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srsfunny:Reply From Canadian Doctor: Canadian Dr.'s reply to companies requiring medical note after sick day... Dater: Ou Dear Employer: An employee of your company visited my office/emergency room for the purpose of obtaining a medical note to satisfy your company s absenteeism policy This request is a non-insured service, not funded by Medical Servic Insurance As a business operator in Nova scotia, I am asking for your support in elping to alleviate an unnecessary pressure on the health-care system.I hoping you wil] consider rvisiting your current absenteeism policy, and remove the requirement for your employees to obtain a medical note for missed time from work This policy creates an unnecessary burden on the health-care system and also exposes seriously 111 patients in my office to viruses that could cause detrimental consequences to their health. In most cases, the best remedy for a patient with an isolated illness (i.e., gastrointestinal virus or common cold) is to stay home, rest and drink fluids. Coming to a doctor's office or an emergency room for a medical note does not complement their recovery If, for whatever reason, your business decides to continue to require a physician to authorize their employees absenteeism, I wil1 require your employee to bring with them a written request from the organization for th medical note. Upon providing the service I will invoice your company 520.00per medical, note. This is a standard practice when providing non- medical necessary services for third-party organizations As Canadians we are lucky to have our health-care system, but the ability to access its services in a timely fashion is a growing problem. Health-care providers, business operators, governments and individuals all have a role to play to ensure its sustainabflity hope your business will consider changing your current absenteeism policy and therefore contribute to reducing the unnecessary burden on our health-care system and improve access for other Nova Scotians. Sincerely srsfunny:Reply From Canadian Doctor

srsfunny:Reply From Canadian Doctor

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Barack Obama Calls Republicans' Attempt to Repeal Affordable Care Act, "Aggravating"-blogged by @thereal__bee ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ When it comes to the current state of the country, many of us try to remain optimistic. But recently, even former president BarackObama had to admit how fed up he is with some of these issues. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ On Wednesday, Obama spoke during a ceremony held by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation about the Republicans’ recent attempts to repeal the Affordable Care Act. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ “When I see people trying to undo that hard-earned progress for the 50th or 60th time, with bills that would raise costs or reduce coverage, or roll back protections for older Americans or people with pre-existing conditions … for whom coverage would, once again, be almost unobtainable, it is aggravating,” Obama said. “And all of this being done without any demonstrable economic or actuarial or plain common-sense rationale, it frustrates me.” ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ “And it’s certainly frustrating to have to mobilize every couple of months to keep our leaders from inflicting real human suffering on our constituents, but typically that’s how progress is won and how progress is maintained,” he continued. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ The GOP Congress is not backing down when it comes to this issue though. They are currently trying to pass a bill proposed by Sens. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) and Bill Cassidy (R-La.). The proposal is intended to repeal and replace the ACA with a new health care system that would be detrimental to millions, especially those with serious medical illnesses. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ What do you think about Obama's statement?: Barack Obama Calls Republicans' Attempt to Repeal Affordable Care Act, "Aggravating @balleralert Barack Obama Calls Republicans' Attempt to Repeal Affordable Care Act, "Aggravating"-blogged by @thereal__bee ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ When it comes to the current state of the country, many of us try to remain optimistic. But recently, even former president BarackObama had to admit how fed up he is with some of these issues. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ On Wednesday, Obama spoke during a ceremony held by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation about the Republicans’ recent attempts to repeal the Affordable Care Act. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ “When I see people trying to undo that hard-earned progress for the 50th or 60th time, with bills that would raise costs or reduce coverage, or roll back protections for older Americans or people with pre-existing conditions … for whom coverage would, once again, be almost unobtainable, it is aggravating,” Obama said. “And all of this being done without any demonstrable economic or actuarial or plain common-sense rationale, it frustrates me.” ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ “And it’s certainly frustrating to have to mobilize every couple of months to keep our leaders from inflicting real human suffering on our constituents, but typically that’s how progress is won and how progress is maintained,” he continued. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ The GOP Congress is not backing down when it comes to this issue though. They are currently trying to pass a bill proposed by Sens. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) and Bill Cassidy (R-La.). The proposal is intended to repeal and replace the ACA with a new health care system that would be detrimental to millions, especially those with serious medical illnesses. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ What do you think about Obama's statement?

Barack Obama Calls Republicans' Attempt to Repeal Affordable Care Act, "Aggravating"-blogged by @thereal__bee ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ When it comes...

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<p><a href="http://redbloodedamerica.tumblr.com/post/165630900777/bushmeat-said-when-they-tell-you-how-ghastly" class="tumblr_blog">redbloodedamerica</a>:</p> <blockquote><p><a href="http://bushmeat.tumblr.com/" title="bushmeat">bushmeat</a> said:</p><blockquote><p>When they tell you how ghastly socialised healthcare is, remember what they are saying is absolute bullshit <a href="http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-40608253">http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-40608253</a></p></blockquote><p>If I had a nickel every time some leftist moron linked to a World Healthcare Organization or Commonwealth Fund study, well, I would have a shitload of nickels.</p><p>Since my previous source’s website is currently down–<a href="http://redbloodedamerica.tumblr.com/post/142352613032/that-red-guy-montypla-weaselwonderworld">which I’ve used in the past</a> to slap this idiotic notion that other countries’ healthcare systems are somehow superior the US’s private system–I’ll instead point to this <a href="https://object.cato.org/pubs/pas/pa654.pdf">other great explanation</a> by the folks over at CATO on why this pathetic claim is always made by these left-wing think-tanks:</p><blockquote><p><i> The debate over how to reform America’s health care sector often involves comparisons between the United States and other countries, and with good reason. Looking at other countries can help us learn which policies, if any, to emulate, and which to avoid. </i></p><p><i>There have been many attempts at international health care system comparisons.Among the most influential are the World Health Report 2000 published by the World Health Organization, several studies published by the Commonwealth Fund, and individual measures such as infant mortality and “mortality amenable to health care.” Generally in these studies, the United States performs poorly in comparison to Europe, Australia, and Japan. Therefore, scholars often use the studies to argue for adding even more government regulations to our already highly regulated health care system. </i></p><p><i>However, these studies suffer from several problems. First, they often rely on unadjusted aggregate data—such as life expectancy, or mortality from heart disease—that can be affected by many non–health care factors, including nutrition, exercise, and even crime rates. Second,they often use process measures, such as how many patients have received a pap smear or mammogram in the past three years. Process measures tell us what doctors do, but provide only an indirect measure of doctors’ productivity. Third, some of these studies inappropriately incorporate their own biases about financing in their statistics, which makes market-driven health systems appear worse even if their outcomes are similar or better. </i></p><p><i>An additional limitation of these studies is the omission of any measure of innovation. None of the best-known studies factor in the contribution of various countries to the advances that have come to characterize the current practice of health care in the developed world. </i></p><p><i>Every single health care test or treatment must be invented at some point. We would be living in a different world today were it not for the remarkable genius and hard work of health care inventors in the past, as well as investments from government health agencies and pharmaceutical and medical device companies. The health care issues commonly considered most important today—controlling costs and covering the uninsured— arguably should be regarded as secondary to innovation, inasmuch as a treatment must first be invented before its costs can be reduced and its use extended to everyone. </i><br/></p></blockquote><p>Furthermore, from another Glen Whitman <a href="https://object.cato.org/sites/cato.org/files/pubs/pdf/bp101.pdf">article</a>:</p><blockquote><p><i> Those who cite the WHO rankings typically present them as an objective measure of the relative performance of national health care systems. They are not. The WHO rankings depend crucially on a number of underlying assumptions- some of them logically incoherent, some characterized by substantial uncertainty, and some rooted in ideological beliefs and values that not everyone shares. <br/></i></p><p><i> The WHO health care rankings result from an index of health-related statistics. As with any index, it is important to consider how it was constructed, as the construction affects the results. </i><br/></p><p><i> There is good reason to account for the quality of care received by a country’s worst-off or poorest citizens. Yet the Health Distribution and Responsiveness Distribution factors do not do that.Instead, they measure relative differences in quality, without regard to the absolute level of quality. To account for the quality of care received by the worst-off, the index could include a factor that measures health among the poor, or a health care system’s responsiveness to the poor. This would, in essence, give greater weight to the well-being of the worst off.  Alternatively, a separate health performance index could be constructed for poor households or members of disadvantaged minorities. These approaches would surely have problems of their own, but they would at least be focused on the absolute level of health care quality, which should be the paramount concern. <br/></i></p><p><i> The WHO rankings, by purporting to measure the efficacy of health care systems, implicitly take all differences in health outcomes not explained by spending or literacy and attribute them entirely to health care system performance. Nothing else, from tobacco use to nutrition to sheer luck, is taken into account. </i></p><p><i>To some extent, the exclusion of other variables is simply the result of inadequacies in the data. It is difficult to get information on all relevant factors, and even more difficult to account for their expected effects on health. But some factors are deliberately excluded by the WHO analysis on the basis of paternalistic assumptions about the proper role of health systems. An earlier paper laying out the WHO methodological framework asserts, “Problems such as tobacco consumption, diet, and unsafe sexual activity must be included in an assessment of health system performance.” </i></p><p><i>In other words, the WHO approach holds health systems responsible not just for treating lung cancer, but for preventing smoking in the first place; not just for treating heart disease, but for getting people to exercise and lay off the fatty foods. <br/></i></p><p><i> Second, the WHO approach fails to consider people’s willingness to trade off health against other values. Some people are happy to give up a few potential months or even years of life in exchange for the pleasures of smoking, eating, having sex, playing sports, and so on. The WHO approach, rather than taking the public’s preferences as given, deems some preferences better than others (and then praises or blames the health system for them). </i></p><p><i>A superior (though still imperfect) approach would take people’s health-related behavior as given, and then ask which health systems do the best job of dealing with whatever health conditions arise.<br/></i></p></blockquote><p>In other words, its a bunch of meaningless cherry-picked measurements framed in a way to make the private system appear terrible in order to push for more socialized medicine.  </p><p>Despite all of it’s flaws, which are usually thanks to government market intervention, the United States still has the best health care system on the entire goddamn planet per capita.  It’s most likely that the life-saving equipment and procedures that are used in other hellholes using slave healthcare to save lives are thanks to us.  </p><p>You’re welcome.</p><figure class="tmblr-full" data-orig-height="250" data-orig-width="450"><img src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/b97a460c917c68f3900de0bc46e50c59/tumblr_inline_owpcxquafE1r1jtxd_540.gif" data-orig-height="250" data-orig-width="450"/></figure></blockquote>: ITS EASY TO FORGET THAT FOR DECADES THE U.S. HAD A HEALTHCARE SYSTEM THAT WAS THE ENVY OF THE WORLD. WE HAD THE FINEST DOCTORS AND HOSPITALS, PATIENTS RECEIVED HIGH QUALITY, AFFORDABLE MEDICAL CARE, AND THOUSANDS OF PRIVATELY FUNDED CHARITIES PROVIDED HEALTH SERVICES FOR THE PO0 RON PAUL TURNING POINT USA <p><a href="http://redbloodedamerica.tumblr.com/post/165630900777/bushmeat-said-when-they-tell-you-how-ghastly" class="tumblr_blog">redbloodedamerica</a>:</p> <blockquote><p><a href="http://bushmeat.tumblr.com/" title="bushmeat">bushmeat</a> said:</p><blockquote><p>When they tell you how ghastly socialised healthcare is, remember what they are saying is absolute bullshit <a href="http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-40608253">http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-40608253</a></p></blockquote><p>If I had a nickel every time some leftist moron linked to a World Healthcare Organization or Commonwealth Fund study, well, I would have a shitload of nickels.</p><p>Since my previous source’s website is currently down–<a href="http://redbloodedamerica.tumblr.com/post/142352613032/that-red-guy-montypla-weaselwonderworld">which I’ve used in the past</a> to slap this idiotic notion that other countries’ healthcare systems are somehow superior the US’s private system–I’ll instead point to this <a href="https://object.cato.org/pubs/pas/pa654.pdf">other great explanation</a> by the folks over at CATO on why this pathetic claim is always made by these left-wing think-tanks:</p><blockquote><p><i> The debate over how to reform America’s health care sector often involves comparisons between the United States and other countries, and with good reason. Looking at other countries can help us learn which policies, if any, to emulate, and which to avoid. </i></p><p><i>There have been many attempts at international health care system comparisons.Among the most influential are the World Health Report 2000 published by the World Health Organization, several studies published by the Commonwealth Fund, and individual measures such as infant mortality and “mortality amenable to health care.” Generally in these studies, the United States performs poorly in comparison to Europe, Australia, and Japan. Therefore, scholars often use the studies to argue for adding even more government regulations to our already highly regulated health care system. </i></p><p><i>However, these studies suffer from several problems. First, they often rely on unadjusted aggregate data—such as life expectancy, or mortality from heart disease—that can be affected by many non–health care factors, including nutrition, exercise, and even crime rates. Second,they often use process measures, such as how many patients have received a pap smear or mammogram in the past three years. Process measures tell us what doctors do, but provide only an indirect measure of doctors’ productivity. Third, some of these studies inappropriately incorporate their own biases about financing in their statistics, which makes market-driven health systems appear worse even if their outcomes are similar or better. </i></p><p><i>An additional limitation of these studies is the omission of any measure of innovation. None of the best-known studies factor in the contribution of various countries to the advances that have come to characterize the current practice of health care in the developed world. </i></p><p><i>Every single health care test or treatment must be invented at some point. We would be living in a different world today were it not for the remarkable genius and hard work of health care inventors in the past, as well as investments from government health agencies and pharmaceutical and medical device companies. The health care issues commonly considered most important today—controlling costs and covering the uninsured— arguably should be regarded as secondary to innovation, inasmuch as a treatment must first be invented before its costs can be reduced and its use extended to everyone. </i><br/></p></blockquote><p>Furthermore, from another Glen Whitman <a href="https://object.cato.org/sites/cato.org/files/pubs/pdf/bp101.pdf">article</a>:</p><blockquote><p><i> Those who cite the WHO rankings typically present them as an objective measure of the relative performance of national health care systems. They are not. The WHO rankings depend crucially on a number of underlying assumptions- some of them logically incoherent, some characterized by substantial uncertainty, and some rooted in ideological beliefs and values that not everyone shares. <br/></i></p><p><i> The WHO health care rankings result from an index of health-related statistics. As with any index, it is important to consider how it was constructed, as the construction affects the results. </i><br/></p><p><i> There is good reason to account for the quality of care received by a country’s worst-off or poorest citizens. Yet the Health Distribution and Responsiveness Distribution factors do not do that.Instead, they measure relative differences in quality, without regard to the absolute level of quality. To account for the quality of care received by the worst-off, the index could include a factor that measures health among the poor, or a health care system’s responsiveness to the poor. This would, in essence, give greater weight to the well-being of the worst off.  Alternatively, a separate health performance index could be constructed for poor households or members of disadvantaged minorities. These approaches would surely have problems of their own, but they would at least be focused on the absolute level of health care quality, which should be the paramount concern. <br/></i></p><p><i> The WHO rankings, by purporting to measure the efficacy of health care systems, implicitly take all differences in health outcomes not explained by spending or literacy and attribute them entirely to health care system performance. Nothing else, from tobacco use to nutrition to sheer luck, is taken into account. </i></p><p><i>To some extent, the exclusion of other variables is simply the result of inadequacies in the data. It is difficult to get information on all relevant factors, and even more difficult to account for their expected effects on health. But some factors are deliberately excluded by the WHO analysis on the basis of paternalistic assumptions about the proper role of health systems. An earlier paper laying out the WHO methodological framework asserts, “Problems such as tobacco consumption, diet, and unsafe sexual activity must be included in an assessment of health system performance.” </i></p><p><i>In other words, the WHO approach holds health systems responsible not just for treating lung cancer, but for preventing smoking in the first place; not just for treating heart disease, but for getting people to exercise and lay off the fatty foods. <br/></i></p><p><i> Second, the WHO approach fails to consider people’s willingness to trade off health against other values. Some people are happy to give up a few potential months or even years of life in exchange for the pleasures of smoking, eating, having sex, playing sports, and so on. The WHO approach, rather than taking the public’s preferences as given, deems some preferences better than others (and then praises or blames the health system for them). </i></p><p><i>A superior (though still imperfect) approach would take people’s health-related behavior as given, and then ask which health systems do the best job of dealing with whatever health conditions arise.<br/></i></p></blockquote><p>In other words, its a bunch of meaningless cherry-picked measurements framed in a way to make the private system appear terrible in order to push for more socialized medicine.  </p><p>Despite all of it’s flaws, which are usually thanks to government market intervention, the United States still has the best health care system on the entire goddamn planet per capita.  It’s most likely that the life-saving equipment and procedures that are used in other hellholes using slave healthcare to save lives are thanks to us.  </p><p>You’re welcome.</p><figure class="tmblr-full" data-orig-height="250" data-orig-width="450"><img src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/b97a460c917c68f3900de0bc46e50c59/tumblr_inline_owpcxquafE1r1jtxd_540.gif" data-orig-height="250" data-orig-width="450"/></figure></blockquote>
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<p>Reply From Canadian Doctor.</p>: Canadian Dr.'s reply to companies requiring medical note after sick day... Dater: Ou Dear Employer: An employee of your company visited my office/emergency room for the purpose of obtaining a medical note to satisfy your company s absenteeism policy This request is a non-insured service, not funded by Medical Servic Insurance As a business operator in Nova scotia, I am asking for your support in elping to alleviate an unnecessary pressure on the health-care system.I hoping you wil] consider rvisiting your current absenteeism policy, and remove the requirement for your employees to obtain a medical note for missed time from work This policy creates an unnecessary burden on the health-care system and also exposes seriously 111 patients in my office to viruses that could cause detrimental consequences to their health. In most cases, the best remedy for a patient with an isolated illness (i.e., gastrointestinal virus or common cold) is to stay home, rest and drink fluids. Coming to a doctor's office or an emergency room for a medical note does not complement their recovery If, for whatever reason, your business decides to continue to require a physician to authorize their employees absenteeism, I wil1 require your employee to bring with them a written request from the organization for th medical note. Upon providing the service I will invoice your company 520.00per medical, note. This is a standard practice when providing non- medical necessary services for third-party organizations As Canadians we are lucky to have our health-care system, but the ability to access its services in a timely fashion is a growing problem. Health-care providers, business operators, governments and individuals all have a role to play to ensure its sustainabflity hope your business will consider changing your current absenteeism policy and therefore contribute to reducing the unnecessary burden on our health-care system and improve access for other Nova Scotians. Sincerely <p>Reply From Canadian Doctor.</p>

<p>Reply From Canadian Doctor.</p>

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The Department of Veterans Affairs health care system was again declared a “high risk” area of government, susceptible to waste and mismanagement and in need of more oversight. The Government Accountability Office, a leading government watchdog, presented to Congress on Wednesday its biennial report of government programs that are vulnerable to fraud, waste, abuse and mismanagement. VA health care was listed as one of 34 high-risk areas in the nearly 700-page report. The department didn’t improve enough to be removed this year, the report states. The GAO cited a “lack of progress” and noted ongoing issues at the VA with accountability, information technology, staff training, ambiguous policies and cost efficiency. The VA should be put under careful surveillance by supervisory authorities. For a long time the federal government has not been able to organize the work of this problem agency. Liberals who controlled Washington for 8 years were quite miserable and worthless, they did not care not only about the fate of veterans, but also about the fate of all American patriots. Even after the veteran scandal of May 2014, the VA did not fix anything. I think it's time for Trump administration to officially announce the decision of veterans' problems priority. veteranscomefirst veterans_us Veterans Usveterans veteransUSA SupportVeterans Politics USA America Patriots Gratitude HonorVets thankvets supportourtroops semperfi USMC USCG USAF Navy Army military godblessourmilitary soldier holdthegovernmentaccountable RememberEveryoneDeployed Usflag StarsandStripes: NOVET Should go without. food housing health care Work respect EVER VETERANS ST COM The Department of Veterans Affairs health care system was again declared a “high risk” area of government, susceptible to waste and mismanagement and in need of more oversight. The Government Accountability Office, a leading government watchdog, presented to Congress on Wednesday its biennial report of government programs that are vulnerable to fraud, waste, abuse and mismanagement. VA health care was listed as one of 34 high-risk areas in the nearly 700-page report. The department didn’t improve enough to be removed this year, the report states. The GAO cited a “lack of progress” and noted ongoing issues at the VA with accountability, information technology, staff training, ambiguous policies and cost efficiency. The VA should be put under careful surveillance by supervisory authorities. For a long time the federal government has not been able to organize the work of this problem agency. Liberals who controlled Washington for 8 years were quite miserable and worthless, they did not care not only about the fate of veterans, but also about the fate of all American patriots. Even after the veteran scandal of May 2014, the VA did not fix anything. I think it's time for Trump administration to officially announce the decision of veterans' problems priority. veteranscomefirst veterans_us Veterans Usveterans veteransUSA SupportVeterans Politics USA America Patriots Gratitude HonorVets thankvets supportourtroops semperfi USMC USCG USAF Navy Army military godblessourmilitary soldier holdthegovernmentaccountable RememberEveryoneDeployed Usflag StarsandStripes

The Department of Veterans Affairs health care system was again declared a “high risk” area of government, susceptible to waste and misma...

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<p><a href="http://libertybill.tumblr.com/post/149098105202/cuzyouwanttotakemypicture-yep-from-wacthe" class="tumblr_blog">libertybill</a>:</p> <blockquote><p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://cuzyouwanttotakemypicture.tumblr.com/post/149049455211">cuzyouwanttotakemypicture</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p>Yep</p> </blockquote> <p><a href="https://www.facebook.com/WeAreCapitalists/photos/a.195735437264673.1073741832.157541337750750/361763283995220/">From WAC</a></p><h2>THE MISLEADING CLAIM: </h2><p> “The average hip replacement in the USA costs $40,364. In Spain, it costs $7,371.“</p><h2> The Reality:</h2><p> First, note that Spain has a single-payer health care system run by the government. Their system requires, by law, that the state provide healthcare at “no out-of-pocket” cost to the individual. (except for prescription drugs.) Thus, costs are incurred by taxpayers. </p><p> One reason the cost of surgery is different between the two countries? Incomes are lower in Spain than they are in the U.S. This means the labor component that factors into your hip replacement is severely reduced.</p><p> The Median salary of an Orthopedic surgeon in Spain, for instance, is only $64,152 a year. The same position pays about $432,552 a year in the U.S.</p><p> The labor component for surgery in America is therefore roughly 6.75 times greater than it is in Spain. If one were to adjust the cost of a hip replacement surgery in Spain by accounting for what the surgeon SHOULD be getting paid, we’d see a final price much closer to what’s charged in America. </p><p> WHAT’S THE COST RELATIVE TO MEDIAN INCOME?</p><p> Spain’s Median Household Annual Income, adjusted for purchasing parity, was $17,191 in 2011.<br/> The United States’ Median Household Annual Income, on the other hand, was $50,054 in 2011.</p><p> If the average cost of a hip replacement in Spain is $7,371, that’s roughly 43% of that country’s median household income. Note, that price is billed to the taxpayer. As we’ll demonstrate however, in America, the cost is less burdensome. </p><p> Now, there is no such thing as an “un-insured” price for medical care in Spain, since everyone is insured via the government. Therefore, Spain’s cost must be compared to what INSURED individuals are charged in America. The Average Cost of the same hip replacement surgery in the U.S. is $39,299 (per our sources). This would represent a whopping 78% of median household income IF - and only if - people actually paid it, but they don’t. Most of the cost is billed to private insurance companies, which sustain themselves via profitable investments mitigating the need to profit directly off of consumers. Only about $3,000 is ever billed to an insured individual. That’s around 6% of median household income. </p><p> One might point out that while the costs are mostly incurred by private insurers in America, those insurers merely disperse such costs amongst their customers not unlike the Spanish government passing costs onto taxpayers. This is a fair critique, and for the sake of argument, we can attempt to adjust for that. </p><p> For 2011, premiums for employer-sponsored family-health coverage were roughly $15,500. (Paid largely by the employer) On average, workers, however, only paid about $4300 of that. For single (non-family) coverage, workers paid even less, with an average contribution of only about $950. [x] If we were to include one year’s worth of insurance premium contributions with the cost of this surgery, the cost in America would still only range from $3950 - $7300. That only represents 7.9% - 14.5% of our 2011 median household income, which is significantly less than Spain’s 43%. In fact, for the burden of a U.S. family to match that of Spain, we’d have to include, not only the out-of-pocket expense from the surgery, but also over 4 years of health insurance contributions. For individual coverage, we’d have to include 19.5 years of health insurance contributions! Luckily, our burden isn’t 43% of our median household income. </p><h2> WHAT’S THE CONCLUSION?</h2><p> Yes, the absolute cost is lower in Spain than it is in America, but that cost represents a burden far greater than what we experience in the U.S. Meanwhile, in the United States, depending on how you count it, people only pay an amount equivalent to about 6%, 7.9%, or 14.5% what they earn annually. When Spain’s burden is 43%, which system sounds less burdensome to YOU?<br/> —————————-<br/> Sources: <br/><a href="http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.salaryexplorer.com%2Fsalary-survey.php%3Fjob%3D994%26jobtype%3D3%26gender%3Dm%26loctype%3D1%26loc%3D203&amp;h=JAQFvcvTOAQH7ZRfnwmS7NNEEu5HJUfydJQymIdu_t68lMg&amp;enc=AZPZyj0NReNb807keEKuTPW5Zc8ONlHriOBnqNjp_4pYOHA-Z4LNhac6xVepItYw1t2KPkJ9IHt6FFhn452_o29emowg4G2sX8LziIZCnJxlYMvjljOqi2xAcBvO2n67lrcMNaBS3BhRT4-S9adhoftpSDiUNCV5QAYq42UoiGwYp9-16owUA9UF6eEjZYunhPs&amp;s=1" rel="nofollow">http://www.salaryexplorer.com/salary-survey.php…</a></p><p> <a href="http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.npr.org%2Ftemplates%2Fstory%2Fstory.php%3FstoryId%3D112014770&amp;h=LAQEsg9VXAQFwotpcEQoZZK3NRwUun6wL2bDTRa5aBqd6vg&amp;enc=AZPCCdAPstZvalT4mAtoA46dEyUog5lwvXO4M0L4Oer3XGb6nPoovWD6IcujzshuZcmY-oJtDZg9x26JYmJHE7KnYwhqDefoFzLL2bFDHW1P91r2_fBqyuDAvKSQtYyK6VYcWd-o-Sc2nB0o5ZzyUekjnyPJEVtXZm2tntpyVjNccK8hDzKMtdR-dsWAVYbXB3Y&amp;s=1" rel="nofollow">http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php…</a></p><p> <a href="http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ine.es%2Fen%2Fdaco%2Fdaco42%2Fetcl%2Fetcl0412_en.pdf&amp;h=OAQFGXKQPAQFwLOZpsxTntZ4lwKiqfQkh_uc5yobV6le0iA&amp;enc=AZMTgp-PsHVSHlhvH3WIDCJkEoutGi3xv4F-sz_s1S1C2PG9vVYS9Ck3iT-Rj2LBWv-q2aJlYNY4wW7aiWIHqD5OJ0eq3erC6i1er92ZGLYgbmqzOjBhU2SUP1opihR4zhqlKzRo3DCI5ce32QRfH6OIvUa8zr8IdTr1wmdzDs9YjyQtTD0JfRf45s3k1Y7XYy4&amp;s=1" rel="nofollow">http://www.ine.es/en/daco/daco42/etcl/etcl0412_en.pdf</a></p><p> <a href="http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fstats.oecd.org%2FIndex.aspx%3FDataSetCode%3DIDD&amp;h=cAQGSs6HyAQGkxsdSUp97tqc-deK1iQtU-A6Wqng-u8U0Rg&amp;enc=AZPGImFXgUez1viYoTMZGnhZvfozAfQUDpXN6aaMKD1tKwZ72SjKwc8hzQegbD76-J8ra8NOTQYunqDa98BxhRfPR8CFgYvWj4TrTvqA4Lf_xk-t9hUV3AMiZONtiV2mzOurb3w9f0Gp1VRiVa9SHRuO39JAzDANVYD0d_UsdZ5Fmhi0Tn4jIuTK--l5HnlJDYU&amp;s=1" rel="nofollow">http://stats.oecd.org/Index.aspx?DataSetCode=IDD</a></p><p> <a href="http://health.costhelper.com/hip-replacement.htmlanted=all&amp;_r=0" rel="nofollow">http://health.costhelper.com/hip-replacement.htmlanted=all&amp;…</a></p><p> <a href="http://www.justlanded.com/english/Spain/Articles/Jobs/Doctors" rel="nofollow">http://www.justlanded.com/engli…/Spain/Articles/Jobs/Doctors</a></p><p> [x] (*2011 figures were approximated. Source actually only provided 2010 and 2012 figures, but indicated what the growth rate was in that time, allowing for a 2011 approximation.) <br/><a href="http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ncsl.org%2Fresearch%2Fhealth%2Fhealth-insurance-premiums.aspx&amp;h=FAQHapbpsAQFykomHtGgO8DrldpKuIic20h5uHCEPZgnHWQ&amp;enc=AZNqcOcGPkBVqFWVSz3hAFnSKvBO03iHt45d338nwQUDWxnIBzFFM4xZ3WIzIEB7h6sOurfyeTWesd7NaKP7X7_a83CMCo_ihSN0P8hvQiidD6P082gpBNinoDVXv9sBkmvWdhYpBjHp3N8KtSLWL_TXU7I37nwFwNxU1qmKV-17rhCKAKohXfgNTXgTD6zlJvw&amp;s=1" rel="nofollow">http://www.ncsl.org/resear…/…/health-insurance-premiums.aspx</a></p></blockquote>: THE AVERAGE HIP REPLACEMENT USA SPAIN $40,364 $7,371 THAT MEANS I CAN LITERALLY FLY TO SPAIN, LIVE IN MADRID FOR2 YEARS, LEARN SPANISH, RUN WITH THE BULLS, GET TRAMPLED, GET MY HIP REPLACED AGAIN, AND FLY HOME FOR LESS THAN THE COST OF A HIP REPLACEMENT IN THE US. JOSH SUNDQUIST SHARE IF YOU WANT UNIVERSAL HEALTHCARE IN THE U.S. <p><a href="http://libertybill.tumblr.com/post/149098105202/cuzyouwanttotakemypicture-yep-from-wacthe" class="tumblr_blog">libertybill</a>:</p> <blockquote><p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://cuzyouwanttotakemypicture.tumblr.com/post/149049455211">cuzyouwanttotakemypicture</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p>Yep</p> </blockquote> <p><a href="https://www.facebook.com/WeAreCapitalists/photos/a.195735437264673.1073741832.157541337750750/361763283995220/">From WAC</a></p><h2>THE MISLEADING CLAIM: </h2><p> “The average hip replacement in the USA costs $40,364. In Spain, it costs $7,371.“</p><h2> The Reality:</h2><p> First, note that Spain has a single-payer health care system run by the government. Their system requires, by law, that the state provide healthcare at “no out-of-pocket” cost to the individual. (except for prescription drugs.) Thus, costs are incurred by taxpayers. </p><p> One reason the cost of surgery is different between the two countries? Incomes are lower in Spain than they are in the U.S. This means the labor component that factors into your hip replacement is severely reduced.</p><p> The Median salary of an Orthopedic surgeon in Spain, for instance, is only $64,152 a year. The same position pays about $432,552 a year in the U.S.</p><p> The labor component for surgery in America is therefore roughly 6.75 times greater than it is in Spain. If one were to adjust the cost of a hip replacement surgery in Spain by accounting for what the surgeon SHOULD be getting paid, we’d see a final price much closer to what’s charged in America. </p><p> WHAT’S THE COST RELATIVE TO MEDIAN INCOME?</p><p> Spain’s Median Household Annual Income, adjusted for purchasing parity, was $17,191 in 2011.<br/> The United States’ Median Household Annual Income, on the other hand, was $50,054 in 2011.</p><p> If the average cost of a hip replacement in Spain is $7,371, that’s roughly 43% of that country’s median household income. Note, that price is billed to the taxpayer. As we’ll demonstrate however, in America, the cost is less burdensome. </p><p> Now, there is no such thing as an “un-insured” price for medical care in Spain, since everyone is insured via the government. Therefore, Spain’s cost must be compared to what INSURED individuals are charged in America. The Average Cost of the same hip replacement surgery in the U.S. is $39,299 (per our sources). This would represent a whopping 78% of median household income IF - and only if - people actually paid it, but they don’t. Most of the cost is billed to private insurance companies, which sustain themselves via profitable investments mitigating the need to profit directly off of consumers. Only about $3,000 is ever billed to an insured individual. That’s around 6% of median household income. </p><p> One might point out that while the costs are mostly incurred by private insurers in America, those insurers merely disperse such costs amongst their customers not unlike the Spanish government passing costs onto taxpayers. This is a fair critique, and for the sake of argument, we can attempt to adjust for that. </p><p> For 2011, premiums for employer-sponsored family-health coverage were roughly $15,500. (Paid largely by the employer) On average, workers, however, only paid about $4300 of that. For single (non-family) coverage, workers paid even less, with an average contribution of only about $950. [x] If we were to include one year’s worth of insurance premium contributions with the cost of this surgery, the cost in America would still only range from $3950 - $7300. That only represents 7.9% - 14.5% of our 2011 median household income, which is significantly less than Spain’s 43%. In fact, for the burden of a U.S. family to match that of Spain, we’d have to include, not only the out-of-pocket expense from the surgery, but also over 4 years of health insurance contributions. For individual coverage, we’d have to include 19.5 years of health insurance contributions! Luckily, our burden isn’t 43% of our median household income. </p><h2> WHAT’S THE CONCLUSION?</h2><p> Yes, the absolute cost is lower in Spain than it is in America, but that cost represents a burden far greater than what we experience in the U.S. Meanwhile, in the United States, depending on how you count it, people only pay an amount equivalent to about 6%, 7.9%, or 14.5% what they earn annually. When Spain’s burden is 43%, which system sounds less burdensome to YOU?<br/> —————————-<br/> Sources: <br/><a href="http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.salaryexplorer.com%2Fsalary-survey.php%3Fjob%3D994%26jobtype%3D3%26gender%3Dm%26loctype%3D1%26loc%3D203&amp;h=JAQFvcvTOAQH7ZRfnwmS7NNEEu5HJUfydJQymIdu_t68lMg&amp;enc=AZPZyj0NReNb807keEKuTPW5Zc8ONlHriOBnqNjp_4pYOHA-Z4LNhac6xVepItYw1t2KPkJ9IHt6FFhn452_o29emowg4G2sX8LziIZCnJxlYMvjljOqi2xAcBvO2n67lrcMNaBS3BhRT4-S9adhoftpSDiUNCV5QAYq42UoiGwYp9-16owUA9UF6eEjZYunhPs&amp;s=1" rel="nofollow">http://www.salaryexplorer.com/salary-survey.php…</a></p><p> <a href="http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.npr.org%2Ftemplates%2Fstory%2Fstory.php%3FstoryId%3D112014770&amp;h=LAQEsg9VXAQFwotpcEQoZZK3NRwUun6wL2bDTRa5aBqd6vg&amp;enc=AZPCCdAPstZvalT4mAtoA46dEyUog5lwvXO4M0L4Oer3XGb6nPoovWD6IcujzshuZcmY-oJtDZg9x26JYmJHE7KnYwhqDefoFzLL2bFDHW1P91r2_fBqyuDAvKSQtYyK6VYcWd-o-Sc2nB0o5ZzyUekjnyPJEVtXZm2tntpyVjNccK8hDzKMtdR-dsWAVYbXB3Y&amp;s=1" rel="nofollow">http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php…</a></p><p> <a href="http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ine.es%2Fen%2Fdaco%2Fdaco42%2Fetcl%2Fetcl0412_en.pdf&amp;h=OAQFGXKQPAQFwLOZpsxTntZ4lwKiqfQkh_uc5yobV6le0iA&amp;enc=AZMTgp-PsHVSHlhvH3WIDCJkEoutGi3xv4F-sz_s1S1C2PG9vVYS9Ck3iT-Rj2LBWv-q2aJlYNY4wW7aiWIHqD5OJ0eq3erC6i1er92ZGLYgbmqzOjBhU2SUP1opihR4zhqlKzRo3DCI5ce32QRfH6OIvUa8zr8IdTr1wmdzDs9YjyQtTD0JfRf45s3k1Y7XYy4&amp;s=1" rel="nofollow">http://www.ine.es/en/daco/daco42/etcl/etcl0412_en.pdf</a></p><p> <a href="http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fstats.oecd.org%2FIndex.aspx%3FDataSetCode%3DIDD&amp;h=cAQGSs6HyAQGkxsdSUp97tqc-deK1iQtU-A6Wqng-u8U0Rg&amp;enc=AZPGImFXgUez1viYoTMZGnhZvfozAfQUDpXN6aaMKD1tKwZ72SjKwc8hzQegbD76-J8ra8NOTQYunqDa98BxhRfPR8CFgYvWj4TrTvqA4Lf_xk-t9hUV3AMiZONtiV2mzOurb3w9f0Gp1VRiVa9SHRuO39JAzDANVYD0d_UsdZ5Fmhi0Tn4jIuTK--l5HnlJDYU&amp;s=1" rel="nofollow">http://stats.oecd.org/Index.aspx?DataSetCode=IDD</a></p><p> <a href="http://health.costhelper.com/hip-replacement.htmlanted=all&amp;_r=0" rel="nofollow">http://health.costhelper.com/hip-replacement.htmlanted=all&amp;…</a></p><p> <a href="http://www.justlanded.com/english/Spain/Articles/Jobs/Doctors" rel="nofollow">http://www.justlanded.com/engli…/Spain/Articles/Jobs/Doctors</a></p><p> [x] (*2011 figures were approximated. Source actually only provided 2010 and 2012 figures, but indicated what the growth rate was in that time, allowing for a 2011 approximation.) <br/><a href="http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ncsl.org%2Fresearch%2Fhealth%2Fhealth-insurance-premiums.aspx&amp;h=FAQHapbpsAQFykomHtGgO8DrldpKuIic20h5uHCEPZgnHWQ&amp;enc=AZNqcOcGPkBVqFWVSz3hAFnSKvBO03iHt45d338nwQUDWxnIBzFFM4xZ3WIzIEB7h6sOurfyeTWesd7NaKP7X7_a83CMCo_ihSN0P8hvQiidD6P082gpBNinoDVXv9sBkmvWdhYpBjHp3N8KtSLWL_TXU7I37nwFwNxU1qmKV-17rhCKAKohXfgNTXgTD6zlJvw&amp;s=1" rel="nofollow">http://www.ncsl.org/resear…/…/health-insurance-premiums.aspx</a></p></blockquote>

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