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oo-magicalcake-oo: paper-mario-wiki: siege1: gahdamnpunk: Look how talented he is!! His instagram is waspa_art I love that he’s that good at 11. I can’t even imagine how his style will look in the future with even more years of practice on him i always think its so wacky that picasso was drawing near lifelike portraits at age 15 and think “wow, thats so crazy. thats a once in a century kind of talent huh” and i never really thought i’d see that kind of kid in my lifetime. but this kid is past where picasso was and hes 4 years ahead of the curve no less. im really interested to see where this kid goes. this is genuinely incredible. i was thinking about saying “this is so cool” or “this kid is a genius” or something but i feel like thatd be doing him a disservice. this kid is history in the making. My jaw dropped : CGTN Africa o LIVE f CGTN Africa NIGERIA ART SCENE 11-year-old artist becomes a sensation in Lagos @cgtnafrica g CGTN Africa COTN Africa oo-magicalcake-oo: paper-mario-wiki: siege1: gahdamnpunk: Look how talented he is!! His instagram is waspa_art I love that he’s that good at 11. I can’t even imagine how his style will look in the future with even more years of practice on him i always think its so wacky that picasso was drawing near lifelike portraits at age 15 and think “wow, thats so crazy. thats a once in a century kind of talent huh” and i never really thought i’d see that kind of kid in my lifetime. but this kid is past where picasso was and hes 4 years ahead of the curve no less. im really interested to see where this kid goes. this is genuinely incredible. i was thinking about saying “this is so cool” or “this kid is a genius” or something but i feel like thatd be doing him a disservice. this kid is history in the making. My jaw dropped
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fuck-sayer: thatlupa: jenniferrpovey: jumpingjacktrash: becausegoodheroesdeservekidneys: ultrafacts: Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts YOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO Senegal, Mauritania, Mali, Burkina Faso, Niger, Nigeria, Chad, Sudan, Eritrea, Ethiopia, and Djibouti. Those are the countries. It will be drought-resistant species, mostly acacias. And this is a brilliant idea you have no idea oh my Christ This will create so many jobs and regenerate so many communities and aaaaaahhhhhhh more info here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Green_Wall it’s already happening, and already having positive effects. this is wonderful, why have i not heard of this before? i’m so happy! Oh yes, acacia trees. They fix nitrogen and improve soil quality. And, to make things fun, the species they’re using practices “reverse leaf phenology.” The trees go dormant in the rainy season and then grow their leaves again in the dry season. This means you can plant crops under the trees, in that nitrogen-rich soil, and the trees don’t compete for light because they don’t have any leaves on. And then in the dry season, you harvest the leaves and feed them to your cows. Crops grown under acacia trees have better yield than those grown without them. Considerably better. So, this isn’t just about stopping the advancement of the Sahara - it’s also about improving food security for the entire sub-Saharan belt and possibly reclaiming some of the desert as productive land. Of course, before the “green revolution,” the farmers knew to plant acacia trees - it’s a traditional practice that they were convinced to abandon in favor of “more reliable” artificial fertilizers (that caused soil degradation, soil erosion, etc). This is why you listen to the people who, you know, have lived with and on land for centuries. ^ The bold. : 12 African nations have come together pledging to build a 9 mile wide band of trees that will stretch all the way across Africa, 4750 miles, in order to stop the progressive advancement of the Sahara. Ultrafacts.tumblr.com fuck-sayer: thatlupa: jenniferrpovey: jumpingjacktrash: becausegoodheroesdeservekidneys: ultrafacts: Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts YOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO Senegal, Mauritania, Mali, Burkina Faso, Niger, Nigeria, Chad, Sudan, Eritrea, Ethiopia, and Djibouti. Those are the countries. It will be drought-resistant species, mostly acacias. And this is a brilliant idea you have no idea oh my Christ This will create so many jobs and regenerate so many communities and aaaaaahhhhhhh more info here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Green_Wall it’s already happening, and already having positive effects. this is wonderful, why have i not heard of this before? i’m so happy! Oh yes, acacia trees. They fix nitrogen and improve soil quality. And, to make things fun, the species they’re using practices “reverse leaf phenology.” The trees go dormant in the rainy season and then grow their leaves again in the dry season. This means you can plant crops under the trees, in that nitrogen-rich soil, and the trees don’t compete for light because they don’t have any leaves on. And then in the dry season, you harvest the leaves and feed them to your cows. Crops grown under acacia trees have better yield than those grown without them. Considerably better. So, this isn’t just about stopping the advancement of the Sahara - it’s also about improving food security for the entire sub-Saharan belt and possibly reclaiming some of the desert as productive land. Of course, before the “green revolution,” the farmers knew to plant acacia trees - it’s a traditional practice that they were convinced to abandon in favor of “more reliable” artificial fertilizers (that caused soil degradation, soil erosion, etc). This is why you listen to the people who, you know, have lived with and on land for centuries. ^ The bold.
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lubricates: kemetic-dreams: Nigerians Are Building Fireproof, Bulletproof, And Eco-Friendly Homes With Plastic Bottles And Mud By Editorial_Staff -Nov 23, 2015 AFRICANGLOBE  – These colorful homes are bulletproof, fireproof, and can withstand earthquakes. They also maintain a comfortable temperature, produce zero carbon emissions, and are powered by solar and methane gas from recycled waste.Plastic is everywhere. In fact, the environment is so riddled with it, researchers predict that 99% of all birds on this planet will have plastic in their gut by the year 2050. It is not enough to persuade people to use less, plastic needs to be repurposed and reused to be kept out of landfills. Despite informative infographics, emotional statistics, and recycling programs, many nations – especially the United States – continue to toss plastics into landfills without much care. This unfortunate reality has spurred many to get creative with the discarded byproducts of society. Some have used plastic waste to construct marvelous sculptures and raise awareness about the issue, while others are re-purposing it entirely to construct eco-friendly homes. As phys.org reports, the housing crisis has become so bad in Nigeria, nearly 16 million units are required to address the shortage. Because crafting traditional homes would be far too expensive for most, locals adopted the idea put forth by two NGOs and are now building plastic bottle homes. The solution not only cuts costs for building a house, it is beneficial for the environment. Founded by Kaduna-based NGO Development Association for Renewable Energies (DARE), with help from London-based NGO Africa Community Trust, the project is solving two problems at once by addressing the homelessness issue and helping the environment. Not only will there be less plastic in landfills, the house is designed to produce zero carbon emissions. In addition, it is completely powered by solar panels and methane gas from recycled human and animal waste. To create a two-bedroom bottle house, workers fill plastic bottles with sand and then hold them together using mud and cement. This forms a solid wall that is stronger than cinder blocks. That’s not all: These colorful homes are bulletproof, fireproof and can withstand earthquakes. They can also hold a comfortable temperature year round. The buildings can be built to three stories, but no higher, due to the weight of the sand-filled bottles. And, of course, the magnificent diversity of recycled bottles give each house a unique and bright look. A two-bedroom house requires 14,000 bottles to complete. To put this into perspective, Nigeria throws away three million bottles every day. Clearly, there are plenty of bottles which can be repurposed to build every individual in their own abode. At least Nigeria isn’t as wasteful as the United States, which discards 130 million bottles per day. That’s 47 billion bottles every year – nearly 80% of which end up in the landfill. If the United States were to save these bottles and re purpose them into houses like folks in Nigeria are doing, 9,257 houses could be built per day. That is nearly 3.4 million houses a year, reports Off Grid World. With 3.5 million people living on the streets in the U.S., is this the solution needed to remedy the homelessness crisis? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hu0z6zyc2J8 pls spread this is important: lubricates: kemetic-dreams: Nigerians Are Building Fireproof, Bulletproof, And Eco-Friendly Homes With Plastic Bottles And Mud By Editorial_Staff -Nov 23, 2015 AFRICANGLOBE  – These colorful homes are bulletproof, fireproof, and can withstand earthquakes. They also maintain a comfortable temperature, produce zero carbon emissions, and are powered by solar and methane gas from recycled waste.Plastic is everywhere. In fact, the environment is so riddled with it, researchers predict that 99% of all birds on this planet will have plastic in their gut by the year 2050. It is not enough to persuade people to use less, plastic needs to be repurposed and reused to be kept out of landfills. Despite informative infographics, emotional statistics, and recycling programs, many nations – especially the United States – continue to toss plastics into landfills without much care. This unfortunate reality has spurred many to get creative with the discarded byproducts of society. Some have used plastic waste to construct marvelous sculptures and raise awareness about the issue, while others are re-purposing it entirely to construct eco-friendly homes. As phys.org reports, the housing crisis has become so bad in Nigeria, nearly 16 million units are required to address the shortage. Because crafting traditional homes would be far too expensive for most, locals adopted the idea put forth by two NGOs and are now building plastic bottle homes. The solution not only cuts costs for building a house, it is beneficial for the environment. Founded by Kaduna-based NGO Development Association for Renewable Energies (DARE), with help from London-based NGO Africa Community Trust, the project is solving two problems at once by addressing the homelessness issue and helping the environment. Not only will there be less plastic in landfills, the house is designed to produce zero carbon emissions. In addition, it is completely powered by solar panels and methane gas from recycled human and animal waste. To create a two-bedroom bottle house, workers fill plastic bottles with sand and then hold them together using mud and cement. This forms a solid wall that is stronger than cinder blocks. That’s not all: These colorful homes are bulletproof, fireproof and can withstand earthquakes. They can also hold a comfortable temperature year round. The buildings can be built to three stories, but no higher, due to the weight of the sand-filled bottles. And, of course, the magnificent diversity of recycled bottles give each house a unique and bright look. A two-bedroom house requires 14,000 bottles to complete. To put this into perspective, Nigeria throws away three million bottles every day. Clearly, there are plenty of bottles which can be repurposed to build every individual in their own abode. At least Nigeria isn’t as wasteful as the United States, which discards 130 million bottles per day. That’s 47 billion bottles every year – nearly 80% of which end up in the landfill. If the United States were to save these bottles and re purpose them into houses like folks in Nigeria are doing, 9,257 houses could be built per day. That is nearly 3.4 million houses a year, reports Off Grid World. With 3.5 million people living on the streets in the U.S., is this the solution needed to remedy the homelessness crisis? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hu0z6zyc2J8 pls spread this is important

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Teaboots Adventures As That White Girl in Horror Movies: teaboot The amount of times I could have been that white girl in the horror movie could honestly be a movie in itself and it's honestly a waste that my entire life isn't constantly recorded on film because it would be HILARIOUS teaboot 1. That one time I decided to see what was past the old gate in the woods, but when got there it had been smashed in half and there was a decapitated sheep head with no skin just off the trail, so instead I just turned around and went home. 2. That time some friends and I went camping and we found a pile of bones wrapped in a garbage bag buried under a log, but the adult supervisor told us it was nothing, so we just put it back and didn't talk about it again. 3. The time I was getting chased through the woods at night and I realized "wait it's dark as fuck so I just held still until the guy gave up and left. . The time this dude said he was in love with me and so he was going to cut my head off and dump my body in a lake, so l told him to grow the hell up, but then he got caught stealing girl's underwear a day later andI never saw him again 5. That one time in college where I was taking a shortcut on my home at night and a car followed me into a dark alley, so I stared directly into the driver's side of the window and walked towards it to psych them out 6. The night I was out on a walk and this old guy told me he'd locked his keys in his truck and that he needed someone my size to crawl in through the back window for him, so I told him you know that sounds super suspicious right and told him where to find a pay phone for a tow truck instead 7. The one time this random guy on the street said he was in love with me and so he was going to follow me home on my bus, so l clapped him on the shoulder and told him that if he got that close to my bus then I was going to throw him under the wheels, but then this really nice homeless man from Nigeria told the guy to fuck off and then checked to make sure he didn't follow me onboard 8. That big cat with yellow eyes who I found in a well and brought home who used to put rotting meat in my closet and wake me up by chewing on my face, until I put him back outside and never saw him again. 9. My one cousin who used to come over for the summer who kept calling me 'piñata and hitting me with sticks, until he went back home and was sent to juvie c got caught torturing animals cause he finally 10. The time I got lost on the way to a meeting and wound up at a circus tent instead, and got followed by a full-out clown for three vacant street blocks 11. The pet hamster I had when I was seven who would scream all night and eventually es- caped by ripping a bar out of its cage and wig- gling through the hole. My mom caught it and put it back but it lved another year and a half until one night the screaming just stopped 12. The time I was whistling in the woods and something started whistling back, so I went home 13. That one night at summer camp where a group of girls got together to play 'bloody mary in the lavatory and invited me to come with them so I said "no thanks" and stayed with the camp councillors and drank soup instead. 14. The old abandoned house I just moved into with the door that leads into a big empty room full of dirt and empty cooking pots that I just sort of... locked up forever and never gon ear 15. Once when I was at an ihop I saw a coffee mug do a full 360° spin with nobody touching it, so I said 'that was neat' and never ate there again 16. The time I took a photo of a big old raven sitting on the crucifix on top of the old town church cause it was the most goth thing l'd ever seen, right? But then it swooped down towards me, so I apologized immediately for being rude, and I felt a little silly for a while but the car that hit me on the way home didn't even leave a bruise so idk be nice to birds teaboot Sorry I know I bring this shit up a lot but sometimes im awake at night and I just. keep thinking teaboot I think the secret to survival is to be good to animals, stay away from men, and say "no elsean Source: teaboot 205.063 notes Teaboots Adventures As That White Girl in Horror Movies
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westafricanbaby: fredexmain: im-a-hydra: nubianbrothaz: blackfashion: rudegyalchina: glammednaturally: Now this is something to talk about Weldone boys 👏🏾👏🏾👏🏾👏🏾☺️☺️☺️👍🏾👍🏾👍🏾#news #worldnews #nigeria #africa #google Compete? Their web browser is faster tf . What’s the name of the browser? Two teen brothers build mobile web browser on May 28, 2015  /   in Education, News 9:15 am   /   Comments By Dayo Adesulu The duo of Osine Ikhianosime and Anesi Ikhianosime have rekindled hope in the future of nigeria as they entered their names in the catalogue of application developers when they built a mobile web browser that is already in use globally. Osine Ikhianosime 13, and Anesi Ikhianosime 15 who co-developed ‘Crocodile Browser Lite’ were born of same parents and both are Year nine and 11 students of Greensprings School, Anthony Campus, Lagos. While both brothers write code, Anesi designs the user interface. Osine Ikhianosine and Anesi Ikhianosime Osine and Anesi launched the mobile browser on the Mobango app store before moving to Google Play Store to try and reach a wider audience. As you read this piece, the browser currently has around 100 to 500 downloads and they do not have ads in the app yet. They both began developing an Android web browser, which they named Crocodile Browser Lite, about a year ago out of boredom. Due to their strong interest  in technology, they decided to create a functional, fast browser for feature and low end phones because, according to them, “We were fed up with Google Chrome.” Osine who told TechCabal in his pitch mail said: ‘’I write the code, my brother designs it.” Born April 28, 2001, his interest in computers began at age seven. It was also at this age that he and his brother, Anesi Ikhianosime, who was 9 at the time, came up with the idea of starting a company. Recalling how it started, Osine said, they first named it ‘Doors’ with Microsoft’s Windows, but when they discovered that the name was already in use, they had to change the name to BluDoors. Relating his experience, Osine said: ‘’When we decided to learn to code at age 12 and 14 respectively, I didn’t let my uncle’s belief that it would be a tough feat to achieve deter me.” On his part, Anesi said: “I learnt to code by myself. I started in 2013, I used sites like Code Academy, Code Avengers and books like ‘Android for Game Development’ and ‘Games for Dummies’,” said Anesi. Meanwhile their mother, Mrs Ngozi Ikhianosime, who is a Mathematics teacher said: “Osine could already use a PC before he could read at age three. It is all he does since he learnt to code.” The mother who ascribed the success to Greensprings Schools, said students of the school have access to computer and internet facilities, just as personal laptops are made available to each of them at home. “After Anesi is through with his secondary school education, he will attend A levels, after which he will go to MIT in Boston for his first degree, because the university has the facilities he needs to learn.” She said. Their father Mr Philip Ikhianosime, who is the Head of Management Services and Human Resource Manager at an Insurance Company says the boys developed interest in PC usage very early. He agrees as well, that his children’s school is very instrumental in their continued interest in programming. Anesi says that he’d like to develop another app that solves real social problems, such as traffic and communication. The brothers are releasing a new version of Crocodile Browser Lite 3.0 this April. - See more at: http://www.vanguardngr.com/2015/05/two-teen-brothers-build-mobile-web-browser/#sthash.ZF2vj1zZ.dpuf NubianBrothaz Boost the eff outta this Salute to those young brothas. Young, black geniuses 🇳🇬🇳🇬🇳🇬🇳🇬🇳🇬🇳🇬: Teen Nigerian Brothers Build Web Browser To Chromee JUNE 6, 2015 LEAVE A COMMENT Compete With Google Meet Anesi and Osine Ikhianosime. They westafricanbaby: fredexmain: im-a-hydra: nubianbrothaz: blackfashion: rudegyalchina: glammednaturally: Now this is something to talk about Weldone boys 👏🏾👏🏾👏🏾👏🏾☺️☺️☺️👍🏾👍🏾👍🏾#news #worldnews #nigeria #africa #google Compete? Their web browser is faster tf . What’s the name of the browser? Two teen brothers build mobile web browser on May 28, 2015  /   in Education, News 9:15 am   /   Comments By Dayo Adesulu The duo of Osine Ikhianosime and Anesi Ikhianosime have rekindled hope in the future of nigeria as they entered their names in the catalogue of application developers when they built a mobile web browser that is already in use globally. Osine Ikhianosime 13, and Anesi Ikhianosime 15 who co-developed ‘Crocodile Browser Lite’ were born of same parents and both are Year nine and 11 students of Greensprings School, Anthony Campus, Lagos. While both brothers write code, Anesi designs the user interface. Osine Ikhianosine and Anesi Ikhianosime Osine and Anesi launched the mobile browser on the Mobango app store before moving to Google Play Store to try and reach a wider audience. As you read this piece, the browser currently has around 100 to 500 downloads and they do not have ads in the app yet. They both began developing an Android web browser, which they named Crocodile Browser Lite, about a year ago out of boredom. Due to their strong interest  in technology, they decided to create a functional, fast browser for feature and low end phones because, according to them, “We were fed up with Google Chrome.” Osine who told TechCabal in his pitch mail said: ‘’I write the code, my brother designs it.” Born April 28, 2001, his interest in computers began at age seven. It was also at this age that he and his brother, Anesi Ikhianosime, who was 9 at the time, came up with the idea of starting a company. Recalling how it started, Osine said, they first named it ‘Doors’ with Microsoft’s Windows, but when they discovered that the name was already in use, they had to change the name to BluDoors. Relating his experience, Osine said: ‘’When we decided to learn to code at age 12 and 14 respectively, I didn’t let my uncle’s belief that it would be a tough feat to achieve deter me.” On his part, Anesi said: “I learnt to code by myself. I started in 2013, I used sites like Code Academy, Code Avengers and books like ‘Android for Game Development’ and ‘Games for Dummies’,” said Anesi. Meanwhile their mother, Mrs Ngozi Ikhianosime, who is a Mathematics teacher said: “Osine could already use a PC before he could read at age three. It is all he does since he learnt to code.” The mother who ascribed the success to Greensprings Schools, said students of the school have access to computer and internet facilities, just as personal laptops are made available to each of them at home. “After Anesi is through with his secondary school education, he will attend A levels, after which he will go to MIT in Boston for his first degree, because the university has the facilities he needs to learn.” She said. Their father Mr Philip Ikhianosime, who is the Head of Management Services and Human Resource Manager at an Insurance Company says the boys developed interest in PC usage very early. He agrees as well, that his children’s school is very instrumental in their continued interest in programming. Anesi says that he’d like to develop another app that solves real social problems, such as traffic and communication. The brothers are releasing a new version of Crocodile Browser Lite 3.0 this April. - See more at: http://www.vanguardngr.com/2015/05/two-teen-brothers-build-mobile-web-browser/#sthash.ZF2vj1zZ.dpuf NubianBrothaz Boost the eff outta this Salute to those young brothas. Young, black geniuses 🇳🇬🇳🇬🇳🇬🇳🇬🇳🇬🇳🇬

westafricanbaby: fredexmain: im-a-hydra: nubianbrothaz: blackfashion: rudegyalchina: glammednaturally: Now this is something to tal...

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