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I Gave: Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRRomeo I just had such an affirming experience. On my 8hr intl flight back from a conference, I sat next to a father/son. In broken English, the father began to apologize/ warn me that his ~10 yr-old son had severe nonverbal autism, and that this would like be a difficult journey. 1/ 2:59 p.m. 28 Aug. 19 Twitter Web App 41.3K Retweets 178K Likes Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR... 18h Replying to @Rachel RRomeo I told him not to worry, I was a speech-language pathologist with lots of experience with minimally verbal kiddos. Challenging behaviors began even before take off: screaming, hitting me, and grabbing for my things. The father repeatedly apologized, but did little else 2/ t 813 19.2K 55 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR...18h I asked him how his son preferred to communicate. He didn't seem to understand. Perhaps this was a language barrier, but I think instead the child had very little experience with communication therapy. I put away the talk I was working on & asked if I could try. He nodded. 3/ 11 L 705 18.1K Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR... 18h I tried to see if he was stimulable for a communication board. I started by pulling up some standard images for basic nouns on my computer but I could tell that screens really bothered him. So I summoned my god-awful drawing skills and tried to create a (very!) low-tech board. 4/ 1680 13 18.3K Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR... 18h And by god, it clicked. I made symbols for the things he was favorite stuffed penguin, and for his dad. He took to it very quickly. I introduced way more symbols that I normally would, but hey, how often do we get an 8-hour session?! 5/ grabbing, for his Li 768 20 22.6K Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR... 18h By the end of the flight, he had made several requests, initiated several times, & his behaviors had reduced quite a bit. The father was astounded clearly no one had ever tried an AAC approach with him. I gave him the paper & showed him how to use it, and he nearly cried. 6/ 1992 105 28.5K Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR... 18h This was the human desire for communication, pure and simple. To connect with another person and share a thought. Communication is a basic human right, and I was overjoyed to help someone find it. What a privilege and a gift. 7/ t 2,713 48.5K 172 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR... 18h As I face the upcoming job cycle and the nearly endless imposter syndrome of academia, this was precisely the reminder I needed about why l love studying language/communication development. It was a good day to be an #SLP ! 8/8 2,387 2,987 94K
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fierceawakening: adelmortescryche: Reblogging for other diasporic and expat folk. Especially non-caucasian diasporic and expat folk. Some things change when you shift countries. Keep the changes in mind. Whenever I see this I wonder what the gun guys think about it. : What should I absolutely not do when visiting the USA? Charlie Knoles, I have lived in 5 countries and am an Aussie expat in the USA Answered 2d ago + Don't get out of your car ifyou get pulled over by police. I was pulled over by a police officer while driving in Iowa. It was one week afterI had arrived in the USA for the first time. I had accidentally made a minor mistake disobeying a traffic sign. Back home in Australia it's considered polite to get out of your car and walk over to the police officer's car and hand him your license so he doesn't have to get out of his seat. I wanted to be extra polite so I immediately jumped out of my car and walked towards his car while reaching into my back pocket. I'm lucky to be alive. If you come from a gun-free country like the UK or Australia you don't have any natural instinct for gun culture. You don't realize that police assume that everyone is armed. Things got immediately serious. The police officer's hand went to his weapon and I responded by dropping to my knees with my hands up. He yelled a bunch of things at me but my memory is vague because my heartbeat was suddenly pulsing in my ears blotting out all sound. I don't know if he drew his weapon or not. I was staring intently at the ground, shaking and trying to project non- threatening vibes. My next memory is that there were three police cars around me and a bunch of cops who'd been called for backup. They were all keeping their hands close to their guns. After some time passed (a minute? 30 minutes?I have no idea) the tensions de-escalated and they told me to get up. I gave the officer my license and tried to explain why I'd approached him. It was completely incomprehensible to him that there was a place where people don't fear cops and vice versa at traffic stops. It was as though I was trying to tell him that I came from Narnia and our cops were all talking animals. I've spoken to several British people, New Zealanders, and Australians who have shared almost identical stories. They really need to put signs up in all major US airports. Don't get out of your car if stopped by police. They will assume you are armed and they might shoot you. fierceawakening: adelmortescryche: Reblogging for other diasporic and expat folk. Especially non-caucasian diasporic and expat folk. Some things change when you shift countries. Keep the changes in mind. Whenever I see this I wonder what the gun guys think about it.

fierceawakening: adelmortescryche: Reblogging for other diasporic and expat folk. Especially non-caucasian diasporic and expat folk. Some...

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hippo-pot: awesomacious: The sweetest granddaughter btw the marshmallow test has been linked to class - kids from wealthier families are essentially more likely to trust that they will actually get the marshmallow if they wait whereas poorer kids are generally more used to like, if you have food, eat it. and being wealthier correlates to being more successful later in life because our system is broken. so THAT’s probably why the marshmallow test is a predictor - because it tells you who is wealthy, not who is innately primed to be successful Classic correlation does not equal causation: What is the loveliest thing a child has ever said to you? Richard Muller, Prof Physics, UC Berkeley, author "Now, The Physics of Time" Updated Aug 2, 2017 Originally Answered: What is the loveliest thing your child has ever said? "Would you like one, Grandpa?" OK- it was not my child but my 3-year-old granddaughter, but I still think it counts. I had read about the marshmallow test. You give a child a marshmallow, and then say that if she (Layla, in this case) could keep from eating it for 10 minutes, you'll give her a second. So I tried that test with my granddaughter (not with marshmallows, but with chocolate, which she likes much more) According to extensive experiments, children who "pass" the "marshmallow test" are far more successful in later life. They have learned a fundamental truth in life, that delayed gratification can lead to a far better long-term outcome. She sat and watched the chocolate. The 10-minute hourglass finally emptied, and she had succeeded. She asked for her second piece of chocolate. I gave it to her, and she now had two in her hand. That's when she looked up at me and asked, "Would you like one, Grandpa?" Needless to say, from that moment on I would readily give my life for her. 1.3m views View Upvoters View Sharers hippo-pot: awesomacious: The sweetest granddaughter btw the marshmallow test has been linked to class - kids from wealthier families are essentially more likely to trust that they will actually get the marshmallow if they wait whereas poorer kids are generally more used to like, if you have food, eat it. and being wealthier correlates to being more successful later in life because our system is broken. so THAT’s probably why the marshmallow test is a predictor - because it tells you who is wealthy, not who is innately primed to be successful Classic correlation does not equal causation

hippo-pot: awesomacious: The sweetest granddaughter btw the marshmallow test has been linked to class - kids from wealthier families are...

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