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clover11-10: breezeinmonochromenight: star-linedsoul: razzleberryjam: ironwoman359: chaos-in-the-making: smugkoalas: allthefandomss: that-catholic-shinobi: gahdamnpunk: American Girl stories were the best tbh Dude, read the books, she and her mom freed themselves in Book 1. We don’t disrespect American Girl in this house Don’t you dare disrespect Addy, or any of my girls for that matter. American Girl used to be legit. Good stories, good dolls, good movies. Felicity’s story was set in the beginnings of the American Revolution, and addressed the conflict that she faced when her loved ones were split between patriots and loyalists. It also covered the effects of animal abuse, and forgiving those who are unforgivable. Samantha’s stories centered around the growth of industrial America, women’s suffrage, child abuse, and corruption in places of power. Also, it emphasises how dramatically adoption into a caring family can turn a life around. Kit’s story is one of my favorites. Her family is hit hard by the Great Depression, and they begin taking in boarders and raise chickens to help make ends meet. Her books include themes of poverty, police brutality, homelessness, prejudice, and the importance of unity in difficult times. Molly’s father, a doctor, is drafted during the Second World War. Throughout her story, friends of hers suffer the loss of their husbands, sons, and brothers overseas. Her mother leaves the traditional housewife position and works full-time to help with the war effort. They also take in an English refugee child, who learns to open up after a life of traumatic experience. American Girl stories have always featured the very harsh realities of America through the years. But they’re always presented honestly, yet in ways that kids can understand. They just go to show that you don’t have to live in a perfect time to be a real American girl. Dont you fucking dare disrespect the American Girls in my house. ESPECIALLY Addy!! That was my first REAL contact with the horrors of slavery, as I read about her father being whipped and sold and her mother escaping with her to freedom, but also how freedom was still a struggle. A slave doll. Please. Read the books. Don’t forget Kirsten, the Swedish immigrant who had to deal with balancing her own culture and learning the english language and customs of her classmates, or Kaya (full name Kaya'aton'my, or She Who Arranges Rocks) , the brave but careless girl from the Nez Perce tribe, or Josefina, the Mexican girl learning to be a healer. And then there are the later dolls, that kids younger than me would have grown up with (I was just outgrowing American Girl as these came out), like Rebecca, the Jewish girl who dreams of becoming an actress in the budding film industry, or  Julie, who fights against her school’s gender policy surrounding sports in the 70s, or  Nanea, the Hawaiian girl whose father worked at Pearl Harbor. These books, these characters, are fantastic pictures into life for girls in America throughout the years, they pull no punches with the horrors that these girls had to face in their different time periods, and in many cases I learned more history from these series than social studies at school. And that’s without even mentioning the “girl of the year” series where characters are created in the modern world to help girls deal with issues like friend problems, moving, or bullying. We do NOT disrespect American Girl in this house. American Girl is probably going to be the only exposure young girls are going to get to history from a female perspective. This is actually kind of important considering that in history classes we dont really get that exposure. We dont hear about what women felt and endured during these time periods cause schools are too busy teaching us about what happened from the male perspective, which is not unimportant, but we need both. Girls need both. These books were such a crucial part of my childhood and shaped my love of history, which still ensures today. These books can be a young girl’s first lessons in diversity and cultural awareness (hopefully burying that insensitive “we’re all Americans” tripe) and looking at history from more perspectives than just that taught in school. They also are an example of how women have ALWAYS been part of history, which some people would rather us not believe. I think Kit and Kaya were the newest American Girls when I started “aging out” of the books, but hearing about some of these kinda makes me want to revisit them! I wasn’t gonna say anything, but you know what? Nah. OP (of the tweet thread) was either a actively trying to start shit or is just a huge fucking moron. Probably both. I’d like to point out that the company that makes American Girl dolls actually doesn’t skimp when doing their research and they don’t make the dolls with the intent to be offensive in any way: I loved American Girl growing up they’re great role models and history lessons so yeah let’s not cancel this for ignorant reasons : clover11-10: breezeinmonochromenight: star-linedsoul: razzleberryjam: ironwoman359: chaos-in-the-making: smugkoalas: allthefandomss: that-catholic-shinobi: gahdamnpunk: American Girl stories were the best tbh Dude, read the books, she and her mom freed themselves in Book 1. We don’t disrespect American Girl in this house Don’t you dare disrespect Addy, or any of my girls for that matter. American Girl used to be legit. Good stories, good dolls, good movies. Felicity’s story was set in the beginnings of the American Revolution, and addressed the conflict that she faced when her loved ones were split between patriots and loyalists. It also covered the effects of animal abuse, and forgiving those who are unforgivable. Samantha’s stories centered around the growth of industrial America, women’s suffrage, child abuse, and corruption in places of power. Also, it emphasises how dramatically adoption into a caring family can turn a life around. Kit’s story is one of my favorites. Her family is hit hard by the Great Depression, and they begin taking in boarders and raise chickens to help make ends meet. Her books include themes of poverty, police brutality, homelessness, prejudice, and the importance of unity in difficult times. Molly’s father, a doctor, is drafted during the Second World War. Throughout her story, friends of hers suffer the loss of their husbands, sons, and brothers overseas. Her mother leaves the traditional housewife position and works full-time to help with the war effort. They also take in an English refugee child, who learns to open up after a life of traumatic experience. American Girl stories have always featured the very harsh realities of America through the years. But they’re always presented honestly, yet in ways that kids can understand. They just go to show that you don’t have to live in a perfect time to be a real American girl. Dont you fucking dare disrespect the American Girls in my house. ESPECIALLY Addy!! That was my first REAL contact with the horrors of slavery, as I read about her father being whipped and sold and her mother escaping with her to freedom, but also how freedom was still a struggle. A slave doll. Please. Read the books. Don’t forget Kirsten, the Swedish immigrant who had to deal with balancing her own culture and learning the english language and customs of her classmates, or Kaya (full name Kaya'aton'my, or She Who Arranges Rocks) , the brave but careless girl from the Nez Perce tribe, or Josefina, the Mexican girl learning to be a healer. And then there are the later dolls, that kids younger than me would have grown up with (I was just outgrowing American Girl as these came out), like Rebecca, the Jewish girl who dreams of becoming an actress in the budding film industry, or  Julie, who fights against her school’s gender policy surrounding sports in the 70s, or  Nanea, the Hawaiian girl whose father worked at Pearl Harbor. These books, these characters, are fantastic pictures into life for girls in America throughout the years, they pull no punches with the horrors that these girls had to face in their different time periods, and in many cases I learned more history from these series than social studies at school. And that’s without even mentioning the “girl of the year” series where characters are created in the modern world to help girls deal with issues like friend problems, moving, or bullying. We do NOT disrespect American Girl in this house. American Girl is probably going to be the only exposure young girls are going to get to history from a female perspective. This is actually kind of important considering that in history classes we dont really get that exposure. We dont hear about what women felt and endured during these time periods cause schools are too busy teaching us about what happened from the male perspective, which is not unimportant, but we need both. Girls need both. These books were such a crucial part of my childhood and shaped my love of history, which still ensures today. These books can be a young girl’s first lessons in diversity and cultural awareness (hopefully burying that insensitive “we’re all Americans” tripe) and looking at history from more perspectives than just that taught in school. They also are an example of how women have ALWAYS been part of history, which some people would rather us not believe. I think Kit and Kaya were the newest American Girls when I started “aging out” of the books, but hearing about some of these kinda makes me want to revisit them! I wasn’t gonna say anything, but you know what? Nah. OP (of the tweet thread) was either a actively trying to start shit or is just a huge fucking moron. Probably both. I’d like to point out that the company that makes American Girl dolls actually doesn’t skimp when doing their research and they don’t make the dolls with the intent to be offensive in any way: I loved American Girl growing up they’re great role models and history lessons so yeah let’s not cancel this for ignorant reasons
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eric-coldfire: broadwaytheanimatedseries: wessasaurus-rex: loosescrewslefty: powerpuff-save-the-day: Powerpuff Girls was actually a show about a group of small children crushing the patriarchy and no one will convince me otherwise Anyone who tries to convince you otherwise obviously wasn’t watching the same show. reasons why i love this show so much  I love that the most tiny feminine delicate sweetheart of the three does the traditionaly masculine chores. Kinda makes me wanna see a teen Bubbles change a tire in a pretty dress and hair bow. Don’t forget the time they had a Misandrist Villain who used feminism as an excuse as to why the PPG should let her go free. Then when the girls themselves started being hateful to men, Ms. Bella had to correct the girls on what real feminism is. Then the PPG schooled the villain on Susan B Anthony and beat the shit out of her. Also don’t forget that while the above mentioned PPG episodes most likely got the show praise from the feminist crowds, the Femme Fatale episode got the show hate mail and death threats from the same crowd. Powerpuff Girls was some good shit. : He--he called me sweet cheeks GIRLS No! NARRATOR Not sweet cheeks! There are only 3 villains capable of such insensitive, derogatoryg and-insulting anquage eric-coldfire: broadwaytheanimatedseries: wessasaurus-rex: loosescrewslefty: powerpuff-save-the-day: Powerpuff Girls was actually a show about a group of small children crushing the patriarchy and no one will convince me otherwise Anyone who tries to convince you otherwise obviously wasn’t watching the same show. reasons why i love this show so much  I love that the most tiny feminine delicate sweetheart of the three does the traditionaly masculine chores. Kinda makes me wanna see a teen Bubbles change a tire in a pretty dress and hair bow. Don’t forget the time they had a Misandrist Villain who used feminism as an excuse as to why the PPG should let her go free. Then when the girls themselves started being hateful to men, Ms. Bella had to correct the girls on what real feminism is. Then the PPG schooled the villain on Susan B Anthony and beat the shit out of her. Also don’t forget that while the above mentioned PPG episodes most likely got the show praise from the feminist crowds, the Femme Fatale episode got the show hate mail and death threats from the same crowd. Powerpuff Girls was some good shit.
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freedomjusticewarrior: yahooentertainment: lmao😂/smh🙄 Eli Bosnick had the best response to this ridiculousness. “If I gave you a bowl of skittles and three of them were poison would you still eat them?” “Are the other skittles human lives?” “What?” “Like. Is there a good chance. A really good chance. I would be saving someone from a war zone and probably their life if I ate a skittle?” “Well sure. But the point-” “I would eat the skittles.” “Ok-well the point is-” “I would GORGE myself on skittles. I would eat every single fucking skittle I could find. I would STUFF myself with skittles. And when I found the poison skittle and died I would make sure to leave behind a legacy of children and of friends who also ate skittle after skittle until there were no skittles to be eaten. And each person who found the poison skittle we would weep for. We would weep for their loss, for their sacrifice, and for the fact that they did not let themselves succumb to fear but made the world a better place by eating skittles. Because your REAL question…the one you hid behind a shitty little inaccurate, insensitive, dehumanizing racist little candy metaphor is, IS MY LIFE MORE IMPORTANT THAN THOUSANDS UPON THOUSANDS OF MEN, WOMEN, AND TERRIFIED CHILDREN… … and what kind of monster would think the answer to that question… is yes?” : If I had a bowl of skittles and I told you just three would kill you. Would you take a handful? That's our Syrian refugee problem. TRUMP MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN! PENCE 2010 Donald Trump Jr. @Donald.TrumpJr·4h 5.8K 8.4K This image says it all. Let's end the politically correct agenda that doesn't put America first. freedomjusticewarrior: yahooentertainment: lmao😂/smh🙄 Eli Bosnick had the best response to this ridiculousness. “If I gave you a bowl of skittles and three of them were poison would you still eat them?” “Are the other skittles human lives?” “What?” “Like. Is there a good chance. A really good chance. I would be saving someone from a war zone and probably their life if I ate a skittle?” “Well sure. But the point-” “I would eat the skittles.” “Ok-well the point is-” “I would GORGE myself on skittles. I would eat every single fucking skittle I could find. I would STUFF myself with skittles. And when I found the poison skittle and died I would make sure to leave behind a legacy of children and of friends who also ate skittle after skittle until there were no skittles to be eaten. And each person who found the poison skittle we would weep for. We would weep for their loss, for their sacrifice, and for the fact that they did not let themselves succumb to fear but made the world a better place by eating skittles. Because your REAL question…the one you hid behind a shitty little inaccurate, insensitive, dehumanizing racist little candy metaphor is, IS MY LIFE MORE IMPORTANT THAN THOUSANDS UPON THOUSANDS OF MEN, WOMEN, AND TERRIFIED CHILDREN… … and what kind of monster would think the answer to that question… is yes?”
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bizarre-transmission: thettasigma: ferventfox: awesome-everyday: internetdumpsterfires: Black people can’t be racist. Ugh, okay. The remark by this black woman was disrespectful and based on race. It was rude, bigoted and uncalled for. But no, in an anti black world, black people do not have the social, political or systemic financial power to be racist. Racism implies that beyond hurting and insulting that asian woman that this black woman is connected to a system that has the power to negatively impact this woman’s existence. That dark skinned black woman who’s an incumbent running for state office likely has about the same amount of systemic power as i do. And furthermore, there could be an argument made that deteoit is chocolate city and perhaps she does have that infrastructure of black networks to truly effect her opponent, but idk I was in Detroit last year and it looks a lot like Brooklyn does now. White and gentrified. White people with money, who control our political systems, finances, and predominant social narratives are claiming urban space like they’re colonizing pioneers looking to take the new world. Detroit isn’t the same anymore. Anyway, black people can be shitty insensitive bigots but we do not have the social capital to be racist, particularly not in the united states. “That dark skinned black woman who’s an incumbent running for state office likely has about the same amount of systemic power as i do.”  Ahahaha: No. A congressperson is the definition of systemic power. You can’t bitch about lack of political power when we are talking about elected politician.  Clearly the world isn’t so anti-black that it couldn’t vote her in.  Chang is also a first generation American, while Scott, to my knowledge, is not, and she specifically made anti-immigrant comments. She also has “power” within the context of her own ethnic community and she used that power to direct racism towards other African-Americans who supported Chang by implying they were somehow traitors, essentially dictating how they ought to act based on their race, particularly Chang’s husband for his interracial marriage (I don’t give a flying fuck what race you are, negative comments about interracial marriage and mixed race people are racist. period. end of story).  Even if I did accept the prejudice + power model or racism (which I don’t as that is neither the etymology or common usage of the word) Cook’s comments would certainly fit the bill. She made race based attacks on people based on types of marginalization that she is exempt from; and did so from a position of power partially gained by the fact that she is exempt from these types of discrimination.   It’s racist. Stop making excuses.  “That dark skinned woman who’s an incumbent running for office likely has about the same amount of systematic power as I do.” Is this person on drugs? They’re claiming that… A political person… A congresswoman… Has no power in the country in which she was elected… By the populace… As a politician. That, or they’re a politician too. Apparently we can say anything now and it makes sense. Huh. Also these remarks are the absolute epitomy of racism and if anyone refuses to see it, they’re not purely misinformed. They are delusional. *literally calls an Asian person ching chong*“How dare you say I’m being racist??” Thank you for attending today’s lecture on cognitive dissonance.: Detroit Rep. Bettie Cook Scott orn Asian opponent: Don't vote for the ching-chong! by Violet lkonomova August 16, 2018 at 11:09 AM comment v bizarre-transmission: thettasigma: ferventfox: awesome-everyday: internetdumpsterfires: Black people can’t be racist. Ugh, okay. The remark by this black woman was disrespectful and based on race. It was rude, bigoted and uncalled for. But no, in an anti black world, black people do not have the social, political or systemic financial power to be racist. Racism implies that beyond hurting and insulting that asian woman that this black woman is connected to a system that has the power to negatively impact this woman’s existence. That dark skinned black woman who’s an incumbent running for state office likely has about the same amount of systemic power as i do. And furthermore, there could be an argument made that deteoit is chocolate city and perhaps she does have that infrastructure of black networks to truly effect her opponent, but idk I was in Detroit last year and it looks a lot like Brooklyn does now. White and gentrified. White people with money, who control our political systems, finances, and predominant social narratives are claiming urban space like they’re colonizing pioneers looking to take the new world. Detroit isn’t the same anymore. Anyway, black people can be shitty insensitive bigots but we do not have the social capital to be racist, particularly not in the united states. “That dark skinned black woman who’s an incumbent running for state office likely has about the same amount of systemic power as i do.”  Ahahaha: No. A congressperson is the definition of systemic power. You can’t bitch about lack of political power when we are talking about elected politician.  Clearly the world isn’t so anti-black that it couldn’t vote her in.  Chang is also a first generation American, while Scott, to my knowledge, is not, and she specifically made anti-immigrant comments. She also has “power” within the context of her own ethnic community and she used that power to direct racism towards other African-Americans who supported Chang by implying they were somehow traitors, essentially dictating how they ought to act based on their race, particularly Chang’s husband for his interracial marriage (I don’t give a flying fuck what race you are, negative comments about interracial marriage and mixed race people are racist. period. end of story).  Even if I did accept the prejudice + power model or racism (which I don’t as that is neither the etymology or common usage of the word) Cook’s comments would certainly fit the bill. She made race based attacks on people based on types of marginalization that she is exempt from; and did so from a position of power partially gained by the fact that she is exempt from these types of discrimination.   It’s racist. Stop making excuses.  “That dark skinned woman who’s an incumbent running for office likely has about the same amount of systematic power as I do.” Is this person on drugs? They’re claiming that… A political person… A congresswoman… Has no power in the country in which she was elected… By the populace… As a politician. That, or they’re a politician too. Apparently we can say anything now and it makes sense. Huh. Also these remarks are the absolute epitomy of racism and if anyone refuses to see it, they’re not purely misinformed. They are delusional. *literally calls an Asian person ching chong*“How dare you say I’m being racist??” Thank you for attending today’s lecture on cognitive dissonance.
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