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Memes, Oscars, and Shade: How 4 Undocumented, Mexican Immigrant High School Students & Their cheap Robot Beat MIT Source: WIRED (2004) THE TEAM: Carl Hayden Community High School Falcon Robotics Club @undocumedia 🇲🇽🇺🇸🙌✨👏To the date - one of our favorite stories flashback - & they named their robot "Stinky" "While other teams machined and welded metal frames, the guys broke out the rubber glue and began assembling the PVC pipe. They did the whole thing in one night, got high on the pungent fumes, and dubbed their new creation Stinky. Lorenzo painted it garish shades of blue, red, and yellow to designate the functionality of specific pipes. Every inch of PVC had a clear purpose. It was the type of machine only an engineer would describe as beautiful. Carl Hayden Community High School doesn’t have a swimming pool, so one weekend in May, after about six weeks of work in the classroom, the team took Stinky to a scuba training pool in downtown Phoenix for its baptism. Luis hefted the machine up and gently placed it in the water. They powered it up. Cristian had hacked together off-the-shelf joysticks, a motherboard, motors, and an array of onboard finger-sized video cameras, which now sent flickering images to black-and-white monitors on a folding picnic table. Using five small electric trolling motors, the robot could spin and tilt in any direction. To move smoothly, two drivers had to coordinate their commands. The first thing they did was smash the robot into a wall. “This is good, this is good,” Oscar kept repeating, buying himself a few seconds to come up with a positive spin. “Did you see how hard it hit the wall? This thing’s got power. Once we figure out how to drive it, we’ll be the fastest team there.” By early June, as the contest neared, the team had the hang of it. Stinky now buzzed through the water, dodging all obstacles. The drivers, Cristian and Oscar, could make the bot hover, spin in place, and angle up or down. They could send enough power to Stinky‘s small engines to pull Luis around the pool. They felt like they had a good shot at not placing last. ... “And the overall winner for the Marine Technology ROV championship,” Merrill continued, looking up at the crowd, “goes to Carl Hayden High School of Phoenix, Arizona!” (2004) Picture by @liviacoronabenjamin immigration undocumented Mexico Mexican robotics arizona SpareParts MIT HereToStay
Memes, Oscars, and Shade: How 4 Undocumented, Mexican
 Immigrant High School Students &
 Their cheap Robot Beat MIT
 Source: WIRED (2004)
 THE TEAM: Carl Hayden Community High School
 Falcon Robotics Club
 @undocumedia
🇲🇽🇺🇸🙌✨👏To the date - one of our favorite stories flashback - & they named their robot "Stinky" "While other teams machined and welded metal frames, the guys broke out the rubber glue and began assembling the PVC pipe. They did the whole thing in one night, got high on the pungent fumes, and dubbed their new creation Stinky. Lorenzo painted it garish shades of blue, red, and yellow to designate the functionality of specific pipes. Every inch of PVC had a clear purpose. It was the type of machine only an engineer would describe as beautiful. Carl Hayden Community High School doesn’t have a swimming pool, so one weekend in May, after about six weeks of work in the classroom, the team took Stinky to a scuba training pool in downtown Phoenix for its baptism. Luis hefted the machine up and gently placed it in the water. They powered it up. Cristian had hacked together off-the-shelf joysticks, a motherboard, motors, and an array of onboard finger-sized video cameras, which now sent flickering images to black-and-white monitors on a folding picnic table. Using five small electric trolling motors, the robot could spin and tilt in any direction. To move smoothly, two drivers had to coordinate their commands. The first thing they did was smash the robot into a wall. “This is good, this is good,” Oscar kept repeating, buying himself a few seconds to come up with a positive spin. “Did you see how hard it hit the wall? This thing’s got power. Once we figure out how to drive it, we’ll be the fastest team there.” By early June, as the contest neared, the team had the hang of it. Stinky now buzzed through the water, dodging all obstacles. The drivers, Cristian and Oscar, could make the bot hover, spin in place, and angle up or down. They could send enough power to Stinky‘s small engines to pull Luis around the pool. They felt like they had a good shot at not placing last. ... “And the overall winner for the Marine Technology ROV championship,” Merrill continued, looking up at the crowd, “goes to Carl Hayden High School of Phoenix, Arizona!” (2004) Picture by @liviacoronabenjamin immigration undocumented Mexico Mexican robotics arizona SpareParts MIT HereToStay

🇲🇽🇺🇸🙌✨👏To the date - one of our favorite stories flashback - & they named their robot "Stinky" "While other teams machined and welded metal ...

Memes, Protest, and History: Fla. High School Students Protest to Make African-American History a Full-Year Course TERRY PAR KER H I G H SCHOOL 7thsoulja4 Students at Terry Parker High School in Jacksonville, Fla., staged a sit-in earlier this week demanding a change in the way African-American history is taught in Duval County Public Schools, Action News Jax reports. The organizer of the sit-in, Angelina Roque, said that she and her other classmates wanted to protest because they believed that African-American history is a topic that deserves a full year of class time, which will in turn benefit all of their classmates. Students and their parents met with administrators Tuesday to discuss the topic. According to Action News Jax, the course is currently offered only as a semester-long, or half-year, course.Roque, a 10th-grader, told the news station that the protest was to "make them hear us, make them see us, make them listen to us." She was one of about 10 or so other students who called for a change. “[The other students] risked being in trouble over a cause that we all truly think more people should be concerned about,” Roque said. Superintendent Nikolai Vitti said that the students who raised the issue of the way the class is being taught will not be disciplined. “Historically, Terry Parker and other high schools in Duval County has offered the course, but as a half-credit, not as a full credit … we will, and are certainly willing to offer it as a full-year course starting in the fall," Vitti said. "I respect that students demonstrated self-advocacy ‎and used their voice to signal concerns about their education. If there is student demand for a full-credit and yearlong African-American-history course, then we should and will provide it to students. We will work through the process of developing and offering that course.”Action News Jax investigated how other neighboring school districts taught African-American history to compare. In Clay County, African-American history is currently offered as a half-credit, semester-long elective, the same as in Duval. In St. Johns County, schools offer a different course, African-American literature, which is a yearlong elective course. “Being able to have a full course of African-American history … that will honestly make a big difference. 17thsoulja
Memes, Protest, and History: Fla. High School
 Students Protest to
 Make African-American
 History a Full-Year
 Course
 TERRY PAR KER H I G H SCHOOL
 7thsoulja4
Students at Terry Parker High School in Jacksonville, Fla., staged a sit-in earlier this week demanding a change in the way African-American history is taught in Duval County Public Schools, Action News Jax reports. The organizer of the sit-in, Angelina Roque, said that she and her other classmates wanted to protest because they believed that African-American history is a topic that deserves a full year of class time, which will in turn benefit all of their classmates. Students and their parents met with administrators Tuesday to discuss the topic. According to Action News Jax, the course is currently offered only as a semester-long, or half-year, course.Roque, a 10th-grader, told the news station that the protest was to "make them hear us, make them see us, make them listen to us." She was one of about 10 or so other students who called for a change. “[The other students] risked being in trouble over a cause that we all truly think more people should be concerned about,” Roque said. Superintendent Nikolai Vitti said that the students who raised the issue of the way the class is being taught will not be disciplined. “Historically, Terry Parker and other high schools in Duval County has offered the course, but as a half-credit, not as a full credit … we will, and are certainly willing to offer it as a full-year course starting in the fall," Vitti said. "I respect that students demonstrated self-advocacy ‎and used their voice to signal concerns about their education. If there is student demand for a full-credit and yearlong African-American-history course, then we should and will provide it to students. We will work through the process of developing and offering that course.”Action News Jax investigated how other neighboring school districts taught African-American history to compare. In Clay County, African-American history is currently offered as a half-credit, semester-long elective, the same as in Duval. In St. Johns County, schools offer a different course, African-American literature, which is a yearlong elective course. “Being able to have a full course of African-American history … that will honestly make a big difference. 17thsoulja

Students at Terry Parker High School in Jacksonville, Fla., staged a sit-in earlier this week demanding a change in the way African-American...