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bi-trans-alliance: These Joyful Photos Celebrate The Beauty Of Trans Women “As we celebrate Pride, it’s important to remember that trans women of color including Marsha P. Johnson, Sylvia Rivera, and Miss Major Griffin-Gracy were at the forefront of the movement. As model and activist KhrystyAna puts it, “This is Pride month; a month we would not have without trans women of color.  Yet, despite half a century of progress, trans rights still fall behind those of others in the LGBTQ+ community, with trans women of color remaining the most vulnerable members of the queer community.“ KhrystyAna teamed up with photographer Amanda Picotte, model Seana Steele, and stylist Guvanch (all four of whom are part of the LGBTQ+ community) to create this photoshoot celebrating trans women. T he photos are part of the KhrystyAna’s Real Catwalk Project, dedicated to throwing out conventional beauty standards and championing inclusivity. Thirteen trans women, including Steele, posed for photos wearing high fashion pieces in pink, blue, and white to represent the Trans Pride Flag. The 13 women featured are Daniella Carter, Alexandra Lee, Daria Dee, Mojo Disco, Jasmine Infiniti, Alana Jessica, Jari Jones, Shay Neary, Jazmine Shepard, Seana Steele, Garnet Rubio, Angelica Torres, and Nicki Vrotsos. The photos are beautiful and joyous — very different from how the media typically portrays trans women.” (read more) TomboyX Essentials Soft Bra LC, $32 $21.99, available at TomboyX.com; TomboyX Boy Shorts, $25 $18.75, available at TomboyX.com : We just want to love, and be loved, just as everyone else does." "Trans women are women and our rights are simply human rights "You need to not be an ally but a warrior bi-trans-alliance: These Joyful Photos Celebrate The Beauty Of Trans Women “As we celebrate Pride, it’s important to remember that trans women of color including Marsha P. Johnson, Sylvia Rivera, and Miss Major Griffin-Gracy were at the forefront of the movement. As model and activist KhrystyAna puts it, “This is Pride month; a month we would not have without trans women of color.  Yet, despite half a century of progress, trans rights still fall behind those of others in the LGBTQ+ community, with trans women of color remaining the most vulnerable members of the queer community.“ KhrystyAna teamed up with photographer Amanda Picotte, model Seana Steele, and stylist Guvanch (all four of whom are part of the LGBTQ+ community) to create this photoshoot celebrating trans women. T he photos are part of the KhrystyAna’s Real Catwalk Project, dedicated to throwing out conventional beauty standards and championing inclusivity. Thirteen trans women, including Steele, posed for photos wearing high fashion pieces in pink, blue, and white to represent the Trans Pride Flag. The 13 women featured are Daniella Carter, Alexandra Lee, Daria Dee, Mojo Disco, Jasmine Infiniti, Alana Jessica, Jari Jones, Shay Neary, Jazmine Shepard, Seana Steele, Garnet Rubio, Angelica Torres, and Nicki Vrotsos. The photos are beautiful and joyous — very different from how the media typically portrays trans women.” (read more) TomboyX Essentials Soft Bra LC, $32 $21.99, available at TomboyX.com; TomboyX Boy Shorts, $25 $18.75, available at TomboyX.com
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Yass!! 💜🙌🏽😊 Via The San Diego Union-Tribune: "Hector Barajas, who became the face and voice of deported veterans after his own deportation, will be allowed to return to the place he considers home and become a U.S. citizen. Barajas burst into joyous tears seated on a couch Thursday afternoon in front of a large American flag as he read a document informing him that he would be sworn in as a citizen on April 13 in San Diego. “Fourteen years, man,” Hector said, his voice cracking. “Oh my God, this is great. Hallelujah! Hallelujah!”. “I’m coming home, mom!” he added. Barajas was honorably discharged from the Army in 2001 but struggled readjusting to civilian life. He took a plea deal for a charge of shooting at an occupied car in 2002. Because of that conviction, the government took away his green card, and he was deported in 2004 after he finished a prison sentence. “I made bad decisions,” Barajas-Varela told the Union-Tribune last year about that time in his life. “I put myself in that situation... I wouldn’t put myself in that situation again.” Barajas founded the Deported Veterans Support House, known to many as “the Bunker,” in 2013 to support deportees in Tijuana. He became a leader in a push for legislative changes to help U.S. military veterans who had not become citizens avoid deportation and to bring back those who were already removed. He was born in Mexico but raised in Los Angeles from age seven. Since he had a green card, he was able to serve in the Army and was part of the 82nd Airborne Division from 1995 to 2001. At the time, he thought he’d automatically become a citizen, but that was not the case. Members of the military are allowed to apply for citizenship with no waiting period. They still have to fill out the paperwork and pass the tests. Noncitizens who serve in the military are still at risk for deportation if they commit crimes that can cause the U.S. to revoke their green cards.": Justino Mora @JustinoMora1 Hector Barajas, a U.S. veteran, was deported in 2004. Today, our dear friend Hector won his battle against the U.S. government and will be allowed to return home, become a U.S. citizen, and reunite with his family! Hector will be sworn in as a citizen on April 13th in San Diego. Yass!! 💜🙌🏽😊 Via The San Diego Union-Tribune: "Hector Barajas, who became the face and voice of deported veterans after his own deportation, will be allowed to return to the place he considers home and become a U.S. citizen. Barajas burst into joyous tears seated on a couch Thursday afternoon in front of a large American flag as he read a document informing him that he would be sworn in as a citizen on April 13 in San Diego. “Fourteen years, man,” Hector said, his voice cracking. “Oh my God, this is great. Hallelujah! Hallelujah!”. “I’m coming home, mom!” he added. Barajas was honorably discharged from the Army in 2001 but struggled readjusting to civilian life. He took a plea deal for a charge of shooting at an occupied car in 2002. Because of that conviction, the government took away his green card, and he was deported in 2004 after he finished a prison sentence. “I made bad decisions,” Barajas-Varela told the Union-Tribune last year about that time in his life. “I put myself in that situation... I wouldn’t put myself in that situation again.” Barajas founded the Deported Veterans Support House, known to many as “the Bunker,” in 2013 to support deportees in Tijuana. He became a leader in a push for legislative changes to help U.S. military veterans who had not become citizens avoid deportation and to bring back those who were already removed. He was born in Mexico but raised in Los Angeles from age seven. Since he had a green card, he was able to serve in the Army and was part of the 82nd Airborne Division from 1995 to 2001. At the time, he thought he’d automatically become a citizen, but that was not the case. Members of the military are allowed to apply for citizenship with no waiting period. They still have to fill out the paperwork and pass the tests. Noncitizens who serve in the military are still at risk for deportation if they commit crimes that can cause the U.S. to revoke their green cards."

Yass!! 💜🙌🏽😊 Via The San Diego Union-Tribune: "Hector Barajas, who became the face and voice of deported veterans after his own deportatio...

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Living in the past is something many of us do, at least occasionally. Sometimes it’s heartwarming to reminisce about the past and talk about joyous memories. However, periods where thinking about the past in a negative way, in a way that distracts you from the present and keeps you from moving forward, is never beneficial. In life, you must keep looking ahead of yourself, not behind you. You must move forward, looking upward, as if you were a rock climber. You don’t look down, or back, because you know this will only trigger fear and uncertainty. This will paralyze you. So, each and every day you remind yourself never to look back and second guess your life because there is no way to turn back. Each day you remind yourself that the present moment is all you have, and in that moment you have the ability to make changes. You stay focused on what it is you want out of life, not what it is you don’t have currently. You know that change will be hard, but you also know change can bring great joy. Just like a rock climber, moving forward and upward, takes strength, and determination, but in time it get easier because you’ll be stronger. Although it may be hard at first to never look back, you know in time, you will get stronger and it will get easier. - alwaysforward success millionairementor: MILLIONAIRE MENTOR ALWAYS MOVING FORWARD, Living in the past is something many of us do, at least occasionally. Sometimes it’s heartwarming to reminisce about the past and talk about joyous memories. However, periods where thinking about the past in a negative way, in a way that distracts you from the present and keeps you from moving forward, is never beneficial. In life, you must keep looking ahead of yourself, not behind you. You must move forward, looking upward, as if you were a rock climber. You don’t look down, or back, because you know this will only trigger fear and uncertainty. This will paralyze you. So, each and every day you remind yourself never to look back and second guess your life because there is no way to turn back. Each day you remind yourself that the present moment is all you have, and in that moment you have the ability to make changes. You stay focused on what it is you want out of life, not what it is you don’t have currently. You know that change will be hard, but you also know change can bring great joy. Just like a rock climber, moving forward and upward, takes strength, and determination, but in time it get easier because you’ll be stronger. Although it may be hard at first to never look back, you know in time, you will get stronger and it will get easier. - alwaysforward success millionairementor

Living in the past is something many of us do, at least occasionally. Sometimes it’s heartwarming to reminisce about the past and talk ab...

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festivemomentspow:Mariah Carey, 2005: e ka rdes s oon dhsapeaned Age9, Ce hemar le her and he beipedmould hosupesa The awkwardness soon disappeared. Aged 19, Carey was discovered by Tommy Mottola, boss of the multi-national Columbia label. her he married her and he helped mould her into a superstar covered by "Alot of young women relate to these e signed her. introspective, really honest moments about childhood and overcomind After the rise came the inevitable fall: divorce, a (sort of) nervous breakdown, relative failure and ridicule. Finally, there is redemption via a musical renaissance culminating in her 10th album, The Emancipation Of Mimi. The only constant in the morality tale that is her life has been the constant sneering: she's dull, she's dim, she's a diva. "I don't understand that," she admits. "It's a sexist thing, honestly. If a man, say Mick Jagger, is regarded as a sex symbol- not that I'm calling myself a sex symbol, perish the thought - do people doubt that he writes and sings his songs as they do me? I bring the melody, I bring the concept and I bring the lyrics to my songs. I've always been fully involved in my music. Always." That may not be in doubt. Less clear is why she should be so staggeringly popular. After all, others have the looks and the songs and who wouldn't relish being greeted by a platoon of three-foot candles? "I don't know," she confesses. I've worked very hard, but because of my songwriting my fans relate to me on another level. They hear the personal songs such as Looking In from Daydream, Close My Eyes and Outside fronm Butterfly or Petals from Rainbow where I talk about things that have happened to me. A lot of young women relate to these introspective, really honest moments about childhood and overcoming difficulties. That's whyI have such a connection with my fans. "When people say 'your song got me through a moment of my life', that the validation, the real moment of glory, because you've actually touc somebody's life. I always said that if I became famous, it would validate my existence. It didn't. Instead, the fans compel me to keep going Those fans were desperately needed in her darkest hour. After a lavish ceremony in 1993, her marriage to the domineering Mottola soon turned sour "When you're married to someone who's also the head of your label; when his best friend is your lawyer and his lawyer; when your manager used to work for him and when everybody around you is on s payroll feat. What I'm really proud of is that I paid for half of everything in our mansion, down to the lighting bills and the water in the refrigerator. I knoww that I was never kept by anybody. Overall though, I really do look at what happened as a blessing because I had to go through everything so I could write about it and other people could find inspiration. I had to stop with all the worrying and rise above all the negativity that person had brought to my life and to the people around me. icult situation. For a young woman to get out of it is a By the time they divorced five years later, Carey was emotionally spent and had what is routinely referred to as a breakdown: "I was physically and emotionally depleted from having to fight constantly She fled Columbia and signed to Virgin for $80 million, the biggest reco September 11, 2001 and promptly disappeared. Having followed her wallet rather than her instinct, Carey was soon paid off and moved on. "Anybody would have taken that deal, but now I realise that Virgin weren't equipped to deal with the type of music I make." ract in istory. Her Virgin album, Glitter, was released on When she re-surfaced with 2002's Charmbracelet, "that whole moment was about this supposed breakdown. People wanted me to talk about it and to cry on television with Oprah. People were whispering 'be vulnerable in my ear. People cloud your perceptions sometimes especially when youu don't want them to think you're a difficult diva. Ultimately, you have to trust your gut The joyous experience that was recording The Emancipation Of Mimi (Mimi is her pet name) has completed her recovery. "I'm in the best state I've ever been in. I'm in a great moment. I'm very excited and it's a really great time for me." Not bad going for a woman who, when she isn't demanding red carpets, three-foot candles and breaking fingernails, legendarily refuses to use stairs. "Yeah right," she giggles. "I'm the complete opposite. Actually I've been stuck in elevators in Germany, in Japan and in my own apartment close to where the World Trade Center used to be, so I really, really hate elevators. "But I go in them when I have to. Here in Britain, the elevators seem to be much smaller than in America, so it gets me feeling even more uneasy. All the time I'm saying can't we just take the stairs?' I'm always about stairs unless it's 20 flights, l even use stairs when I'm in my heels. Sometimes, I just don't know what people are talking about." T he Emancipation Of Mimi is out now on Def Jam festivemomentspow:Mariah Carey, 2005

festivemomentspow:Mariah Carey, 2005

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