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what-even-is-thiss: bobcatdump: jaskiegg: mellomaia: aphony-cree: beyoncescock: gahdamnpunk: Honestly!!! This is just psychological trauma in the making THANK YOU I’ve asked parents about this and they always say they are teaching the child responsibility and “respect for other people’s things.” If I point out that the child accidentally broke their own toy they always say “I bought them that toy” or “my sister gave that to them.” The problem is that parents view all possessions as not really belonging to the child. A part of them always seems to think that the adult who provided the money is the real owner If a parent breaks a dish they see it as breaking something that already belonged to them, but if a child breaks it they see it as the child breaking something that belonged to the parents People raising children need to realize that household possessions belong to the entire household. If everyone has to use that plate then it belongs to everyone and anyone can have a forgivable accident with it. It’s okay to deem certain possessions as just yours and ask everyone in the house to respect that, but extend the same respect to your child’s belongings Big mood. I know most of these are talking about little little kids, but here’s a tale from middle school. I had forgotten to charge my phone one night, and this was back when cell phones used to beep loudly when they were low on battery. I kept hearing the noise throughout the afternoon and not recognizing what it was because I’d never heard it before. When I finally did realize what it was, I was in science class and my fellow classmates were making presentations. I reached into my bag to try to turn off the phone, and then the low-battery sound went off, loud enough for the teacher to hear it. She confiscated my phone in front of everyone, and I didn’t get it back until after the weekend because it was a Friday. I was really embarrassed, especially to tell my parents. When I got my phone back that Monday, my teacher said it was important for me to learn this lesson now since in college they wouldn’t tolerate phones going off. Fast forward to when I was in college, any time someone’s phone went off, either the professor would tell them to turn it off, or they would say, “Oh, my bad,” and turn it off themselves, and everyone would move on. I even had a professor who danced around while someone’s phone went off, and it was a welcome moment of levity during the lecture. I say all this to say, one of the worst aspects of being a child/teen was adults assuming my intentions were malicious. God I’ve been reading these posts for a while and each time I am struck with the realization that certainly not all parents were supposed to be a parent “I say all this to say, one of the worst aspects of being a child/teen was adults assuming my intentions were malicious.”YES this The problem is, even if families are forgiving the culture around children still effects the child. I use myself as proof of that. A few times between the ages of 4 and 18 I broke things. I broke my grandma’s favorite Christmas ornament. Her first question was: “Are you hurt?” and when I apologized profusely she said “I’m just glad you weren’t hurt.” I broke a few plates. I broke a couple glasses. Every time my dad’s first response was “Did you get cut?” the second step was cleaning up the broken bits, and the third was a discussion of what led to me breaking it and how I could avoid doing that in the future. Same with spills. Same with stains. My biggest “punishment” from my immediate family was being taught how to clean up the mess I made and being shown in detail how to avoid the same mistake in the future if it was avoidable. There were consequences for my actions, but they were the direct result of those actions and nothing much beyond that. My family tried so hard to teach me how to deal with accidents in a healthy way. They were patient. They treated every slip-up as a learning opportunity. They showed me a lot of love. The other adults still got to me. Teachers still punished and publicly shamed me and other students for our mess-ups. Extended family members outside of my small supportive circle still yelled at me. My friends’ parents still got mad. To the point where whenever I messed up my first instinct was that my dad or grandparents were going to punish me, or yell at me, or hit me, even though they never did. They just didn’t. They always responded with patience and an attitude of “I’m glad you’re safe and I want to help you learn from this.” And I was still afraid of messing up. Mortified. Expecting the worst every time. It’s like… we need to change the culture around this, man. Completely. : what-even-is-thiss: bobcatdump: jaskiegg: mellomaia: aphony-cree: beyoncescock: gahdamnpunk: Honestly!!! This is just psychological trauma in the making THANK YOU I’ve asked parents about this and they always say they are teaching the child responsibility and “respect for other people’s things.” If I point out that the child accidentally broke their own toy they always say “I bought them that toy” or “my sister gave that to them.” The problem is that parents view all possessions as not really belonging to the child. A part of them always seems to think that the adult who provided the money is the real owner If a parent breaks a dish they see it as breaking something that already belonged to them, but if a child breaks it they see it as the child breaking something that belonged to the parents People raising children need to realize that household possessions belong to the entire household. If everyone has to use that plate then it belongs to everyone and anyone can have a forgivable accident with it. It’s okay to deem certain possessions as just yours and ask everyone in the house to respect that, but extend the same respect to your child’s belongings Big mood. I know most of these are talking about little little kids, but here’s a tale from middle school. I had forgotten to charge my phone one night, and this was back when cell phones used to beep loudly when they were low on battery. I kept hearing the noise throughout the afternoon and not recognizing what it was because I’d never heard it before. When I finally did realize what it was, I was in science class and my fellow classmates were making presentations. I reached into my bag to try to turn off the phone, and then the low-battery sound went off, loud enough for the teacher to hear it. She confiscated my phone in front of everyone, and I didn’t get it back until after the weekend because it was a Friday. I was really embarrassed, especially to tell my parents. When I got my phone back that Monday, my teacher said it was important for me to learn this lesson now since in college they wouldn’t tolerate phones going off. Fast forward to when I was in college, any time someone’s phone went off, either the professor would tell them to turn it off, or they would say, “Oh, my bad,” and turn it off themselves, and everyone would move on. I even had a professor who danced around while someone’s phone went off, and it was a welcome moment of levity during the lecture. I say all this to say, one of the worst aspects of being a child/teen was adults assuming my intentions were malicious. God I’ve been reading these posts for a while and each time I am struck with the realization that certainly not all parents were supposed to be a parent “I say all this to say, one of the worst aspects of being a child/teen was adults assuming my intentions were malicious.”YES this The problem is, even if families are forgiving the culture around children still effects the child. I use myself as proof of that. A few times between the ages of 4 and 18 I broke things. I broke my grandma’s favorite Christmas ornament. Her first question was: “Are you hurt?” and when I apologized profusely she said “I’m just glad you weren’t hurt.” I broke a few plates. I broke a couple glasses. Every time my dad’s first response was “Did you get cut?” the second step was cleaning up the broken bits, and the third was a discussion of what led to me breaking it and how I could avoid doing that in the future. Same with spills. Same with stains. My biggest “punishment” from my immediate family was being taught how to clean up the mess I made and being shown in detail how to avoid the same mistake in the future if it was avoidable. There were consequences for my actions, but they were the direct result of those actions and nothing much beyond that. My family tried so hard to teach me how to deal with accidents in a healthy way. They were patient. They treated every slip-up as a learning opportunity. They showed me a lot of love. The other adults still got to me. Teachers still punished and publicly shamed me and other students for our mess-ups. Extended family members outside of my small supportive circle still yelled at me. My friends’ parents still got mad. To the point where whenever I messed up my first instinct was that my dad or grandparents were going to punish me, or yell at me, or hit me, even though they never did. They just didn’t. They always responded with patience and an attitude of “I’m glad you’re safe and I want to help you learn from this.” And I was still afraid of messing up. Mortified. Expecting the worst every time. It’s like… we need to change the culture around this, man. Completely.

what-even-is-thiss: bobcatdump: jaskiegg: mellomaia: aphony-cree: beyoncescock: gahdamnpunk: Honestly!!! This is just psychologica...

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blue-author: turakamu: lennybaby2: lanie-love09: micdotcom: This white woman’s shocking account of police brutality reveals the importance of the #BlackLivesMatter movement Molly Suzanna shared a story on Facebook that she had never told before: when she was 19, she ran a red light while crying, then was pulled over and forcefully removed and beaten by a police officer. She explains in the letter that she believes her situation would have been even worse had she been black — and she ends the letter with an important call to action. The public needs to hear more stories like this as well. Wow. This is horrifying. Cops are drunk on power. Add any ism to that, you have a bunch of abusive, gun wielding, trained to kill, non empathetic, killers running around. This woman got hauled out of a window, beaten, stripped, tortured, and humiliated, and she still is able to understand how white privilege saved her life. : blue-author: turakamu: lennybaby2: lanie-love09: micdotcom: This white woman’s shocking account of police brutality reveals the importance of the #BlackLivesMatter movement Molly Suzanna shared a story on Facebook that she had never told before: when she was 19, she ran a red light while crying, then was pulled over and forcefully removed and beaten by a police officer. She explains in the letter that she believes her situation would have been even worse had she been black — and she ends the letter with an important call to action. The public needs to hear more stories like this as well. Wow. This is horrifying. Cops are drunk on power. Add any ism to that, you have a bunch of abusive, gun wielding, trained to kill, non empathetic, killers running around. This woman got hauled out of a window, beaten, stripped, tortured, and humiliated, and she still is able to understand how white privilege saved her life.

blue-author: turakamu: lennybaby2: lanie-love09: micdotcom: This white woman’s shocking account of police brutality reveals the impor...

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ups-dogs: On this day I was challenged…and on this day, I prevailed.Beset upon on all sides by this veritable menagerie of merciless, multi-species moochers, I was determined to dig deep in order to satisfy their dissimilar and daunting dietary demands. My time in the Boy Scouts taught me “be prepared” and I have carried that lesson into my career at UPS by always maintaining a supply of carrots for horses, granola bars for the swine, and, of course, Milk Bones for the dogs.I am proud to say that I was finally rewarded for my preparations by this powerful example of pure photographic perfection; a profound, poignant and pastoral picture of a pittie, piggy and pony posse….all in one shot!A lesser driver would have squandered this golden opportunity by simply retreating, leaving nothing but a trail of hungry and frustrated animals in his wake. But not I. Thirty one years of experience plying my trade on the lonely back roads of Newberg, Oregon have taught me a valuable lesson; that excuses are never an option. I have a solemn duty to uphold. The uniform that I proudly wear says “UPS” and that brand name stands for something; Unlimited Puppypiggypony Snacks!By Scott Hodges.: ups-dogs: On this day I was challenged…and on this day, I prevailed.Beset upon on all sides by this veritable menagerie of merciless, multi-species moochers, I was determined to dig deep in order to satisfy their dissimilar and daunting dietary demands. My time in the Boy Scouts taught me “be prepared” and I have carried that lesson into my career at UPS by always maintaining a supply of carrots for horses, granola bars for the swine, and, of course, Milk Bones for the dogs.I am proud to say that I was finally rewarded for my preparations by this powerful example of pure photographic perfection; a profound, poignant and pastoral picture of a pittie, piggy and pony posse….all in one shot!A lesser driver would have squandered this golden opportunity by simply retreating, leaving nothing but a trail of hungry and frustrated animals in his wake. But not I. Thirty one years of experience plying my trade on the lonely back roads of Newberg, Oregon have taught me a valuable lesson; that excuses are never an option. I have a solemn duty to uphold. The uniform that I proudly wear says “UPS” and that brand name stands for something; Unlimited Puppypiggypony Snacks!By Scott Hodges.

ups-dogs: On this day I was challenged…and on this day, I prevailed.Beset upon on all sides by this veritable menagerie of merciless, mu...

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artbymoga: onefitmodel: rootandrock: timeofthedecade: bigdaddyg-wil: this guy pulled out his dick in front of like 5 billion feminist protestors holy shit Some context for the idiots claiming the women are overreacting: This occurred at a Slut Walk. For those not familiar with it, the Slut Walk is basically a peaceful protest seeking to eliminate the rape apologism so prevalent in society. The basis is that no woman is “asking for it,” with “it” being rape. It’s not a feminist protest; it’s a human rights protest. Many of the protesters, as you can probably imagine, have dealt with sexual harassment or rape in their own lives. Many of them have structured their daily activities to avoid being raped. The gathering is supposed to be a place for them to feel empowered and able to recover in the company of those who understand what they’ve been through or who will not blame them. Nobody at a Slut Walk will tell a survivor that it’s her fault. They will not ask what she was wearing to provoke her attacker. Nobody will say she had too much to drink. Nobody will tell the men in the group that they are inherently rapists themselves, and nobody will tell a male survivor that his experience “wasn’t really rape.” Then, this fellow comes along. He sees this gathering of survivors and their supporters, and to him, it’s a joke. He sees feminazis. He sees girls who are taking “a bit of fun” too seriously. And what does he do? He exposes himself to this group of survivors and supporters - some of whom are, in fact, underage. He sexually harasses literally hundreds of women in one act. Aside from public indecency, there was cruel intent in his actions. He wanted to make them uncomfortable. He wanted to “put them in their place.” Other photos from this event show him flipping the protesters off and laughing at their anger. And there are still people defending his actions. There are those who still feel like these women were asking for itand that they deserved to be harassed for trying to claim they weren’t. There are those who feel that women should be taught a lesson this way, and they applaud this man’s actions. So no, he didn’t pull out his dick in front of feminist protesters. He harassed dozens - if not hundreds - of rape survivors. The reaction to his actions alone outline the purpose of the Slut Walk. For those of you still doubting whether what he did was wrong (and I do wonder if there’s something wrong with you, if you have doubts), let me give you an analogous situation. Imagine a gathering of black civil rights activists. Imagine Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, Rosa Parks, and all their colleagues gathered together to demonstrate that being black did not make them lesser people. That being black and living in the South did not mean they were “asking” to be the target of hate crimes. And at this gathering, a white man decides he should teach them a lesson by pointedly hanging a noose from the nearest tree and laughing at their anger. And other white men, laughing along with him, commend him for taking these activists down a peg. That’s what happened here. It’s not an “OMG, I can’t believe he did that!” moment. It’s an “OMG, there are people who think this is okay” moment. And the fact is, it’s not. It never will be. And that’s the take home message of this ridiculous rant I’ve written up. And this is why we still need feminism. this made me cry holy shit That was hands down one of the most well-written and beautiful responses I have had the pleasure to read. Thank you : artbymoga: onefitmodel: rootandrock: timeofthedecade: bigdaddyg-wil: this guy pulled out his dick in front of like 5 billion feminist protestors holy shit Some context for the idiots claiming the women are overreacting: This occurred at a Slut Walk. For those not familiar with it, the Slut Walk is basically a peaceful protest seeking to eliminate the rape apologism so prevalent in society. The basis is that no woman is “asking for it,” with “it” being rape. It’s not a feminist protest; it’s a human rights protest. Many of the protesters, as you can probably imagine, have dealt with sexual harassment or rape in their own lives. Many of them have structured their daily activities to avoid being raped. The gathering is supposed to be a place for them to feel empowered and able to recover in the company of those who understand what they’ve been through or who will not blame them. Nobody at a Slut Walk will tell a survivor that it’s her fault. They will not ask what she was wearing to provoke her attacker. Nobody will say she had too much to drink. Nobody will tell the men in the group that they are inherently rapists themselves, and nobody will tell a male survivor that his experience “wasn’t really rape.” Then, this fellow comes along. He sees this gathering of survivors and their supporters, and to him, it’s a joke. He sees feminazis. He sees girls who are taking “a bit of fun” too seriously. And what does he do? He exposes himself to this group of survivors and supporters - some of whom are, in fact, underage. He sexually harasses literally hundreds of women in one act. Aside from public indecency, there was cruel intent in his actions. He wanted to make them uncomfortable. He wanted to “put them in their place.” Other photos from this event show him flipping the protesters off and laughing at their anger. And there are still people defending his actions. There are those who still feel like these women were asking for itand that they deserved to be harassed for trying to claim they weren’t. There are those who feel that women should be taught a lesson this way, and they applaud this man’s actions. So no, he didn’t pull out his dick in front of feminist protesters. He harassed dozens - if not hundreds - of rape survivors. The reaction to his actions alone outline the purpose of the Slut Walk. For those of you still doubting whether what he did was wrong (and I do wonder if there’s something wrong with you, if you have doubts), let me give you an analogous situation. Imagine a gathering of black civil rights activists. Imagine Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, Rosa Parks, and all their colleagues gathered together to demonstrate that being black did not make them lesser people. That being black and living in the South did not mean they were “asking” to be the target of hate crimes. And at this gathering, a white man decides he should teach them a lesson by pointedly hanging a noose from the nearest tree and laughing at their anger. And other white men, laughing along with him, commend him for taking these activists down a peg. That’s what happened here. It’s not an “OMG, I can’t believe he did that!” moment. It’s an “OMG, there are people who think this is okay” moment. And the fact is, it’s not. It never will be. And that’s the take home message of this ridiculous rant I’ve written up. And this is why we still need feminism. this made me cry holy shit That was hands down one of the most well-written and beautiful responses I have had the pleasure to read. Thank you
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thebaconsandwichofregret: asexual-not-asexual-detective: Am I the only one who thinks that hitting a kid and abuse are different things? Like, if I ever had a kid, I wouldn’t spank their ass raw or something like that. But a bop on the mouth or the ear pull or a smack upside the head? Yea. Those are behavior modifiers. Except they’re not. The studies done by the trained psychologists in this joke show that little kids don’t associate being hit with the thing they’ve done wrong. Very small children only understand consequences that are directly caused by the thing they did. Steal a biscuit, biscuit tastes good. Then for no reason mummy hit me. Very different to stole a biscuit, now no biscuit after dinner because I stole a biscuit. And they also show that when a child is old enough to understand why they are being hit that non-physical punishment is equally as effective and less mentally harmful in the long run. Do you know who benefits the most from hitting as a punishment? The parent. It gives a satisfaction rush. Parents do it because it makes them feel good. Basically kids have two stages: too young to understand why they are being hit so physical punishment is useless for anything other than teaching a child that bigger stronger people can hit you whenever they like (Which sounds like the same lesson you would learn from abuse) And the second stage is old enough to be reasoned with so many punishment options are available and you chose physical violence because it makes *you* feel better, which is an abusive action. The only time a person should ever use violence against another human being, of any age, is to stop that person from being violent themselves. : thebaconsandwichofregret: asexual-not-asexual-detective: Am I the only one who thinks that hitting a kid and abuse are different things? Like, if I ever had a kid, I wouldn’t spank their ass raw or something like that. But a bop on the mouth or the ear pull or a smack upside the head? Yea. Those are behavior modifiers. Except they’re not. The studies done by the trained psychologists in this joke show that little kids don’t associate being hit with the thing they’ve done wrong. Very small children only understand consequences that are directly caused by the thing they did. Steal a biscuit, biscuit tastes good. Then for no reason mummy hit me. Very different to stole a biscuit, now no biscuit after dinner because I stole a biscuit. And they also show that when a child is old enough to understand why they are being hit that non-physical punishment is equally as effective and less mentally harmful in the long run. Do you know who benefits the most from hitting as a punishment? The parent. It gives a satisfaction rush. Parents do it because it makes them feel good. Basically kids have two stages: too young to understand why they are being hit so physical punishment is useless for anything other than teaching a child that bigger stronger people can hit you whenever they like (Which sounds like the same lesson you would learn from abuse) And the second stage is old enough to be reasoned with so many punishment options are available and you chose physical violence because it makes *you* feel better, which is an abusive action. The only time a person should ever use violence against another human being, of any age, is to stop that person from being violent themselves.
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philosophy-and-coffee: positive-memes: Caring community   This is the kind of shit people did back in the Depression. When mortgage holds would try to sell a farm, everyone in the community showed up and strong armed any serious bidders away. They had the ‘penny auction’ tactic, where farmers would bid absurdly small amounts on farm equipment and land (while glaring intensely) until the auctioneer realized they needed to take what they were getting, or get their legs broken. This kind of stuff saved so many farms, they’d buy off 500+ dollar mortgages (which were huge amounts back then) for less than 100 dollars and give it back to the farm owners.    The lesson to take away is that only direct action and community organizing can help in such dire times. : philosophy-and-coffee: positive-memes: Caring community   This is the kind of shit people did back in the Depression. When mortgage holds would try to sell a farm, everyone in the community showed up and strong armed any serious bidders away. They had the ‘penny auction’ tactic, where farmers would bid absurdly small amounts on farm equipment and land (while glaring intensely) until the auctioneer realized they needed to take what they were getting, or get their legs broken. This kind of stuff saved so many farms, they’d buy off 500+ dollar mortgages (which were huge amounts back then) for less than 100 dollars and give it back to the farm owners.    The lesson to take away is that only direct action and community organizing can help in such dire times.
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nestofstraightlines: jabberwockypie: kyraneko: darkmagyk: seananmcguire: nokeek: Dorothy just wanted something that she could believe in,A gray dustbowl girl in a life she was better off leavin’.She made her escape, went from gray into green,And she could have got clear, and she could have got clean,But she chose to be good and go back to the gray Kansas skyWhere color’s a fable and freedom’s a fairy tale lie. Alice got lost, and I guess that we really can’t blame her;They say she got tangled and tied in the lies that became her.They say she went mad, and she never complained,For there’s peace of a kind in a life unconstrained.She gives Cheshire kisses, she’s easy with white rabbit smiles,And she’ll never be free, but she’s won herself safe for a while. Susan and Lucy were queens, and they ruled well and proudly.They honored their land and their lord, rang the bells long and loudly.They never once asked to return to their livesTo be children and chattel and mothers and wives,But the land cast them out in a lesson that only one learned;And one queen said ‘I am not a toy’, and she never returned. Mandy’s a pirate, and Mia weaves silk shrouds for faeries,And Deborah will pour you red wine pressed from sweet poisoned berries.Kate poses riddles and Mary plays tricks,While Kaia builds towers from brambles and sticks,And the rules that we live by are simple and clear:Be wicked and lovely and don’t live in fear        Dorothy, Alice and Wendy and Jane,        Susan and Lucy, we’re calling your names,        All the Lost Girls who came out of the rain        And chose to go back on the shelf.        Tinker Bell says, and I find I agree        You have to break rules if you want to break free.        So do as you like  — we’re determined to be        Wicked girls saving ourselves. For we will be wicked and we will be fairAnd they’ll call us such names, and we really won’t care,So go, tell your Wendys, your Susans, your Janes,There’s a place they can go if they’re tired of chains,And our roads may be golden, or broken, or lost,But we’ll walk on them willingly, knowing the cost  — We won’t take our place on the shelves.It’s better to fly and it’s better to dieSay the wicked girls saving ourselves. (Seanan McGuire) This is breathtaking. I heard this poem once a million years ago, I have been looking for it ever since, and had now found it.  I love it so much more then I remember.  You might be interested to know that she set it to music and it’s also a song. @darkmagyk And people have made fanvids set to it! (The CD is out of print right now - I have it and I love it so much, but I she’s re-printing a different one … soonish?) Mmmmm I get it but I’m not sure about the implication that real life is an inherent punishment for girls, and I find this kind of feminist take a little reactionary and keen to flatten out female characters and their stories into simple terms to make a kind of Yass Queen point. Anyway here’s a video I love examining the differences in feminist-related theming between the book and movie of The Wizard of Oz https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hz15yFVF1TI And here’s a Hark! A Vagrant comic that is very much that’s-it-that’s the-book re. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland: : TA 轉p ETER PAN PIPPILONGSTOKING+LINDGE ATHE WIZARD ERANK Jot OZ OSAUM the Lion ie i theterdenne C.S. LEWIS HOKEEK.TUMBLR.COM Potter LERBY HED HARRY PLEF nestofstraightlines: jabberwockypie: kyraneko: darkmagyk: seananmcguire: nokeek: Dorothy just wanted something that she could believe in,A gray dustbowl girl in a life she was better off leavin’.She made her escape, went from gray into green,And she could have got clear, and she could have got clean,But she chose to be good and go back to the gray Kansas skyWhere color’s a fable and freedom’s a fairy tale lie. Alice got lost, and I guess that we really can’t blame her;They say she got tangled and tied in the lies that became her.They say she went mad, and she never complained,For there’s peace of a kind in a life unconstrained.She gives Cheshire kisses, she’s easy with white rabbit smiles,And she’ll never be free, but she’s won herself safe for a while. Susan and Lucy were queens, and they ruled well and proudly.They honored their land and their lord, rang the bells long and loudly.They never once asked to return to their livesTo be children and chattel and mothers and wives,But the land cast them out in a lesson that only one learned;And one queen said ‘I am not a toy’, and she never returned. Mandy’s a pirate, and Mia weaves silk shrouds for faeries,And Deborah will pour you red wine pressed from sweet poisoned berries.Kate poses riddles and Mary plays tricks,While Kaia builds towers from brambles and sticks,And the rules that we live by are simple and clear:Be wicked and lovely and don’t live in fear        Dorothy, Alice and Wendy and Jane,        Susan and Lucy, we’re calling your names,        All the Lost Girls who came out of the rain        And chose to go back on the shelf.        Tinker Bell says, and I find I agree        You have to break rules if you want to break free.        So do as you like  — we’re determined to be        Wicked girls saving ourselves. For we will be wicked and we will be fairAnd they’ll call us such names, and we really won’t care,So go, tell your Wendys, your Susans, your Janes,There’s a place they can go if they’re tired of chains,And our roads may be golden, or broken, or lost,But we’ll walk on them willingly, knowing the cost  — We won’t take our place on the shelves.It’s better to fly and it’s better to dieSay the wicked girls saving ourselves. (Seanan McGuire) This is breathtaking. I heard this poem once a million years ago, I have been looking for it ever since, and had now found it.  I love it so much more then I remember.  You might be interested to know that she set it to music and it’s also a song. @darkmagyk And people have made fanvids set to it! (The CD is out of print right now - I have it and I love it so much, but I she’s re-printing a different one … soonish?) Mmmmm I get it but I’m not sure about the implication that real life is an inherent punishment for girls, and I find this kind of feminist take a little reactionary and keen to flatten out female characters and their stories into simple terms to make a kind of Yass Queen point. Anyway here’s a video I love examining the differences in feminist-related theming between the book and movie of The Wizard of Oz https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hz15yFVF1TI And here’s a Hark! A Vagrant comic that is very much that’s-it-that’s the-book re. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland:

nestofstraightlines: jabberwockypie: kyraneko: darkmagyk: seananmcguire: nokeek: Dorothy just wanted something that she could belie...

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