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my-name-is-fireheart: punkartwastaken: dacvntgod: thatspacehorse: spookydaze: When people can accept dragons, giants and fucking ice zombies in a show but black people is too far for their imagination to stretch 😂😂😂 The show has DRAGONS for fucks sake it shouldnt be hard to throw in more POC Also, medieval Europe was diverse by around 1400, as there had already been a few hundred years of the crusades, so lots of contact between Christians and Muslims. Plus Spain (part of EUROPE I might add) was extremely diverse in religion and ethnicity. Check out @medievalpoc on tumblr and Twitter if you want examples. : John Boyega calls out 'Game Of Thrones' for lack of black characters The 'Star Wars' actor has criticised the lack of diversity in the hit HBO show NME.COM 325 102 Comments 14 Shares LikeCommentShare Top comments Write a comment... Paul Seager Considering it's based around the war of the roses which happened in England during he 1400's, I'm guessing that there wasn't many ethnic minorities knocking about then. Don't cry about it, not everything is a hate crime. Like Reply 05 374-17 hrs Edited 20 Replies 47 mins Neil Thompson It is set in a land based on medieval europe. A show should of not have characters of a different ethnic background just for the sake of it. Like Reply 83-17 hrs my-name-is-fireheart: punkartwastaken: dacvntgod: thatspacehorse: spookydaze: When people can accept dragons, giants and fucking ice zombies in a show but black people is too far for their imagination to stretch 😂😂😂 The show has DRAGONS for fucks sake it shouldnt be hard to throw in more POC Also, medieval Europe was diverse by around 1400, as there had already been a few hundred years of the crusades, so lots of contact between Christians and Muslims. Plus Spain (part of EUROPE I might add) was extremely diverse in religion and ethnicity. Check out @medievalpoc on tumblr and Twitter if you want examples.
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And then came the Spanish... SMH: O 4G 14:04 metalwarrior 22 orenjikitty gogomrbrown Follow @linativeboy Native America was filled with large cities and incredible structures yet everyone thinks we were all just primitive ppl running around lost 34 O 4G 14:04 34 Cyn @Xhasca Follow We had pyramids, our own languages, calendars and they still called us savages .@inativeboy Native America was filled with large cities and incredible structures yet everyone thinks we were all just primitive ppl running around I learned in a Latin Studies class (with a chill white dude professor) that when the Europeans first saw Aztedc cities they were stunned by the grid. The Aztecs had city planning and that there was no rational lay out to European cities at the time. No organization. 34 O 4G 14:04 European cities at the time. No organization 99laundry When the Spanish first arrived in Tenochtitlan (novw downtown mexico city) they thought they were dreaming. They had arrived from incredibly unsanitary medieval Europe to a city five times the size of that century's london with a working sewage system artificial "floating gardens" (chinampas), a grid system, and aqueducts providing fresh water. Which wasn't even for drinking! Water from the aqueducts was used for washing and bathing- they preferred using nearby mountain springs for drinking. Hygiene was a huge part if their culture, most people bathed twice a day while the king bathed at least four times a day. Located on an island in the middle of a lake, they used advanced causeways to allow access to the mainland that could be cut off to let canoes through or to defend the city The Spanish saw their buildings and towers and thought they were rising out of the water. The city was one of the most advanced societies at the time. Anyone who thinks that Native Americans were the savages instead of the filthy, disease ridden colonizers who appeared on their land is a damn fool robotsandfrippary 34 O 4G 14:04 mountain springs for drinking. Hygiene was a huge part if their culture, most people bathed twice a day while the king bathed at least four times a day. Located on an island in the middle of a lake, they used advanced causeways to allow access to the mainland that could be cut off to let canoes through or to defend the city The Spanish saw their buildings and towers and thought they were rising out of the water. The city was one of the most advanced societies at the time. Anyone who thinks that Native Americans were the savages instead of the filthy, disease ridden colonizers who appeared on their land is a damn fool robotsandfrippary They've also recently discovered a lost Native Americarn city in Kansas called Etzanoa It rivals the size of Cahokia, which was very Targe as well Tullmetalquest Makes me happy to see people learn about the culture of my country :D 294,346 notas theladyscientist SEGUIR 34 And then came the Spanish... SMH

And then came the Spanish... SMH

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Textile history: The Ionian Chiton. The Dorian Chiton. Costume. Chitons Marjorie & C. H. B.Quennell, Everyday Things in Archaic Greece (London: B. T Batsford, 1931) killerchickadee Wait, wait.. Is that seriously ? How their clothes go? yeah hey whats up bout to put some fucking giant sheets on my body childrentalking lets bring back sheetwares ardatli When you're carding, spinning and weaving everything from scratch, using the big squares exactly as they come off the loom must seem like a fucking brillant idea. 90% (or more) of pre-14th century clothing is made purely on squares (and sometimes triangles cut from squares) annathecrow How did they get the fabric so fine it draped like that? Was that something medieval europe forgot? Or do I just have a completely misguided image of historical clothing? ardati Medieval Europe also had incredibly fine weaves, though the ancient world tended to have them beat. Linen was found in Egypt woven with a fineness that we're still trying to replicate, and there was a kind of cotton woven in India caled woven wind that was supposedly stil translucent at eight layers, and wool shawls so fine that the entire thing could be drawn through a wedding nng The way they could get away with pinking and slashing doublets in the 16th century was partially because the fabrics were so tightly woven that you could simply cut a line on the bias and nothing would fray Modern fabric machining sucks ass in terms of giving us any kind of quality like the kind human beings produced prior to the Industrial Revolution yells about textile history* Reblogging because its fascinating uidu-regani The Celts made very fine clothing as well. They invented plaid after al, and the same weaves that have been found at the La Tene/Halstatt salt mines in Austria were also found as far away as westem China in the tombs of the Tarim mummies Can we talk about 18th century and regency era musin as well because that shit is gorgeous. It's so fine it's more transparent than silk chiffon and oh the tiny hems you can make with n I have an 18th century neckerchief and the hem is about 2mm wide. Not kidding, 2mmll Because it didn't fray lke our stuff does now. All we can produce nowadays is a rough, scratchy, bullshit excuse for muslin and it's horrid bmwiid I love this because we've gotten so blind to what makes 'good fabric now machine lace? horrible scratchy shit mostly made from poly. Actual lace is handmade, lasts for fucking EVER and looks stunning. Regency gowns fucking rocked in terms of fabric quality- we use muslin as a throw away' before sewing the real fabric, back then it WAS a real fabric and it was so finely made you wouldn t even think it was the same stuff Hand hemming is still the best way to finish off anything, but harder than hell because of the shitty weave of modern fabrics. Satin? Silks?I Pah. Yes, fabric is cheaper, more affordable and varied than before, but it is an area where QUALITY was sacrificed for QUANTITY (I don't want to seem like I'm shitting on how great we have it now for clothes and martials or anything, because YAYll but also, I'd love to get my mits on a bolt of real Muslin) archaeologists recently found some Bronze Age fabric woven on site and preserved in marsh in England. it's fine to die for. they were exporting it and trading into Asia. Textile history
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bramblepatch: countlessscreamingargonauts: scarimor: bmwiid: woodsmokeandwords: uidu-regani: tardygrading: spazzbot: ardatli: annathecrow: ardatli: childrentalking: itwashotwestayedinthewater: fabledquill: killerchickadee: intheheatherbright: intheheatherbright: Costume. Chitons. Marjorie C. H. B.Quennell, Everyday Things in Archaic Greece (London: B. T. Batsford, 1931). Wait, wait…. Is that seriously it? How their clothes go? that genuinely is it yeah hey whats up bout to put some fucking giant sheets on my body lets bring back sheetwares When you’re carding, spinning and weaving everything from scratch, using the big squares exactly as they come off the loom must seem like a fucking brilliant idea. 90% (or more) of pre-14th century clothing is made purely on squares (and sometimes triangles cut from squares).  How did they get the fabric so fine it draped like that? Was that something medieval europe forgot? Or do I just have a completely misguided image of historical clothing? Medieval Europe also had incredibly fine weaves, though the ancient world tended to have them beat. Linen was found in Egypt woven with a fineness that we’re still trying to replicate, and there was a kind of cotton woven in India called ‘woven wind’ that was supposedly still translucent at eight layers, and wool shawls so fine that the entire thing could be drawn through a wedding ring.  The way they could get away with pinking and slashing doublets in the 16th century was partially because the fabrics were so tightly woven that you could simply cut a line on the bias and nothing would fray.  Modern fabric machining sucks ass in terms of giving us any kind of quality like the kind human beings produced prior to the Industrial Revolution.  *yells about textile history* Reblogging because it’s fascinating. The Celts made very fine clothing as well. They invented plaid after all, and the same weaves that have been found at the La Tene/Halstatt salt mines in Austria were also found as far away as western China in the tombs of the Tarim mummies. Can we talk about 18th century and regency era muslin as well because that shit is gorgeous. It’s so fine it’s more transparent than silk chiffon and oh the tiny hems you can make with it!! I have an 18th century neckerchief and the hem is about 2mm wide. Not kidding, 2mm!!! Because it didn’t fray like our stuff does now. All we can produce nowadays is a rough, scratchy, bullshit excuse for muslin and it’s horrid. I love this because we’ve gotten so blind to what makes ‘good’ fabric now - machine lace? horrible scratchy shit mostly made from poly. Actual lace is handmade, lasts for fucking EVER and looks stunning.  Regency gowns fucking rocked in terms of fabric quality - we use muslin as a ‘throw away’ before sewing the real fabric, back then it WAS a real fabric and it was so finely made you wouldn’t even think it was the same stuff.  Hand hemming is still the best way to finish off anything, but harder than hell because of the shitty weave of modern fabrics.  Satin? Silks?! Pah. Yes, fabric is cheaper, more affordable and varied than before, but it is an area where QUALITY was sacrificed for QUANTITY.  (I don’t want to seem like I’m shitting on how great we have it now for clothes and martials or anything, because YAY!! but also, I’d love to get my mits on a bolt of real Muslin)  archaeologists recently found some Bronze Age fabric woven on site and preserved in marsh in England. it’s fine to die for. they were exporting it and trading into Asia. I’m not into fashion, but I love reading about the history and evolution of it. My favorite textile history fact is that the ancient Romans loved really sheer, floaty silks, but at the time the fashion in China, where the silk was produced, was for heavy, intricate brocades. So the Romans would import the heavier fabrics, painstakingly unravel them, and use the silk thread to weave the fabric they liked. : The Ionian Chiton The Dorian Chiton. bramblepatch: countlessscreamingargonauts: scarimor: bmwiid: woodsmokeandwords: uidu-regani: tardygrading: spazzbot: ardatli: annathecrow: ardatli: childrentalking: itwashotwestayedinthewater: fabledquill: killerchickadee: intheheatherbright: intheheatherbright: Costume. Chitons. Marjorie C. H. B.Quennell, Everyday Things in Archaic Greece (London: B. T. Batsford, 1931). Wait, wait…. Is that seriously it? How their clothes go? that genuinely is it yeah hey whats up bout to put some fucking giant sheets on my body lets bring back sheetwares When you’re carding, spinning and weaving everything from scratch, using the big squares exactly as they come off the loom must seem like a fucking brilliant idea. 90% (or more) of pre-14th century clothing is made purely on squares (and sometimes triangles cut from squares).  How did they get the fabric so fine it draped like that? Was that something medieval europe forgot? Or do I just have a completely misguided image of historical clothing? Medieval Europe also had incredibly fine weaves, though the ancient world tended to have them beat. Linen was found in Egypt woven with a fineness that we’re still trying to replicate, and there was a kind of cotton woven in India called ‘woven wind’ that was supposedly still translucent at eight layers, and wool shawls so fine that the entire thing could be drawn through a wedding ring.  The way they could get away with pinking and slashing doublets in the 16th century was partially because the fabrics were so tightly woven that you could simply cut a line on the bias and nothing would fray.  Modern fabric machining sucks ass in terms of giving us any kind of quality like the kind human beings produced prior to the Industrial Revolution.  *yells about textile history* Reblogging because it’s fascinating. The Celts made very fine clothing as well. They invented plaid after all, and the same weaves that have been found at the La Tene/Halstatt salt mines in Austria were also found as far away as western China in the tombs of the Tarim mummies. Can we talk about 18th century and regency era muslin as well because that shit is gorgeous. It’s so fine it’s more transparent than silk chiffon and oh the tiny hems you can make with it!! I have an 18th century neckerchief and the hem is about 2mm wide. Not kidding, 2mm!!! Because it didn’t fray like our stuff does now. All we can produce nowadays is a rough, scratchy, bullshit excuse for muslin and it’s horrid. I love this because we’ve gotten so blind to what makes ‘good’ fabric now - machine lace? horrible scratchy shit mostly made from poly. Actual lace is handmade, lasts for fucking EVER and looks stunning.  Regency gowns fucking rocked in terms of fabric quality - we use muslin as a ‘throw away’ before sewing the real fabric, back then it WAS a real fabric and it was so finely made you wouldn’t even think it was the same stuff.  Hand hemming is still the best way to finish off anything, but harder than hell because of the shitty weave of modern fabrics.  Satin? Silks?! Pah. Yes, fabric is cheaper, more affordable and varied than before, but it is an area where QUALITY was sacrificed for QUANTITY.  (I don’t want to seem like I’m shitting on how great we have it now for clothes and martials or anything, because YAY!! but also, I’d love to get my mits on a bolt of real Muslin)  archaeologists recently found some Bronze Age fabric woven on site and preserved in marsh in England. it’s fine to die for. they were exporting it and trading into Asia. I’m not into fashion, but I love reading about the history and evolution of it. My favorite textile history fact is that the ancient Romans loved really sheer, floaty silks, but at the time the fashion in China, where the silk was produced, was for heavy, intricate brocades. So the Romans would import the heavier fabrics, painstakingly unravel them, and use the silk thread to weave the fabric they liked.
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What the fuck ethanadvice-animal.tumblr.com: edwardspoonhands lizziekeiper oo Verizon 100% 9:02 PM Messages Ethan Details K So i calculated it. And it eould only take about 400 people to get enough iron to forge a steel longsword What U know how fantasy books talk about swords "forged with the blood of enemies" Well i calculated it out, and if u drainked about 400 adult men kf their blood, and extracted the iron from it, u would have enough for a longsword. Forged from the blood of your enemies That's pretty neat Ikr Text Message Send macaedh what the fuck ethan kvothbloodless I wish i had a context for this. But I really dont рervocracy I was all ready to "um, actually this, but, um, actually there's about 3-4 grams of iron in a person, which x400 is 1.2-1.6kg, which is a smallish but not unreasonable sword. So. Math checks out. maxiesatanofficial How would you extract the iron, though? The more practical solution would be to kill a mere hundred men, then mix 1 part blood with 3 parts standard molten iron, imo. Cheaper and faster, while still retaining the edge that only evil magic can give you. bemusedlybespectacled Or, you could just make the sword of iron, and then use the blood to temper the blade squeeful 1.2 to 1.6 kilograms is a perfectly reasonable large sword. Your average longsword was 1.1-1.8 kg and I don't even remember if that's including the weight of the hilt, guard, and pommel or just the blade. Your more classic "knight sword" was a mere 1.1 kilograms on average, the blood of 400 men is more than enough. This is using the comparatively crappy metallurgy of medieval Europe and their meh iron swords. Move east to, say, contemporary Iran and make a scimitar using high carbon steel (-2 % ) for a .75 kilogram blade and you only need the blood of about 225 men. optimysticals So putting my thoughts in on this... because how could I not. So you've exsanguinated your 400 guys to get the iron for your sword. Cool. But now you have 400 bodies lying around. Why not put those to good use and cremate them. Use the carbon from those 400 bodies (you won't need alll of them) and now you can make a nice mid-high carbon steel sword. Now you have a sword forged with the blood of your enemies AND strengthened with their bones. hedwig-dordt "high fantasy math- the tag I should have expected to write some day. themarysue I'm so proud of everyone in this post O Photos Source: macaedh 156,793 notes What the fuck ethanadvice-animal.tumblr.com
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What the fuck ethan: edwardspoonhands lizziekeiper oo Verizon 9:02 PM 100% Messages Ethan Details So i calculated it. And it eould only take about 400 people to get enough iron to forge a steel longsword What U know how fantasy books talk about swords "forged with the blood of enemies" Well i calculated it out, and if u drainked about 400 adult men kf their blood, and extracted the iron from it, u would have enough for a longsword. Forged from the blood of your enemies That's pretty neat Ikr ext Message Send macaedh what the fuck ethan kvothbloodless I wish i had a context for this. But I really dont pervocracy I was all ready to "um, actually" this, but, um, actually there's about 3-4 grams of iron in a person, which x400 is 1.2-1.6kg, which is a smallish but not unreasonable sword. So. Math checks out. maxiesatanofficial How would you extract the iron, though? The more practical solution would be to kill a mere hundred men, then mix 1 part blood with 3 parts standard molten iron, imo. Cheaper and faster, while still retaining the edge that only evil magic can give you. bemusedlybespectacled Or, you could just make the sword of iron, and then use the blood to temper the blade squeeful 1.2 to 1.6 kilograms is a perfectly reasonable large sword. Your average longsword was 1.1-1.8 kg and I don't even remember if that's including the weight of the hilt, guard, and pommel or just the blade. Your more classic "knight sword" was a mere 1.1 kilograms on average, the blood of 400 men is more than enough This is using the comparatively crappy metallurgy of medieval Europe and their meh iron swords. Move east to, say, contemporary Iran and make a scimitar using high carbon steel (-296) for a .75 kilogram blade and you only need the blood of about 225 men. optimysticals So putting my thoughts in on this.. because how could I not. So you've exsanguinated your 400 guys to get the iron for your sword. Cool. But now you have 400 bodies lying around Why not put those to good use and cremate them. Use the carbon from those 400 bodies (you won't need all of them) and now you can make a nice mid-high carbon steel sword Now you have a sword forged with the blood of your enemies AND strengthened with their bones hedwig-dordt high fantasy math"-the tag I should have expected to write some day themarysue I'm so proud of everyone in this post Photos Source: macaedh 156,793 notes What the fuck ethan
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On blood and swords.omg-humor.tumblr.com: edwardspoonhands lizziekeiper oo Verizon 9:02 PM 100% Messages Ethan Details So i calculated it. And it eould only take about 400 people to get enough iron to forge a steel longsword What U know how fantasy books talk about swords "forged with the blood of enemies" Well i calculated it out, and if u drainked about 400 adult men kf their blood, and extracted the iron from it, u would have enough for a longsword. Forged from the blood of your enemies That's pretty neat Ikr Text Message Send macaedh what the fuck ethan kvothbloodless I wish i had a context for this. But I really dont. pervocracy I was all ready to "um, actually" this, but, um, actually there's about 3-4 grams of iron in a person, which x400 is 1.2-1.6kg, which is a smallish but not unreasonable sword. So. Math checks out. maxiesatanofficial How would you extract the iron, though? The more practical solution would be to kill a mere hundred men, then mix 1 part blood with 3 parts standard molten iron, imo. Cheaper and faster, while still retaining the edge that only evil magic can give you. bemusedlybespectacled Or, you could just make the sword of iron, and then use the blood to temper the blade squeeful 1.2 to 1.6 kilograms is a perfectly reasonable large sword. Your average longsword was 1.1-1.8 kg and I don't even remember if that's including the weight of the hilt, guard, and pommel or just the blade. Your more classic "knight sword" was a mere 1.1 kilograms on average, the blood of 400 men is more than enough This is using the comparatively crappy metallurgy of medieval Europe and their meh iron swords. Move east to, say, contemporary Iran and make a scimitar using high carbon steel (-296) for a .75 kilogram blade and you only need the blood of about 225 men. optimysticals So putting my thoughts in on this... because how could I not So you've exsanguinated your 400 guys to get the iron for your sword. Cool But now you have 400 bodies lying around Why not put those to good use and cremate them. Use the carbon from those 400 bodies (you won't need all of them) and now you can make a nice mid-high carbon steel sword Now you have a sword forged with the blood of your enemies AND with their bones hedwig-dordt high fantasy math"-the tag I should have expected to write some day themarysue I'm so proud of everyone in this post Photos Source: macaedh 156,793 notes On blood and swords.omg-humor.tumblr.com
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