Yan forces fail to conquer lands south of Territorial their enemies. changes the Yangtze River. Cannibalism is also a form of revenge recommended by Confucius, according to whom it was not sufficient to observe mourning for a murdered parent; even killing wasn't sufficient. The enemies were eaten entirely - bones, flesh, heart and liver included. In the 19th century, the scenery had not changed much. James Dyer Ball in "Things Chinese" tells what happened in the conflict on water rights in 1895. After several armed clashes, the soldier's prisoners were killed. Then the Belligerents Dynasty (618-907 CE), when it became associated with filial piety. Tang Dynasty Yan Dynasty By the end of the Ch'ing Dynasty (1644-1912), Western missionary doctors were reporting that the Chinese medical treatments in- Commanders and leaders Zhang Xun Nan Jiyun Li Tingwang cluded the consumption of "the gall bladder, bones, hair, toes and fingernails, heart and liver." Thomas Chen, a pathology professor at Yang Chaozong Yin Zigi Xu Yuan Strength the New Jersey Medical School, tells us that "nail, hair, skin, milk, 10,000 150,000 urine, urine sediments, gall, placenta and even flesh" were used in Casualties and losses hearts and livers were divided and eaten. 9,600 soldier deaths China for a variety of medicinal purposes. 60,000 soldier deaths Throughout Chinese history, cannibalism was also ex- tremely common in wartime. Not only was it the last re- sort for the inhabitants of the besieged within the city or fortresses, but the same prisoners of war or enemies 20,000-30,000 civilians were eaten Follows the Battle of Yonggiu It is under the banner of learned cannibalism that the Chinese appear to have exhibited attitudes toward cannibalism that differed killed often became the main source of nourishment. The traitors were cut into pieces and put in brine; in some cases, the winner of a battle forced the enemy to drink a broth made of the body of their father or son» (Jasper Becker," op. cit., "pp. 183-184). significantly from the Western taboos. For a start, author Key Ray Chong provided a list of circumstances that might lead to an act of learned cannibalism. These were "hate, love, loyalty, filial piety, desire for human flesh as a delicacy, punishment, war, belief in the medical benefits of cannibalism, profit, insanity, coercion, religion, and su- My dear Mrs. Budd, perstition." Some of these, Chong asserted, were uniquely Chinese. As anyone who has ever visited China (or to a lesser extent, any In 1894 a friend of mine shipped as a deck hand on the Steamer Tacoma, Capt. John Davis. They sailed from San Francisco for Hong Kong China. On arriving there he and two others went ashore and got drunk. When they returned the boat was gone. big-city Chinatown) can attest, the Chinese consume a diverse range of creatures and their parts. Many of these, like scorpions and chicken testicles, fall outside the range of typical Western diets and, as writer Maggie Kilgore pointed out in 1998, some, like rats, snakes, shellfish, and things with paws, are specifically banned by Judeo-Christian law. Without our long list of forbidden foods, it's At that time there was a famine in China. Meat of any kind was from $1 to 3 Dollars a pound. So great was the suffering among the very poor that all children under 12 were sold to the Butchers to be cut up and sold for food in order to keep others from starving. A boy or girl under 14 was not safe in the street. You could go to any shop and ask for steak-chops-or stew meat. Part of the naked body of a boy or girl would be brought out and just what you wanted cut from it. A boy or girls behind which is the sweetest part of the body and sold as veal cutlet brought the highest price. not a surprise that the Chinese felt less strongly about consuming other humans. Throughout their long history, body parts were such import- ant ingredients in Chinese cuisine that Key Ray Chong devoted a 13-page chapter to "Methods of Cooking Human Flesh" with a sub- heading entitled "Baking, Roasting, Broiling, Smoke-drying, and Sun-drying." And rather than an emergency ration consumed as a last resort, there are many reports of exotic human-based dishes prepared for royalty and upper-class citizens. T'ao Tsung-yi, a writer during the Yuan Dynasty (1271-1368), wrote that "children's meat was the best food of all in taste" followed by women and then men. In Shui Hu Chuan (The Tales of Water Margins), a novel written in China the 12th century, there are numerous references to steamed dump- Cannibalism is documented to have occurred in China during the Great Leap Forward, lings stuffed with minced human flesh, as well as a rather nonchalant when rural China was hit hard by drought and famine (135)[136][137][138]|139)|140] regard by merchants and customers over the sale of human meat. During Mao Zedong's Cultural Revolution, local governments' documents revealed hundreds of Even if epicurean cannibalism isn't limited to the Chinese, the incidents of cannibalism for ideological reasons. Public events for cannibalism were extent to which it was set down in detail certainly was. Amidst in- organised by local Communist Party officials, and people took part in them formation on "five regional cuisines" (Szechwan, Canton, Fukien, together in order to prove their revolutionary passion.141)[142] The writer Zheng Yi documented Shantung, and Honon), the San Kuo Yen Ki (Dramatic Epic of the incidents of cannibalism in Guangxi province in 1968 in his 1993 book, Three Kingdoms), written in 1494, contained "many examples of Scarlet Memorial: Tales Of Cannibalism In Moderm China 143] steaming or boiling human meat." Prisoners of war were preferred ingredients, but when they ran out (figuratively or literally), Gen- eral Chu Ts'an's soldiers seized women and children off the street, killed them, and then ate them. As recently as the 19th century, executioners reportedly ate the hearts and brains of the prisoners they executed, selling whatever cuts were left to the public. Who knows that two history facts about Chinese cannibalism? Widespread epicurean cannibalism was still taking place in the late 1960s during the Cultural Revolution, although there was cer- 1)One Chinese rich man invited his friend to eat his servants (2 young boys). tainly an element of terror involved. Chinese dissident journalist Zheng Yi wrote the following in 2001: Then the other invited his friend to eat his female servant. I think it happened in the Chinese Sui Empire. 2) And In Chinese Ming Empire, Chinese people openly eat human fresh in restaurants. Once victims had been subjected to criticism, they were cut open They sold living persons to restaurants for eating. Such poor people were called as "cairen". alive, and all their body parts-heart, liver, gallbladder, kidneys, elbows, feet, tendons, intestines-were boiled, barbecued, or stir- fried into a gourmet cuisine. On campuses, in hospitals, in the canteens of various governmental units at the brigade, township, district, and country levels, the smoke from cooking pots could be seen in the air. Feasts of human flesh, at which people celebrated by drinking and gambling, were a common sight. This is the Chinese miracle?
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Highs fives and no regrets.: 735 My surgeon laughed at my reaction to a pregnancy test. HUMOR Last month I had my gallbladder removed laproscopicly. (I'm doing great now and the surgery went well and the recovery was pretty easy.) Per hospital policy before they would take me back they had me pee in a cup for a pregnancy test. I knew it would come back negative because I have health issues that make it nearly impossible and on top of that my husband and I are insanely careful. I'm in my hospital gown, Ⅳ in, and and almost ready to roll into surgery when they tell me the lab is just a little behind on the testing. No biggie. I'm a little nervous but my husband is with me and I tend to crack jokes when I'm nervous. So everyone's in pretty good spirits. The surgeon comes back to check in and answer any last minute questions when a nurse pops in and says, "Just in case you're curious, you're not pregnant." I instantly woot and go, "Hell yeah! Only thing that's going to be inside my body today is you, Doc!" Then I look at my husband (who was nervous for me and being very quiet) and go, "Up top, brah!" I give him the frat-broiest high five. Loud slap and everything. My surgeon is dying and the nurse looks a little stunned. My husband looks equal parts amused and unsure of what to do. (he's super introverted) The anesthesiologist gave me another high five. We were giggling the whole way while they wheeled me to the OR. When I went in for my first post op check up, I was asked if I was the patient who joked around and high fived the doctor. I guess the story got around fast and I now have a reputation at the hospital for my humor. I have no regrets. Highs fives and no regrets.

Highs fives and no regrets.

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