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ryanthedemiboy: gahdamnpunk: The government does not care about minorities and poor folk. I understand why you’d caption it like that, but this is specifically about indigenous Americans and how the US treats them. The US hates other minorities and poor folk, but please don’t take attention from this. All those other people have a chance at being treated. But people on the reservations… don’t. They were literally given body bags. Here’s the Navajo and Hopi relief fund on gofundme You can also donate through here if you’d like to avoid supporting gofundme. Here is the official Navajo Nation relief fund, posted by their President on twitter (link to tweet). Oh, also, many of them don’t have running water (and never have). Link : ryanthedemiboy: gahdamnpunk: The government does not care about minorities and poor folk. I understand why you’d caption it like that, but this is specifically about indigenous Americans and how the US treats them. The US hates other minorities and poor folk, but please don’t take attention from this. All those other people have a chance at being treated. But people on the reservations… don’t. They were literally given body bags. Here’s the Navajo and Hopi relief fund on gofundme You can also donate through here if you’d like to avoid supporting gofundme. Here is the official Navajo Nation relief fund, posted by their President on twitter (link to tweet). Oh, also, many of them don’t have running water (and never have). Link

ryanthedemiboy: gahdamnpunk: The government does not care about minorities and poor folk. I understand why you’d caption it like that,...

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arachnomatic: aka14kgold: vulturehooligan:    Another photo of the Navajos banning the swastika. The document they are signing starts off: “Because the above ornament, which has been a sign of friendship among our forefathers for many centuries has been desecrated recently by another nation of peoples.” [second paragraph] “Therefore it is resolved that henceforth from this date on and forever more our tribes renounce the use of the emblem commonly known today as the swastika or fylfot on our blankets, baskets, art objects, sandpaintings and clothing.” “But I’m using it in it’s ORIGINAL meaning!” Nope. My respect and my heart goes out to the Navajo nation for the willing amputation of a symbol that belonged to them. I had no idea. : C MANY CES HAS BEEN SECTED RECENT By HEREFCRE T. IS RESOLVEN THAT HENCERORTH FROM THIS DATE ON AND FOREVER MORE OR TRIBES RENOUNCE THE USE OF THE EMBLEM СО"MONLY KNOWN TODAy AS THE SVAT AA OR FYLFOT ON OUR BLANKETS, BASKETS, AT ORJECTS, SANDPAINTINGS AND CLOTHING arachnomatic: aka14kgold: vulturehooligan:    Another photo of the Navajos banning the swastika. The document they are signing starts off: “Because the above ornament, which has been a sign of friendship among our forefathers for many centuries has been desecrated recently by another nation of peoples.” [second paragraph] “Therefore it is resolved that henceforth from this date on and forever more our tribes renounce the use of the emblem commonly known today as the swastika or fylfot on our blankets, baskets, art objects, sandpaintings and clothing.” “But I’m using it in it’s ORIGINAL meaning!” Nope. My respect and my heart goes out to the Navajo nation for the willing amputation of a symbol that belonged to them. I had no idea.

arachnomatic: aka14kgold: vulturehooligan:    Another photo of the Navajos banning the swastika. The document they are signing starts...

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@Regranned from @dayofdistress - Five NativeAmerican tribes are already planning to sue the president. President Trump plans to announce the shrinking of two Utah national monuments next week, in a move that has already angered environmentalists and Native Americans. The national monuments of BearsEars and Grand Staircase-Escalante will see a combined 2 million acres of protected land cut, according to leaked documents obtained by the Associated Press. The reductions would shrink Bears Ears by about 85 percent and Grand Staircase-Escalante by nearly half. The national monuments currently stand at 1.35 million acres and 1.9 million acres respectively. Locals and visitors have long come to the monuments not only for their cultural value among Native Americans but also for their well-conserved hiking and camping grounds. Bears Ears in particular is sacred to many Native American tribes, as it contains thousands of artifacts, including ancient petroglyphs, or rock carvings. Five tribes — the Hopi, Navajo Nation, Ute Mountain Ute Tribe, Pueblo of Zuni, and the Ute Indian Tribe — have already begun making plans to sue jointly following the announcement, the Salt Lake Tribune reported Tuesday. “The tribes view this as an affront to themselves and their own self-determination,” Natalie Landreth, senior staff attorney for the Native American Rights Fund, told the Tribune. Trump is not planning to visit the monuments or to stay overnight in Utah following the announcement, according to the same report. The process to shrink the lands first began back in April when Trump signed an executive order directing Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke to evaluate any national monument larger than 100,000 acres that was established in the past 21 years.: Trump Plans to Cut 2 Million Acres of National Monument Lands: Report @Regranned from @dayofdistress - Five NativeAmerican tribes are already planning to sue the president. President Trump plans to announce the shrinking of two Utah national monuments next week, in a move that has already angered environmentalists and Native Americans. The national monuments of BearsEars and Grand Staircase-Escalante will see a combined 2 million acres of protected land cut, according to leaked documents obtained by the Associated Press. The reductions would shrink Bears Ears by about 85 percent and Grand Staircase-Escalante by nearly half. The national monuments currently stand at 1.35 million acres and 1.9 million acres respectively. Locals and visitors have long come to the monuments not only for their cultural value among Native Americans but also for their well-conserved hiking and camping grounds. Bears Ears in particular is sacred to many Native American tribes, as it contains thousands of artifacts, including ancient petroglyphs, or rock carvings. Five tribes — the Hopi, Navajo Nation, Ute Mountain Ute Tribe, Pueblo of Zuni, and the Ute Indian Tribe — have already begun making plans to sue jointly following the announcement, the Salt Lake Tribune reported Tuesday. “The tribes view this as an affront to themselves and their own self-determination,” Natalie Landreth, senior staff attorney for the Native American Rights Fund, told the Tribune. Trump is not planning to visit the monuments or to stay overnight in Utah following the announcement, according to the same report. The process to shrink the lands first began back in April when Trump signed an executive order directing Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke to evaluate any national monument larger than 100,000 acres that was established in the past 21 years.

@Regranned from @dayofdistress - Five NativeAmerican tribes are already planning to sue the president. President Trump plans to announce...

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I can't believe people like this exist. He's angry that I'm asian dating non-asians, even after I tell him I'm not Asian.: N Ol O 1111 8%) 5:38 PM You fucked up dating a white guy .1d You romanticize his blue eyes and blonde hair and even justify his abuse by seeing him as a scared boy when really he is a monster. Now you adorn yourself with your Asianness for what? So you can lure another yellow fever white man who will use and abuse you? 1d Lol wat 19h I'm sad you feel that way? 9h ou should feel sorry for yourself. You keep jumping in a relationship with an abusive white man but you dont care because youre used to the cycle of abuse. Youre the reason why yellow fever exists. 18h Ooh! Tell me more! Also, can l ask what makes you believe I'm "adorning myself with asianness?" Is it because I'm wearing my jacket in the photo, with my martial arts class patch on it? RI 0 0 11 8% 5:39 PM 6h Its obvious what youre into. Youre just like every other white washed asian girl in the western hemisphere that wants the tall, blonde, white boyfriend. Youre willing to put up with autistic fuckwits who you know are bad for you but keep dating anyways because you have some false fairy land story in your head you desperately want to live Was your ex's previous girlfriend also Asian? Was the women he cheated on Asian or white? You dont think its weird that he immediately starts flirting with you after he leaves a relationship? Or that he has assburgers like every other nerdy weak white boy? You know what. I dont even care. Go live your life. If you so desperately want that white picket fence with a typical white boy to live out the western dream then go ahead. Go keep attracting white men who use your own culture of martial arts to hurt you. Well, I'm not exactly sure what happened in your life to make you this jaded, but I hope you come to terms with it eventually, instead of taking it out on random strangers Also, next time you decide to show your ignorant racism to random people, you should make sure that your target is the ethnicity you're being racist over. I'm a race so minor that it even flew under your radar. Good luck! Praying for you here in the Navajo Nation Oh so youre indian pretending to be asian to take advantage of yellow fever. Nice Good luck with your life. RI 0 0 11 8% 5:39 PM Oh so youre indian pretending to be asian to take advantage of yellow fever. Nice Good luck with your life. Sure, that's exactly what's happening Can I ask why you think I'm pretending to be Asian? Or why I want "vellow-fever"? I actually avoided a lot of things associated with Asian cultures when I was growing up because of bullying from white and black kids. I'm pretty sure I was one of a few native American students in that city at the time. No one would even ask, they all just assumedI was Asian. I've been called every racial slur you could think of, even after l insisted I was navajo. I never took offense to being called asian either, it was the fact that my own culture was pushed to the brink of genocide, to the point that people don't see my own culture when they see me, they see someone else. They see what thev want as a result of their own world views When I got older though, I decided that people are going to think what they want. It took a lot to grow past it. I wanted to learn martial arts since l was 10, but didn't start until I was 20. I wa:s afraid for so long that people would be stupid and assume I was trying to be something I'm not. But I just do my own thing now Ignorance finds a way to butt in no matter what. I know I won't change your racist perceptions of people and life in general, but I really do hope things get better for you. I can only imagine the life experiences people go through that leads to views like this Can I ask why you think I'm pretending to be Asian? Or why I want "vellow-fever"? I actually avoided a lot of things associated with Asian cultures when I was growing up because of bullying from white and black kids. I'm pretty sure I was one of a few native American students in that city at the time. No one would even ask, they all just assumedI was Asian. I've been called every racial slur you could think of, even after l insisted I was navajo. I never took offense to being called asian either, it was the fact that my own culture was pushed to the brink of genocide, to the point that people don't see my own culture when they see me, they see someone else. They see what thev want as a result of their own world views When I got older though, I decided that people are going to think what they want. It took a lot to grow past it. I wanted to learn martial arts since l was 10, but didn't start until I was 20. I wa:s afraid for so long that people would be stupid and assume I was trying to be something I'm not. But I just do my own thing now Ignorance finds a way to butt in no matter what. I know I won't change your racist perceptions of people and life in general, but I really do hope things get better for you. I can only imagine the life experiences people go through that leads to views like this Oh! And l'm half white. That's why I'm light-skinned compared to other native Americans. Makes it hard to fit in any group altogether. White people see me as asian, natives see me as asian, even Asians see me as Asian (like you did at first) I've never ever claimed to be Asian though. I don't really see why anyone would want to be something they aren't. It concerns me that you think I'm trying to reap "advantages" of it. In my opinion, there are no "advantages" at all when it comes to people fetishizing a race. There is a huge problem with native American trafficking and fetishizing native women. Its frustrating Reply I can't believe people like this exist. He's angry that I'm asian dating non-asians, even after I tell him I'm not Asian.
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The U.S. EnvironmentalProtectionAgency has refused to pay more than $1.2 billion in claims filed against it in response to the GoldKingMine spill, reported the Farmington Daily Times. The EPA says the Federal Tort Claims Act prevents the agency from paying claims the result from “discretionary” government actions. Congress passed the law to allow government agencies — and in this case, contractors working on their behalf — to act “without the fear of paying damages in the event something went wrong while taking the action,” according to a press release from the EPA. An EPA agency official said paying the claims would discourage such cleanup efforts in the future. The EPA says the work conducted at the Gold King Mine near Silverton, Colo., is considered a “discretionary function” under the law. Contractors on Aug. 5, 2015, breached the mine, which released more than three million gallons of toxic wastewater into a tributary that feeds the AnimasRiver, which ultimately flows into the SanJuanRiver and Lake Powell. Federal lawmakers representing NewMexico decried the announcement, calling it a “shameful legal interpretation of liability.” New Mexico Attorney General Hector Balderas, a Democrat, accused the EPA of revictimizing the state and the Navajo Nation by not taking full responsibility for triggering the spill of 3 million gallons of toxic wastewater, reported NBC 12 News. Sens. Tom Udall and Martin Heinrich, New Mexico Democrats, and Rep. Ben Ray Luján (D-N.M.) issued a joint statement saying they would continue pushing for legislation to hold the EPA accountable. They also said it would be up to the courts to determine whether the EPA’s defense is legitimate. “We are outraged at this last-ditch move by the federal government’s lawyers to go back on the EPA’s promise to the people of the state of New Mexico — and especially the NavajoNation — that it would fully address this environmental disaster that still plagues the people of the FourCorners region,” the statement reads. ✋🏾More in comments👇🏾 MniWiconi WaterIsLife: EPA Refuses To Pay Claims After Mine Spill Dumps 3,000,000 Gallons of Toxic Waste Into Water on Native American Land MARCH 13, 2017 AT8:51 AM Counter Current News Jeremiah Jones The U.S. EnvironmentalProtectionAgency has refused to pay more than $1.2 billion in claims filed against it in response to the GoldKingMine spill, reported the Farmington Daily Times. The EPA says the Federal Tort Claims Act prevents the agency from paying claims the result from “discretionary” government actions. Congress passed the law to allow government agencies — and in this case, contractors working on their behalf — to act “without the fear of paying damages in the event something went wrong while taking the action,” according to a press release from the EPA. An EPA agency official said paying the claims would discourage such cleanup efforts in the future. The EPA says the work conducted at the Gold King Mine near Silverton, Colo., is considered a “discretionary function” under the law. Contractors on Aug. 5, 2015, breached the mine, which released more than three million gallons of toxic wastewater into a tributary that feeds the AnimasRiver, which ultimately flows into the SanJuanRiver and Lake Powell. Federal lawmakers representing NewMexico decried the announcement, calling it a “shameful legal interpretation of liability.” New Mexico Attorney General Hector Balderas, a Democrat, accused the EPA of revictimizing the state and the Navajo Nation by not taking full responsibility for triggering the spill of 3 million gallons of toxic wastewater, reported NBC 12 News. Sens. Tom Udall and Martin Heinrich, New Mexico Democrats, and Rep. Ben Ray Luján (D-N.M.) issued a joint statement saying they would continue pushing for legislation to hold the EPA accountable. They also said it would be up to the courts to determine whether the EPA’s defense is legitimate. “We are outraged at this last-ditch move by the federal government’s lawyers to go back on the EPA’s promise to the people of the state of New Mexico — and especially the NavajoNation — that it would fully address this environmental disaster that still plagues the people of the FourCorners region,” the statement reads. ✋🏾More in comments👇🏾 MniWiconi WaterIsLife

The U.S. EnvironmentalProtectionAgency has refused to pay more than $1.2 billion in claims filed against it in response to the GoldKingMi...

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Repost @california_libertarian with @repostapp ・・・ Three years ago, the EPA struck a dealwith the owners of the largest coal plant in the Western U.S. to close the plant by 2044. Now—because of economics, not regulation—the owners plan to shut the plant down by 2019 instead. The Navajo Generating Station, 12 miles from the Grand Canyon near Page, Arizona, is the seventh largestindividual source of climate pollution in the country, pumping out more than 14 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions a year. It's also a major source of air pollution for people living nearby; by some estimates, shutting it down will also save more than $127 million a year in health costs Both the plant and the nearby coal mine also use a significant amount of water that would otherwise be used as drinking water for the Navajo Nation. "It's clean water that they're using," says Percy Deal from Dine Care, a local Navajo environmental group. "I really believe that it's time to put an end to that. That 31,000 acre-feet of water is Navajo water, and for almost 50 years now, Navajos have not been able to use it." While Navajos have experienced the negative effects of the plant and mine, the power has been sent elsewhere; 18,000 homes on the reservation still don't have electricity. Like other coal plants, the Navajo Generating Station has been struggling to compete with cheap natural gas. The plant's customers have been paying more than they would otherwise. The Central Arizona Project, one of the main purchasers of power, reported in a recent presentation that they could have saved $38.5 million in 2016 by purchasing power at standard market rates instead of the coal plant. Coal plants also face competition from renewables, at a time when demand for new electricity in the U.S. is growing slowly. "As new gas-fired and renewable resources are being added every month, this means that more supply-side resources are competing for the same or almost the same demand," David Schissel, director of resource planning analysis at the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis, tells Co.Exist. "This is not good for coal.": X https:// www.fastcoexist.com The Largest Coal Plant In The Western U.S. Is Closing Decades Ahead of Schedule The Navajo Generating Station is the seventh largest source of climate pollution in the country. When it closes in 2019, it will be because of economics-not regulation california libertarian Repost @california_libertarian with @repostapp ・・・ Three years ago, the EPA struck a dealwith the owners of the largest coal plant in the Western U.S. to close the plant by 2044. Now—because of economics, not regulation—the owners plan to shut the plant down by 2019 instead. The Navajo Generating Station, 12 miles from the Grand Canyon near Page, Arizona, is the seventh largestindividual source of climate pollution in the country, pumping out more than 14 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions a year. It's also a major source of air pollution for people living nearby; by some estimates, shutting it down will also save more than $127 million a year in health costs Both the plant and the nearby coal mine also use a significant amount of water that would otherwise be used as drinking water for the Navajo Nation. "It's clean water that they're using," says Percy Deal from Dine Care, a local Navajo environmental group. "I really believe that it's time to put an end to that. That 31,000 acre-feet of water is Navajo water, and for almost 50 years now, Navajos have not been able to use it." While Navajos have experienced the negative effects of the plant and mine, the power has been sent elsewhere; 18,000 homes on the reservation still don't have electricity. Like other coal plants, the Navajo Generating Station has been struggling to compete with cheap natural gas. The plant's customers have been paying more than they would otherwise. The Central Arizona Project, one of the main purchasers of power, reported in a recent presentation that they could have saved $38.5 million in 2016 by purchasing power at standard market rates instead of the coal plant. Coal plants also face competition from renewables, at a time when demand for new electricity in the U.S. is growing slowly. "As new gas-fired and renewable resources are being added every month, this means that more supply-side resources are competing for the same or almost the same demand," David Schissel, director of resource planning analysis at the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis, tells Co.Exist. "This is not good for coal."

Repost @california_libertarian with @repostapp ・・・ Three years ago, the EPA struck a dealwith the owners of the largest coal plant in the...

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Three years ago, the EPA struck a dealwith the owners of the largest coal plant in the Western U.S. to close the plant by 2044. Now—because of economics, not regulation—the owners plan to shut the plant down by 2019 instead. The Navajo Generating Station, 12 miles from the Grand Canyon near Page, Arizona, is the seventh largestindividual source of climate pollution in the country, pumping out more than 14 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions a year. It's also a major source of air pollution for people living nearby; by some estimates, shutting it down will also save more than $127 million a year in health costs Both the plant and the nearby coal mine also use a significant amount of water that would otherwise be used as drinking water for the Navajo Nation. "It's clean water that they're using," says Percy Deal from Dine Care, a local Navajo environmental group. "I really believe that it's time to put an end to that. That 31,000 acre-feet of water is Navajo water, and for almost 50 years now, Navajos have not been able to use it." While Navajos have experienced the negative effects of the plant and mine, the power has been sent elsewhere; 18,000 homes on the reservation still don't have electricity. Like other coal plants, the Navajo Generating Station has been struggling to compete with cheap natural gas. The plant's customers have been paying more than they would otherwise. The Central Arizona Project, one of the main purchasers of power, reported in a recent presentation that they could have saved $38.5 million in 2016 by purchasing power at standard market rates instead of the coal plant. Coal plants also face competition from renewables, at a time when demand for new electricity in the U.S. is growing slowly. "As new gas-fired and renewable resources are being added every month, this means that more supply-side resources are competing for the same or almost the same demand," David Schissel, director of resource planning analysis at the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis, tells Co.Exist. "This is not good for coal.": X https:// www.fastcoexist.com The Largest Coal Plant In The Western U.S. Is Closing Decades Ahead of Schedule The Navajo Generating Station is the seventh largest source of Climate pollution in the country. When it closes in 2019, it will be because of economics not regulation Three years ago, the EPA struck a dealwith the owners of the largest coal plant in the Western U.S. to close the plant by 2044. Now—because of economics, not regulation—the owners plan to shut the plant down by 2019 instead. The Navajo Generating Station, 12 miles from the Grand Canyon near Page, Arizona, is the seventh largestindividual source of climate pollution in the country, pumping out more than 14 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions a year. It's also a major source of air pollution for people living nearby; by some estimates, shutting it down will also save more than $127 million a year in health costs Both the plant and the nearby coal mine also use a significant amount of water that would otherwise be used as drinking water for the Navajo Nation. "It's clean water that they're using," says Percy Deal from Dine Care, a local Navajo environmental group. "I really believe that it's time to put an end to that. That 31,000 acre-feet of water is Navajo water, and for almost 50 years now, Navajos have not been able to use it." While Navajos have experienced the negative effects of the plant and mine, the power has been sent elsewhere; 18,000 homes on the reservation still don't have electricity. Like other coal plants, the Navajo Generating Station has been struggling to compete with cheap natural gas. The plant's customers have been paying more than they would otherwise. The Central Arizona Project, one of the main purchasers of power, reported in a recent presentation that they could have saved $38.5 million in 2016 by purchasing power at standard market rates instead of the coal plant. Coal plants also face competition from renewables, at a time when demand for new electricity in the U.S. is growing slowly. "As new gas-fired and renewable resources are being added every month, this means that more supply-side resources are competing for the same or almost the same demand," David Schissel, director of resource planning analysis at the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis, tells Co.Exist. "This is not good for coal."

Three years ago, the EPA struck a dealwith the owners of the largest coal plant in the Western U.S. to close the plant by 2044. Now—becau...

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