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glassceilingbreakers: Our Laws Period-Shame Women—So I’m Going to Change Them: An op-ed by Congresswoman Grace Meng. Dd you know that there are girls who skip school when they get their periods? If they can’t afford pads or tampons and don’t want anyone to see they’ve stained their clothes, they may feel like they have no choice. That’s not just something that happens in developing countries. It happens right here in the United States. Right in my home district of Queens, New York. I didn’t know that until recently. Growing up, nobody talked about their periods, even if they were having problems; there was a certain taboo surrounding the issue. That all went out the window in 2015, the year “the period went public.” Female elected officials and activists began to focus their attention on the tampon tax (which is a state issue); I turned my attention to how I could help women across the country. It was exciting to see coverage of the tampon tax pop up everywhere, including in Marie Claire. Last year, YouTube personality Ingrid Nilsen even asked President Obama about the tampon tax,and he was as mystified as the rest of us. But as great as the advocacy has been to eliminate sales tax on tampons and pads, menstrual equity issues run much deeper. Many women and girls across the country struggle with more than just cost, and I was constantly asking myself what I could do to help them. Eliminating the tampon tax is not enough for the 86 percent of women who start their period unexpectedly without necessary supplies. It is not enough for the low income women who cannot afford menstrual products on their own and can only get them through food pantries. It is not enough for the female inmates and homeless women who are denied these products or have them rationed. Can you imagine being told you can’t have any more pads even though you still have your period? Most Americans—across all income levels—believe that feminine hygiene products are basic necessities. So why is it still so hard to afford and access them? This week I introduced the Menstrual Equity for All Act of 2017, the first legislation in Congress to deal with menstrual hygiene product access. It has five different parts aimed at addressing all of these issues. You would not believe what female inmates go through to access menstrual hygiene products. The ACLU of Michigan filed a federal lawsuit on behalf of 8 female prisoners at Muskegon County Jail because (among other things) the prison denied inmates access to menstrual hygiene products, a condition considered inhumane and degrading. Female inmates in Connecticut only get five pads per week to split with their bunkmate, which means they may have to use a single pad for multiple days. I cannot imagine how humiliating that must feel. My bill would require each state to give female inmates and detainees as many tampons or pads as they need, whenever they need them—at no cost. If Congress has to deny states certain federal funds to get their prisons to change their current horrendous practices, then so be it. Homeless women also face serious problems when on their period. A report issued in 2014 said that homeless women experience the “degrading condition of not having access to adequate facilities during their menstrual cycles to be able to use hygiene products and change them on a regular basis.” Some homeless women resort to using rags or…nothing. Congress should be outraged by these conditions. Shelters should be able to use federal grant money to purchase tampons or pads—that is exactly what my bill ensures. Once I started learning about all of the ways women and girls struggle to access menstrual hygiene products during their periods, I realized how much I took my own circumstances for granted. I am grateful to be in a position to advocate on this issue and effect change. My bill may be the first effort at addressing menstrual equity on the national stage, but it won’t be the last. Especially not if passionate and talented women like you run for office and promote issues like these when you get there. We cannot stop until we reach real menstrual equity for women and girls everywhere. Join me in this fight and, together, we can win. Editor’s Note: The Menstrual Equity for All Act of 2017 (H.R. 972) currently has 21 co-sponsors, all Democrats. Contact your representative to tell him or her to become a co-sponsor. : marie claire Our Laws Period-Shame Women-So I'm Going to Change Them An op-ed by Congresswoman Grace Meng. P Alamy by congresswoman grace meng glassceilingbreakers: Our Laws Period-Shame Women—So I’m Going to Change Them: An op-ed by Congresswoman Grace Meng. Dd you know that there are girls who skip school when they get their periods? If they can’t afford pads or tampons and don’t want anyone to see they’ve stained their clothes, they may feel like they have no choice. That’s not just something that happens in developing countries. It happens right here in the United States. Right in my home district of Queens, New York. I didn’t know that until recently. Growing up, nobody talked about their periods, even if they were having problems; there was a certain taboo surrounding the issue. That all went out the window in 2015, the year “the period went public.” Female elected officials and activists began to focus their attention on the tampon tax (which is a state issue); I turned my attention to how I could help women across the country. It was exciting to see coverage of the tampon tax pop up everywhere, including in Marie Claire. Last year, YouTube personality Ingrid Nilsen even asked President Obama about the tampon tax,and he was as mystified as the rest of us. But as great as the advocacy has been to eliminate sales tax on tampons and pads, menstrual equity issues run much deeper. Many women and girls across the country struggle with more than just cost, and I was constantly asking myself what I could do to help them. Eliminating the tampon tax is not enough for the 86 percent of women who start their period unexpectedly without necessary supplies. It is not enough for the low income women who cannot afford menstrual products on their own and can only get them through food pantries. It is not enough for the female inmates and homeless women who are denied these products or have them rationed. Can you imagine being told you can’t have any more pads even though you still have your period? Most Americans—across all income levels—believe that feminine hygiene products are basic necessities. So why is it still so hard to afford and access them? This week I introduced the Menstrual Equity for All Act of 2017, the first legislation in Congress to deal with menstrual hygiene product access. It has five different parts aimed at addressing all of these issues. You would not believe what female inmates go through to access menstrual hygiene products. The ACLU of Michigan filed a federal lawsuit on behalf of 8 female prisoners at Muskegon County Jail because (among other things) the prison denied inmates access to menstrual hygiene products, a condition considered inhumane and degrading. Female inmates in Connecticut only get five pads per week to split with their bunkmate, which means they may have to use a single pad for multiple days. I cannot imagine how humiliating that must feel. My bill would require each state to give female inmates and detainees as many tampons or pads as they need, whenever they need them—at no cost. If Congress has to deny states certain federal funds to get their prisons to change their current horrendous practices, then so be it. Homeless women also face serious problems when on their period. A report issued in 2014 said that homeless women experience the “degrading condition of not having access to adequate facilities during their menstrual cycles to be able to use hygiene products and change them on a regular basis.” Some homeless women resort to using rags or…nothing. Congress should be outraged by these conditions. Shelters should be able to use federal grant money to purchase tampons or pads—that is exactly what my bill ensures. Once I started learning about all of the ways women and girls struggle to access menstrual hygiene products during their periods, I realized how much I took my own circumstances for granted. I am grateful to be in a position to advocate on this issue and effect change. My bill may be the first effort at addressing menstrual equity on the national stage, but it won’t be the last. Especially not if passionate and talented women like you run for office and promote issues like these when you get there. We cannot stop until we reach real menstrual equity for women and girls everywhere. Join me in this fight and, together, we can win. Editor’s Note: The Menstrual Equity for All Act of 2017 (H.R. 972) currently has 21 co-sponsors, all Democrats. Contact your representative to tell him or her to become a co-sponsor.

glassceilingbreakers: Our Laws Period-Shame Women—So I’m Going to Change Them: An op-ed by Congresswoman Grace Meng. Dd you know that th...

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misscatholmes: nerdycommunity: igglooaustralia: Wow y'all really have Kim out here thinking that this is all her fault. That she deserved to be dragged out of her bed in the middle of the night, tied up, and thrown into a bathtub scared for her life, because of her wealth.   This “well she shouldn’t have…” done this or that, victim-blaming mentality has absolutely got to stop. No one is doing this to you guys when you post whatever it is that you just got on IG. I don’t care how much you don’t like The Kardashians. Celebrities are humans too, and people should be able to have their belongings in peace, no matter how wealthy or poor. No one should be scared to live their life ^^ What annoys me is that no one ever tells males to stop flaunting their wealth, ever. Do people tell Lil Wayne, or Eminem to not flash their expensive shit? No. I’m not a Kardashian fan, at all, but she didn’t deserve this. No one does. : o00 Sprint 6% 6:02 PM < Tweet marie Marie Claire daire @marieclaire Kim Kardashian Blames Herself for the Paris Attack bit.ly/2dwjM3w 10/5/16, 6:36 PM 105 RETWEETS 258 LIKES @jennersaint 22h @marieclaire nooooo:( Reply to Marie Claire Notifications Home Moments Messages Мe will @SUNPRINCE this is what happens when yall constantly blame women for every single thing, even when they're the victim. fuck y.. twitter.com/i/web/ status/7.. Marie Claire @marieclaire Kim Kardashian Blames Herself for the Paris Attack bit.ly/2dwjM3w 10/6/16, 11:21 AM 2,664 RETWEETS 2,822 LIKES TMZ TMZ @TMZ Kim Kardashian -- My Wealth Won't Be in Your Face Anymore Kim Kardashian -- My Wealth Won't Be in Your Face Anymore tmz.com 10/6/16, 2:45 PM Kim Kardashian has found God at a 2262 discount - because after the robbery wealth will no longer be the driver of her brand Sources close to Kim tell us... she actually agrees with critics who say she put a target on her back by flaunting her wealth and jewelry on social media. A number of people have been critical of Kim for posing with her $4.5 million diamond ring in the apartment shortly before the hit. We're told Kim is taking a month off work and when she returns she's pulling back in a big way on social media. She won't be displaying her personal wealth .. and she'll even be less ostentatious with the promotion of her fashion Kim has been rocked to her core after being tied up with a gun to her head. She's saying privately.. "Material things mean nothing. It's not all about the money," adding, "It's not worth it." misscatholmes: nerdycommunity: igglooaustralia: Wow y'all really have Kim out here thinking that this is all her fault. That she deserved to be dragged out of her bed in the middle of the night, tied up, and thrown into a bathtub scared for her life, because of her wealth.   This “well she shouldn’t have…” done this or that, victim-blaming mentality has absolutely got to stop. No one is doing this to you guys when you post whatever it is that you just got on IG. I don’t care how much you don’t like The Kardashians. Celebrities are humans too, and people should be able to have their belongings in peace, no matter how wealthy or poor. No one should be scared to live their life ^^ What annoys me is that no one ever tells males to stop flaunting their wealth, ever. Do people tell Lil Wayne, or Eminem to not flash their expensive shit? No. I’m not a Kardashian fan, at all, but she didn’t deserve this. No one does.
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Marie Claire magazine editor called out for hypocrisy after accusing others of sexism: El Stephen Miller Follow @redsteeze Madonna with necklace. Madonna without necklace 491 716 6:00 PM 2 May 2016 Lea Goldman Follow Calea This is what men do to women with power. Shame them. About their bodies and their ages. see you. Stephen Miller ar Madonna with necklace. Madonna without necklace 235 212 6:19 PM 2 May 2016 Englewood, NJ Lea Goldman I feel bad for these pants 143 81 12:38 PM 7 Apr 2013 Follow Stephen Miller Follow @redsteeze @lea Things I've never done: Taken pictures of strangers and posted them online to shame them to my Twitter followers. You sick fraud. 8:06 PM 2 May 2016 311 643 Stephen Miller Follow Feminism is powerful magazine editors shaming random people on the street without any power behind their back. twitter.com/lea/status/320 8:04 PM 2 May 2016 h 266 300 Pena Gayto Follow @GayPatriot @lea This is what women do to women without power. Shame them. About their bodies and their ages. see you. 7:56 PM 2 May 2016 h 165 370 Salena Zito @SalenazitoTrib Pot. Kettle twitter.com/lea/status/320 8:00 PM 2 May 2016 Mount Lebanon, PA, United States 18 23 Follow Jimmy Follow @Jimmy Princeton She took a picture of a stranger to humiliate them but is totally mad about a crack at Madonna twitter. 7:54 PM 2 May 2016 T Becket Adams Follow @BecketAdams @lea aredsteeze tbh seems much crueler to take photos of unsuspecting nobodies so that you shame them on Twitter twitter.com/lea/status/320 7:45 PM 2 May 2016 155 356 Lea Goldman Follow Calea @RobProvince here come the band of trolls, right on cue. 6:57 PM 2 May 2016 Englewood, NJ, United States h t 4 10 Stephen Miller @redsteeze You tweeted me first. twitter.com/leastatus727 6:59 PM 2 May 2016 39 84 Follow Stephen Miller Follow l shit you not this is where the executive editor of a magazine who tweeted me out of the blue claims misogyny and online bullying 7:00 PM 2 May 2016 80 148 Marie Claire magazine editor called out for hypocrisy after accusing others of sexism
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