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omegalovaniac: rosalarian: grace-and-ace: johncribati: marco-domino: kaytivity: This book looks so cute??? And it’s an ace romance book?? (That’s the first I’ve seen) I’m definitely reading the his hell yeah QUEER POC ASEXUAL BOOK?????? FUCK YEAHH!! HeishskzosgsmIsvdus uh And if the tagline alone isn’t enough to make this legit in your eyes: This is the closet asexual mood. Perfectly encapsulated and immortalized. someone wanna donate to my paypal so i can read this???? :o This looks so good! on my reading list. ooh. : Verizon LTE 12:51 AM Done barnesandnoble.comC Let's Talk About Love, by Claire Kann (January 23) Let's take a moment to obsess over that gloriously joyful and asexual cover, shall we? Okay, now we can move onto the glorious and biromantic) asexual book! Alice is a 19-year- old college student who's out and proud...as bi, anyway. As ace? Not so much. She already lost her last girlfriend over her asexuality, and she isn't CLAIRE KANN Let's Talk About Love Hardcover $15.57 | $16.99 Pre-Order: Add to Bag See All Formats & Editions interested in going through that again. Or at least she wasn't until she met Takumi, whos absolutely adorable and has wormed his way into the heart she'd been trying so hard to close omegalovaniac: rosalarian: grace-and-ace: johncribati: marco-domino: kaytivity: This book looks so cute??? And it’s an ace romance book?? (That’s the first I’ve seen) I’m definitely reading the his hell yeah QUEER POC ASEXUAL BOOK?????? FUCK YEAHH!! HeishskzosgsmIsvdus uh And if the tagline alone isn’t enough to make this legit in your eyes: This is the closet asexual mood. Perfectly encapsulated and immortalized. someone wanna donate to my paypal so i can read this???? :o This looks so good! on my reading list. ooh.
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makaveli-immortalized: Tupac Shakur with Chi Modu Over the years, people have always said that my images of Tupac let them see a side of him beyond the Thug Life image, more about the human being. Before he was loved by the world, he was a young man trying to make his way in a society that is extremely cruel to the less fortunate. He made it his mission to speak for those in his community who needed to hear “keep your head up!” As I travel the globe, I’m amazed at how many people have told me that Tupac saved their lives. His words and passion inspired a generation, and these pictures that we created together help to keep that inspiration alive. It’s always sad when people die young, but if you leave behind the kind of legacy that Tupac did, you never actually die. You remain forever in the hearts and minds of people for generations to come. I knew that about him when we first spent time together in Atlanta, Georgia back in 1994. We both knew the importance of images and we set out to do a thorough job, not knowing what the future would hold. He died two years after that meeting in Atlanta, but his words and these images are all part of his lasting legacy. When I met him on location in Atlanta in ’94 he was quite cooperative and a really nice guy. It was a shoot for The Source magazine, and he arrived early. Tupac was the ultimate professional, and he respected my time and my skills. The public might not know that about him. They think he was just this crazy guy who had no real limits, but he completely understood who he was, and if he understood what you brought to the table, he was easy to deal with. In fact, we got along great. I think a lot of people want to buy into the ‘thug life’ image and the younger side of him, because he was still a young man. Let’s be clear, you kind of forget the ages of these folks. To be so prolific and so young, and have so much power — it’s hard to imagine Even with all the childishness — which I believe was age appropriate in a lot of ways—when you throw power and money in there, even with all that, he had a lot of care and love for his community and for the less fortunate. He always spoke on behalf of black people who were struggling. Even though he wrote songs that many would consider typical hip-hop party music, he also included a lot of black empowerment in his lyrics — “Brenda’s Got a Baby,” “Dear Mama” — which I believe is why women liked him. They loved him because he was real and he cared. We knew the silly side of him too, but who isn’t silly at the age of twenty five? So that never surprised me when he did the zany stuff. He was young and full of power in a world that’s biased against blacks, so what do you expect? Normally when I would see Tupac, I would always think of him being on blast — excited and moving at a hundred miles an hour. But when I first met him he wasn’t really like that. It’s funny how everyone always thinks about Tupac and the ladies, but I never really saw him chasing women that much. He was much more focused on his mission. I think that’s what made him stand out so much from his peers. Because while everybody was partying, this man was trying to make sure he created his legacy. And so here we are decades later talking about the man as if he’s still around. I don’t think you can take lightly the fact that this is two decades later and we’re still talking about this man. After we finished his first Source cover shoot in Atlanta, we went back to his home in Stone Mountain, GA to hang out. He called me aside and showed me his entire gun collection in his bedroom—all his AKs, banana clips, Glocks, everything. Then he moved a picture on the wall in his bedroom, revealing a bullet hole. This was from when he fired a shot in his bedroom because he was on probation and prohibited from going to the firing range. We all laughed afterwards. We would’ve all been in our 40s together, but he never got to his 40s, he didn’t even see his 30s with us. So that’s quite a body of work and experience that he put in during his short time on this Earth. He was one of the few stars who could cross over without compromising his roots. Tupac wasn’t going to compromise, that wasn’t him, but Versace still wanted to use him for their campaign. It’s funny when I see rappers trying to do that sort of thing. I think when you start to move in those commercial circles they make you change yourself to fit. You lose your authenticity, but Tupac wouldn’t allow that of himself. He took the streets with him wherever he went. The portrait shots of Tupac, like the one that’s on the cover of the book, were actually done with a 4x5 camera, which is a view camera. It’s the camera where you put the curtain over your head to focus. It’s large format. It sits on a tripod, and you put the film in, come out from behind the camera, you click it, then you switch the film. Kind of like the old style cameras. At that session in Atlanta, I photographed Tupac with my 4x5 with no assistant. It was just me and his people. When you shoot using a 4x5 you’re really very close to the subject. I was no more than three or four feet from him. I’m there but the gap between us is the camera, even though I’m right there with them. When you’re that close to someone frame after frame, that’s really how they get to know you. You’re almost breathing on each other, and I’m telling him, ‘Lift your head, bring your eyes down.’ I’m giving him instructions so he can look better. Once you spend hours with someone like that, you know them forever. I’m looking at every pore on your face. I’m on your team. In doing that first photo shoot in 4x5, I think that’s what made Tupac so comfortable with me because I was looking in his eyes, he was looking in mine at the same time, and real recognizes real. Once we got to that place we were cool. He gave me pictures he didn’t give anybody else and he said, ‘These are for you, Chi.’ Everybody knows the Thug Life Tupac, and we know that well. But they don’t know the Tupac in the quiet moments. Like that picture of him tying his bandana over his head, the profile shot. That’s an outtake. He was fixing his bandana with a cigarette in his mouth but he was relaxed enough around me where I could just photograph him. As a result you see a picture of a much more gentle Tupac. For me gentle and soft are not the same thing. Tupac was gentle but you wouldn’t dare step to him. He was prepared to take it where it needed to go. He wasn’t afraid. That’s who he was to me, and we got along from the first time we met. We were cool, so I got access to him that no one else could get. Tupac wanted me to shoot his album Me Against the World, he told me to get in touch with the art director in New York. By the time I went there to meet, they had already given the assignment to someone else. What’s funny is I had already taken what would later become the most iconic imagery of Tupac. So when you look at the more famous portraits of Tupac like him tying his bandanna and the Rolling Stone cover, I had already created those pictures before I went to meet the art director to discuss the album. No one knew at the time that the photos I took of him would be the images people remember and not the ones they used on the album. In a way you end up getting your justice if you wait long enough When I set out to take these photographs I knew they were important. I wanted to make sure the images stayed within the community. I wanted to make sure the person who created them was from the community. Historically that never really happens. Most of the visuals of the greats are owned and controlled by other people. That’s tricky because then they can put their interpretation on it. But when you look at my photographs, I’m there with them. I’m one of them even though I’m an observer. I was close enough to live it and I had the skills to document and record it. I had four sessions with him, and since we were close he let me in close. It’s friends hanging out with friends and there just happened to be a camera present. You can see the closeness and the warmth because I didn’t really look at my subjects as just celebrities. I saw them as young black guys like me. It allowed me to get closer and it allowed them to be comfortable and just be who they were. I offered no judgment. I was just there to document and make people look good. Even though I was the creator of these images, I’ve always felt more like the caretaker of them, because he was the world’s Tupac, not just my photo subject. He burned bright when he was here and his flame continues to glow. Thank you for being the voice of the voiceless, Tupac. Rest in peace, brother. Excerpted from Tupac Shakur: Uncategorized by Chi Modu, a 200-page hardcover book featuring over 100 powerful images of Tupac Shakur. : makaveli-immortalized: Tupac Shakur with Chi Modu Over the years, people have always said that my images of Tupac let them see a side of him beyond the Thug Life image, more about the human being. Before he was loved by the world, he was a young man trying to make his way in a society that is extremely cruel to the less fortunate. He made it his mission to speak for those in his community who needed to hear “keep your head up!” As I travel the globe, I’m amazed at how many people have told me that Tupac saved their lives. His words and passion inspired a generation, and these pictures that we created together help to keep that inspiration alive. It’s always sad when people die young, but if you leave behind the kind of legacy that Tupac did, you never actually die. You remain forever in the hearts and minds of people for generations to come. I knew that about him when we first spent time together in Atlanta, Georgia back in 1994. We both knew the importance of images and we set out to do a thorough job, not knowing what the future would hold. He died two years after that meeting in Atlanta, but his words and these images are all part of his lasting legacy. When I met him on location in Atlanta in ’94 he was quite cooperative and a really nice guy. It was a shoot for The Source magazine, and he arrived early. Tupac was the ultimate professional, and he respected my time and my skills. The public might not know that about him. They think he was just this crazy guy who had no real limits, but he completely understood who he was, and if he understood what you brought to the table, he was easy to deal with. In fact, we got along great. I think a lot of people want to buy into the ‘thug life’ image and the younger side of him, because he was still a young man. Let’s be clear, you kind of forget the ages of these folks. To be so prolific and so young, and have so much power — it’s hard to imagine Even with all the childishness — which I believe was age appropriate in a lot of ways—when you throw power and money in there, even with all that, he had a lot of care and love for his community and for the less fortunate. He always spoke on behalf of black people who were struggling. Even though he wrote songs that many would consider typical hip-hop party music, he also included a lot of black empowerment in his lyrics — “Brenda’s Got a Baby,” “Dear Mama” — which I believe is why women liked him. They loved him because he was real and he cared. We knew the silly side of him too, but who isn’t silly at the age of twenty five? So that never surprised me when he did the zany stuff. He was young and full of power in a world that’s biased against blacks, so what do you expect? Normally when I would see Tupac, I would always think of him being on blast — excited and moving at a hundred miles an hour. But when I first met him he wasn’t really like that. It’s funny how everyone always thinks about Tupac and the ladies, but I never really saw him chasing women that much. He was much more focused on his mission. I think that’s what made him stand out so much from his peers. Because while everybody was partying, this man was trying to make sure he created his legacy. And so here we are decades later talking about the man as if he’s still around. I don’t think you can take lightly the fact that this is two decades later and we’re still talking about this man. After we finished his first Source cover shoot in Atlanta, we went back to his home in Stone Mountain, GA to hang out. He called me aside and showed me his entire gun collection in his bedroom—all his AKs, banana clips, Glocks, everything. Then he moved a picture on the wall in his bedroom, revealing a bullet hole. This was from when he fired a shot in his bedroom because he was on probation and prohibited from going to the firing range. We all laughed afterwards. We would’ve all been in our 40s together, but he never got to his 40s, he didn’t even see his 30s with us. So that’s quite a body of work and experience that he put in during his short time on this Earth. He was one of the few stars who could cross over without compromising his roots. Tupac wasn’t going to compromise, that wasn’t him, but Versace still wanted to use him for their campaign. It’s funny when I see rappers trying to do that sort of thing. I think when you start to move in those commercial circles they make you change yourself to fit. You lose your authenticity, but Tupac wouldn’t allow that of himself. He took the streets with him wherever he went. The portrait shots of Tupac, like the one that’s on the cover of the book, were actually done with a 4x5 camera, which is a view camera. It’s the camera where you put the curtain over your head to focus. It’s large format. It sits on a tripod, and you put the film in, come out from behind the camera, you click it, then you switch the film. Kind of like the old style cameras. At that session in Atlanta, I photographed Tupac with my 4x5 with no assistant. It was just me and his people. When you shoot using a 4x5 you’re really very close to the subject. I was no more than three or four feet from him. I’m there but the gap between us is the camera, even though I’m right there with them. When you’re that close to someone frame after frame, that’s really how they get to know you. You’re almost breathing on each other, and I’m telling him, ‘Lift your head, bring your eyes down.’ I’m giving him instructions so he can look better. Once you spend hours with someone like that, you know them forever. I’m looking at every pore on your face. I’m on your team. In doing that first photo shoot in 4x5, I think that’s what made Tupac so comfortable with me because I was looking in his eyes, he was looking in mine at the same time, and real recognizes real. Once we got to that place we were cool. He gave me pictures he didn’t give anybody else and he said, ‘These are for you, Chi.’ Everybody knows the Thug Life Tupac, and we know that well. But they don’t know the Tupac in the quiet moments. Like that picture of him tying his bandana over his head, the profile shot. That’s an outtake. He was fixing his bandana with a cigarette in his mouth but he was relaxed enough around me where I could just photograph him. As a result you see a picture of a much more gentle Tupac. For me gentle and soft are not the same thing. Tupac was gentle but you wouldn’t dare step to him. He was prepared to take it where it needed to go. He wasn’t afraid. That’s who he was to me, and we got along from the first time we met. We were cool, so I got access to him that no one else could get. Tupac wanted me to shoot his album Me Against the World, he told me to get in touch with the art director in New York. By the time I went there to meet, they had already given the assignment to someone else. What’s funny is I had already taken what would later become the most iconic imagery of Tupac. So when you look at the more famous portraits of Tupac like him tying his bandanna and the Rolling Stone cover, I had already created those pictures before I went to meet the art director to discuss the album. No one knew at the time that the photos I took of him would be the images people remember and not the ones they used on the album. In a way you end up getting your justice if you wait long enough When I set out to take these photographs I knew they were important. I wanted to make sure the images stayed within the community. I wanted to make sure the person who created them was from the community. Historically that never really happens. Most of the visuals of the greats are owned and controlled by other people. That’s tricky because then they can put their interpretation on it. But when you look at my photographs, I’m there with them. I’m one of them even though I’m an observer. I was close enough to live it and I had the skills to document and record it. I had four sessions with him, and since we were close he let me in close. It’s friends hanging out with friends and there just happened to be a camera present. You can see the closeness and the warmth because I didn’t really look at my subjects as just celebrities. I saw them as young black guys like me. It allowed me to get closer and it allowed them to be comfortable and just be who they were. I offered no judgment. I was just there to document and make people look good. Even though I was the creator of these images, I’ve always felt more like the caretaker of them, because he was the world’s Tupac, not just my photo subject. He burned bright when he was here and his flame continues to glow. Thank you for being the voice of the voiceless, Tupac. Rest in peace, brother. Excerpted from Tupac Shakur: Uncategorized by Chi Modu, a 200-page hardcover book featuring over 100 powerful images of Tupac Shakur.

makaveli-immortalized: Tupac Shakur with Chi Modu Over the years, people have always said that my images of Tupac let them see a side o...

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That…http://omg-humor.tumblr.com: SARINGAN, Emanuel Josef V. Malacahang Field Trip Hi 166- Section D Never has the Philippines had a more symbolic seat of power than "the Palace", Seeing it in real life is going to give any Filipino the chills especially those who aspire to hold the coveted position later. We give credit to all those leaders who carried the nation along with its problems by creating a palace that you, as a taxpayer, probably wanted to occupy too. The story the museum holds, which spans from 1750 up to the present however, is more than a picture in the 20 peso bill. It is a symbol which binds us to pever again act as individuals in a state but rather as citizens who are part of a democracy. However, going to the Malacañang is figuratively and literally difficult since 1.) Becoming the president is destiny, let alone the fact that 2.) Travelling from Ateneo to Mendiola is not so straightforward. You know that you are near Malacañang when the university belt and a group of rallyists welcome you upon going down the MRT station. Once inside the complex, Mr. Lacierda's jokes made up for the fact that PNoy never showed up. His absence is understandable since he is in the US. but I believe that any trip is not going to be complete without the President himself. The tour began and the sights of the old but not yet run down palace amazed me due of the incredible maintenance efforts that sustained the complex for around 3 centuries. We then went to the galleries and experienced a blast from the past as we strode and listened to the guide who knows everything about every thing in the museum. We had to enter and desert offices in the same way our presidents did back then and after a tiring visitation of 15 galleries, you probably would be thankful that we did not have as many presidents as the U.S. Prior to the tour, never have I thought that Malacañang was interesting. I saw the first air con system (which I think is not going to malfunction anytime soon) in the country and the million dollar chandeliers which I could not make out in my imagination what they are for. Such extravagant items that Pres. Quezon bought teases you to think of how tempting it is to hold such powers. Indeed, future presidents made people live and cry during their terms but they are recorded in history nonetheless. The Martial Law chair that FM used never became the ordinary chair that it was after the declaration but was rather immortalized and is going to be a symbol that evokes fear long after its owner died. However, Yin and Yang philosophers will say otherwise since some people benefitted too. Such is the truth behind history, it is never one-sided. Goodbye is difficult to say for presidents who leave Malacalang. Such is also the case for us who will never forget how the staff welcomed and accommodated us wholeheartedly. Somehow the Palace is going to occupy a place in my memory because it has inspired me and renewed my pride so that I could tell the world that I am a Filipino, At the end of all that is told about the Palace's history, it remains as asymbol of public service. Despite our bad political track record where it is normal for people to steal le and cheat, it should not discourage our generation to make a change but rather see is as a challenge and an inspiration to serve others. Malacañang is a pedestal high enough for us to see those who are hurt and oppressed and it is upon us whether to act or not. That's all for now Malacañang, I hope to see ou ugain in the future. 1 am looking forward to being an occupant of yours someday. YOU SIR Were just Rick Rolled TASTE OF AWESOME.COM THAT... Was beautiful... TASTE OF AWESOME.COM You're probably better off not going to That…http://omg-humor.tumblr.com

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What Robert Downey Jr. Did When He Was At His Worsthttp://advice-animal.tumblr.com/: HITTING BOTTOM Po Stone MEET THE NEW ACTION A-LISTI EMERE NAPE S KeSha ROBERT DOWNEYR IRON MAN Green Day POMECUAN Penks Cenguer Bebatwan Robert Downey Jr. Hardass. Flake Superstar- and an Iron Man, Too PLUSI MANDE LA SENDLEHUKEMOS O Fa SAMDOMA MINMAMAN DARMOTROUTIROKU 30 HOLIYGIFT IDEAS TS RANDE PORNO VATRA Devjtku, IT'S GO TIME ROBERT DOWNEY kitn th Rankin& HeidiKlum ENATO BOHATÍ? JR. AVATAR gla Sarlock Robert Downey Jr." CHRISTOPHER PLUMMER BEST Matuniae His name is Robert Downey Jr. You've probably heard of him. You may or may not be a fan, but I am, and I was in the early 90's when this story takes place. It was at a garden party for the ACLU of Southem Califomia. My stepmother was the executive director, which is why I was in attendance without having to pay the $150 fee. It's not that I don't support the ACLU, it's that I was barely twenty and had no money to speak of. I was escorting my grandmother. There isn't enough room in this essay to explain to you everything she was, I would need volumes, so for the sake of brevity i will tell you that she was beautiful even in her sighties, vain as the day is long, and whip smart, though her particular sort of intelligence did not encompass recognizing young celebrities. I pointed out Robert Downey Jr. to her when he arrived, in a gorgeous cream-colored linen suit, with Sarah Jessica Parker on his arm. My grandmother shrugged, far more interested in piling her paper plate with various unidentifiable cheeses cut into cubes. He wasn't Carey Grant or Gregory Peck. What did she care? The afternoon's main honoree was Ron Kovic, whose story of his time in the Vietnam War that had left him confined to a wheelchair had recently been immortalized in the Oliver Stone film Bom on the Fourth of July. I mention the wheelchair because it played an unwitting role in what happened next. We made our way to our folding chairs in the garden with our paper plates and cubed cheeses and we watched my stepmother give one of her eloquent speeches and a plea for donations, and there must have been a few other people who spoke but I can't remember who, and then Ron Kovic took the podium, and he was mesmerizing, and when it was all over we stood up to leave, and my grandmother tripped. We'd been sitting in the front row (nepotism has its privileages) and when she tripped she fell smack into the wheelchair ramp that provided Ron Kovic with access to the stage I didn't know that wheelchair ramps have sharp edges, but they do, at least this one did, and it sliced her shin right open. The volume of blood was staggering. I'd like to be able to tell you that I raced into action; that I quickly took control of the situation, tending to my grandmother and calling for the ambulance that was so obviously needed, but I didn't. I sat down and put my head between my knees because I thought I was going to faint. Did I mention the blood? Luckily, somebody did take control of the situation, and that person was Robert Downey Jr. He ordered someone to call an ambulance. Another to bring a glass of water. Another to fetch a blanket. He took off his gorgeous linen jacket and he rolled up his sleeves and he grabbed hold of my grandmother's leg, and then he took that jacket that l'd assumed he'd taken off only to it keep out of the way, and he tied it around her wound. I watched the cream colored linen turn scarlet with her blood. He told her not to wory. He told her it would be alright. He knew, instinctively, how to speak to her, how to distract her, how to play to her vanity He held onto her calf and he whistled. He told her how stunning her legs were. She said to him, to my humiliation: "My granddaughter tells me you're a famous actor but Ive never heard of you." He stayed with her until the ambulance came and then he walked alongside the stretcher holding her hand and telling her she was breaking his heart by leaving the party so early, just as they were getting to know each other. He waved to her as they closed the doors. "Don't forget to call me, Silvia, he said. "VWe'll do lunch." He was a movie star, after all. Believe it or not, I hurried into the ambulance without saying a word. I was too embarrassed and too shy to thank him. We all have things we wish we'd said. Moments we'd like to retum to and do differently. Rarely do we get that chance to make up for those times that words failed us. But I did. Many years later. I should mention here that when Robert Downey Jr. was in prison for being a drug addict (which strikes me as absurd and cruel, but that's the topic for a different essay), I thought of writing to him. Of reminding him of that day when he was humanity personified. When he was the best of what we each can be. When he was the kindest of strangers. But I didn't. Some fifteen years after that garden party, ten years after my grandmother had died and five since he'd been released from prison, I saw him in a restaurant I grew up in Los Angeles where celebrity sightings are commonplace and where I was raised to respect people's privacy and never bother someone while they're out having a meal, but on this day I decided to abandon the code of the native Angeleno, and my own shyness, and I approached his table. I said to him, "I don't have any idea if you remember this.* and I told him the story. He remembered. "I just wanted to thank you," I said. "And I wanted to tell you that it was simply the kindest act I've ever witnessed." He stood up and he took both of my hands in his and he looked into my eyes and he said, "You have absolutely no idea how much I needed to hear that today." you should probably go to TheMetaPicture.com What Robert Downey Jr. Did When He Was At His Worsthttp://advice-animal.tumblr.com/
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This research paper just got rickrolled.http://meme-rage.tumblr.com: SARINGAN, Emanuel Josef V. Malacañang Fleld Trip Hi 166 - Section D Never has the Philippines had a more symbolic seat of power than "the Palace", Seeing it in real life is going to give any Filipino the chills especially those who aspire to hold the coveted position later. We give credit to all those leaders who carried the nation along with its problems by creating a palace that you, as a taxpayer, probably wanted to occupy too. The story the museum holds, which spans from 1750 up to the present however, is more than a picture in the 20 peso bill. It is a symbol which binds us to never again act as individuals in a state but rather as citizens who are part of a democracy. However, going to the Malacañang is figuratively and literally difficult since 1.) Becoming the president is destiny, let alone the fact that 2.) Travelling from Ateneo to Mendiola is not so straightforward. You know that you are near Malacañang when the university belt and a group of rallyists welcome you upon going down the MRT station. Once inside the complex, Mr. Lacierda's jokes made up for the fact that PNoy never showed up. His absence is understandable since he is in the U.S. but I believe that any trip is not going to be complete without the President himself. The tour began and the sights of the old but not yet run down palace amazed me due of the incredible maintenance efforts that sustained the complex for around 3 centuries. We then went to the galleries and experienced a blast from the past as we strode and listened to the guide who knows everything about every thing in the museum. We had to enter and desert offices in the same way our presidents did back then and after a tiring visitation of 15 galleries, you probably would be thankful that we did not have as many presidents as the U.S. Prior to the tour, never have I thought that Malacañang was interesting. I saw the first air con system (which I think is not going to malfunction anytime soon) in the country and the million dollar chandeliers which I could not make out in my imagination what they are for. Such extravagant items that Pres. Quezon bought teases you to think of how tempting it is to hold such powers. Indeed, future presidents made people live and cry during their terms but they are recorded in history nonetheless. The Martial Law chair that FM used never became the ordinary chair that it was after the declaration but was rather immortalized and is going to be a symbol that evokes fear long after its owner died. However, Yin and Yang philosophers will say otherwise since some people benefitted too. Such is the truth behind history, it is never one-sided. Goodbye is difficult to say for presidents who leave Malacañang. Such is also the case for us who will never forget how the staff welcomed and accommodated us wholeheartedly. Somehow the Palace is going to occupy a place in my memory because it has inspired me and renewed my pride so that i could tell the world that I am a Filipino. At the end of all that is told about the Palace's history, it remains as a symbol of public service. Despite our bad political track record where it is normal for people to steal, lie and cheat, it should not discourage our generation to make a change but rather see is as a challenge and an inspiration to serve others. Malacañang is a pedestal high enough for us to see those who are hurt and oppressed and it is upon us whether to act or not. That's all for now Malacañang, I hope to see you again in the future. Lam lookine forward to heing an occupant of vours someday. 'did not have sexual relations with that woman. Uber Humor This research paper just got rickrolled.http://meme-rage.tumblr.com

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The Bar Has Been Raisedhttp://meme-rage.tumblr.com: SARINGAN, Emanuel Josef V. Malacahang Field Trnp Hi 166-Section D Never has the Philippines had a more symbolic seat of power than "the Palace". Seeing it in real ite is going to give any Filipino the chills especially those who aspire to hold the coveted position later. We eive credit to all those leaders who carried the nation along with its problems by creating a palace that you, as a tarpayer, probably wanted to occupy too. The story the museum holds, which spans from 1750 up to the present however, is more than a picture in the 20 peso bill. it is a symbol which binds us to never again act as individuals in a state but rather as citizens who are part of a democracy. However, going to the Malacañang is figuratively and literally difficult since 1.) Becoming the president is destiny, let alone the fact that 2.) Travelling from Ateneo to Mendiola is not so straightforward. You know that you are near Malacalang when the university belt and a group of rallyists wecome you upon going down the MRT station. Once inside the complex, Mr. Lacierda's jokes made up for the fact that PNoy never showed up. His absence is understandable since he is in the U.S. but I believe that any trip is not going to be complete without the President himself. The tour began and the sights of the old but not yet run down palace amazed me due of the incredible maintenance efforts that sustained the complex for around 3 centuries We then went to the galleries and experienced a blast from the past as we strode and listened to the guide who knows everything about every thing in the museum. We had to enter and desert offices in the same way our presidents did back then and after a tiring visitation of 15 galleries, you probably would be thankful that we did not have as many presidents as the US. Prior to the tour, never have I thought that Malacalang was interesting. I saw the first air con system (which I think is not going to malfunction anytime soon) in the country and the million dollar chandeliers which I could not make out in my imagination what they are for. Such extravagant items that Pres. Quezon bought teases you to think of how tempting it is to hold such powers. Indeed, future presidents made people live and cry during their terms but they are recorded in history nonetheless. The Martial Law chair that FM used never became the ordinary chair that it was after the declaration but was rather immortalized and is going to be a symbol that evokes fear long after its owner died. However, Yin and Yang philosophers will say otherwise since some people benefitted too. Such is the truth behind history, it is never one-sided. Goodbye is difficult to say for presidents who leave Malacalang. Such is also the case for us who will never forget how the staff welcomed and accommodated us wholeheartedly. Somehow the Palace is eoing to occupya place in my memory because it has inspired me and renewed my pride so that i could tell the world that I am a Filipino. At the end of all that is told about the Palace's history, it remains as symbol of public service. Despite our bad political track record where it is normal for people to steal le and cheat, it should not discourage our generation to make a change but rather see is as a challenge and an inspiration to serve others. Malacañang is a pedestal high enough for us to see those who are urt and oppressed and it is upon us whether to act or not. That's all for now Malacalang Ihope to see you agairi in the future. I am looking forward to being an occupant of yours someday. YOU SIR Were just Rick Rolled The Bar Has Been Raisedhttp://meme-rage.tumblr.com

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in-mint: wolfpac-k: thesinset: “The Most Beautiful Suicide” 23 year old Evelyn McHale, of Long Island, became engaged in early 1947. On April 30th, she took the train to Easton, PA to spend her fiance’s birthday with him at his college dorm. They planned to be married that June. She boarded a 7:00 AM train back to New York the following morning but never did make it home. Upon her arrival in New York City, she checked into the Governor Clinton Hotel on 31st Street, where she composed a note, and tucked it into her purse. From there, she went to the 86th floor observation deck of the Empire State Building. Just before 10:30 am, on May 1, she calmly, and neatly, folder her coat, placing it against the guard railing alongside her purse and her makeup bag. She then flung herself off the building, falling more than 1,000 feet and landing squarely on the roof of a 1947 Cadillac parked on the street below. The note that Evelyn left in her purse read: “I don’t want anyone in or out of my family to see any part of me. Could you destroy my body by cremation? I beg of you and my family – don’t have any service for me or remembrance for me. My fiance asked me to marry him in June. I don’t think I would make a good wife for anybody. He is much better off without me. Tell my father, I have too many of my mother’s tendencies.” Ironically, for someone who wanted to throw herself into obscurity, never to be remembered, a nearby photographer captured this image within minutes of her demise, and by the following week it appeared as a full page print in Life Magazine. The image of her lifeless body lying gracefully, and peacefully, atop the wreckage, immortalized forever. Sometimes you can simply never get what is that you want in life, even in death. MY ALL TIME FAVORITE PICTURE ON THIS FUCKING SITE.: in-mint: wolfpac-k: thesinset: “The Most Beautiful Suicide” 23 year old Evelyn McHale, of Long Island, became engaged in early 1947. On April 30th, she took the train to Easton, PA to spend her fiance’s birthday with him at his college dorm. They planned to be married that June. She boarded a 7:00 AM train back to New York the following morning but never did make it home. Upon her arrival in New York City, she checked into the Governor Clinton Hotel on 31st Street, where she composed a note, and tucked it into her purse. From there, she went to the 86th floor observation deck of the Empire State Building. Just before 10:30 am, on May 1, she calmly, and neatly, folder her coat, placing it against the guard railing alongside her purse and her makeup bag. She then flung herself off the building, falling more than 1,000 feet and landing squarely on the roof of a 1947 Cadillac parked on the street below. The note that Evelyn left in her purse read: “I don’t want anyone in or out of my family to see any part of me. Could you destroy my body by cremation? I beg of you and my family – don’t have any service for me or remembrance for me. My fiance asked me to marry him in June. I don’t think I would make a good wife for anybody. He is much better off without me. Tell my father, I have too many of my mother’s tendencies.” Ironically, for someone who wanted to throw herself into obscurity, never to be remembered, a nearby photographer captured this image within minutes of her demise, and by the following week it appeared as a full page print in Life Magazine. The image of her lifeless body lying gracefully, and peacefully, atop the wreckage, immortalized forever. Sometimes you can simply never get what is that you want in life, even in death. MY ALL TIME FAVORITE PICTURE ON THIS FUCKING SITE.
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