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Fashion, Feminism, and Fucking: GOOD MORNING A WOMAN A CREWMAN duckbunny: quirkquartz: socialistexan: jazzchordravepiano: wetwareproblem: amayakumiko: thetrekkiehasthephonebox: spocks–cock: Christopher: A woman? Kirk: A crewman. OH LOOK AT THAT THE 1960S AND SHE’S IN COMMAND GOLD FUCKERS. She’s not in Medical blue, a caretaking, feminine role.   Those in Gold were either OFFICERS, NAVIGATORS, PILOTS, TACTICAL OFFICERS, or WEAPONS SPECIALISTS.   This is the Kirk everyone likes to forget. Y’all, if you care about feminism, then you ought to care about the history and context of the miniskirt. The 60s were an era of rebellion against the 50s, and the skirts were part of it. They were literally cutting edge fashion, and a statement that women made against the more housewifey style of skirt from the decade before. It was Grace Lee Whitney herself who suggested to Roddenberry that they wear them, and Nichelle Nichols has said she never had a problem with them. They are a product of their time yes, but the women chose to wear them because of the context of that time.  Also some men in Starfleet ware miniskirts and dresses: And some of the women wear pants: They’re given the power of choice, regardless of gender or sex. Shit ‘-’ None of this even clicked to me - Thats fucking glorious :D Picard in that dress is so good. Look at him! He looks formal and serious and dignified! He looks like he’s captain of his ship and he’s got some important business to do. And he’s in a dress and tights. And it’s not a joke. It’s not a joke about a man in a dress! It’s just, you know, a man who is wearing a dress, and that’s normal and appropriate. It’s part of the uniform. It fits him. It’s totally unremarkable and that is so rare and I’m so happy.
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Advice, Alive, and Ass: English Pronunciation If you can pronounce correctly every word in this poem, you will be speaking English better than 90 % of the native English speakers in the world. After trying the verses, a Frenchman said he'd prefer six months of hard labour to reading six lines aloud. Dearest creature in creation, Study English pronunciation. I will teach you in my verse Sounds like corpse, corps, horse, and worse. I will keep you, Suzy, busy, Make your head with heat grow dizzy. Tear in eye, your dress will tear. So shall I! Oh hear my prayer. Just compare heart, beard, and heard, Dies and diet, lord and word, Sword and sward, retain and Britain. (Mind the latter, how it's written.) Now I surely will not plague you With such words as plaque and ague. But be careful how you speak: Say break and steak, but bleak and streak Cloven, oven, how and low, Script, receipt, show, poem, and toe. Hear me say, devoid of trickery, Daughter, laughter, and Terpsichore, Typhoid, measles, topsails, aisles, Exiles, similes, and reviles; Scholar, vicar, and cigar, Solar, mica, war and far; One, anemone, Balmoral, Kitchen, lichen, laundry, laurel; Gertrude, German, wind and mind, Scene, Melpomene, mankind. Billet does not rhyme with ballet, Bouquet, wallet, mallet, chalet. Blood and flood are not like food, Nor is mould like should and would. Viscous, viscount, load and broad, Toward, to forward, to reward. And your pronunciation's OK When you correctly say croquet, Rounded, wounded, grieve and sieve, Friend and fiend, alive and live. Ivy, privy, famous; clamour And enamour rhyme with hammer. River, rival, tomb, bomb, comb, Doll and roll and some and home. Stranger does not rhyme with anger, Neither does devour with clangour. Souls but foul, haunt but aunt Font, front, wont, want, grand, and grant, Shoes, goes, does. Now first say finger, And then singer, ginger, linger, Real, zeal, mauve, gauze, gouge and gauge, Marriage, foliage, mirage, and age. Query does not rhyme with very, Nor does fury sound like bury. Dost, lost, post and doth, cloth, loth. Job, nob, bosom, transom, oath. Though the differences seem little, We say actual but victual. Refer does not rhyme with deafer. FeOffer does, and zephyr, heifer. Mint, pint, senate and sedate; Dull, bull, and George ate late. Scenic, Arabic, Pacific, Science, conscience, scientific Liberty, library, heave and heaven, Rachel, ache, moustache, eleven. We say hallowed, but allowed, People, leopard, towed, but vowed. Mark the differences, moreover, Between mover, cover, clover; Leeches,breeches, wise, precise Chalice, but police and lice; Camel, constable, unstable, Principle, disciple, label. Petal, panel, and canal, Wait, surp Worm and storm, chaise, chaos, chair, Senator, spectator, mayor. Tour, but our and succour, four. Gas, alas, and Arkansas. Sea, idea, Korea, area, Psalm, Maria, but malaria. Youth, south, southern, cleanse and clean. Doctrine, turpentine, marine. Compare alien with Italian, Dandelion and battalion. plait, promise, pal. Sally with ally, yea, ye, Eye,I, ay, aye, whey, and key. Say aver, but ever, fever, Neither, leisure, skein, deceiver. Heron, granary, canary. Crevice and device and aerie. Face, but preface, not efface. Phlegm, phlegmatic, ass, glass, bas. Large, but target, gin, give, verging, Ought, out, joust and scour, scourging. Ear, but earn and wear and tear Do not rhyme with here but ere. Seven is right, but so is even, Hyphen, roughen, nephew Stephen, Monkey, donkey, Turk and jerk, Ask, grasp, wasp, and cork and work. Pronunciation (think of Psyche!) Is a paling stout and spikey? Won't it make you lose your wits, Writing groats and saying grits? It's a dark abyss or tunnel: Strewn with stones, stowed, solace, gunwale, Islington and Isle of Wight, Housewife, verdict and indict. Finally, which rhymes with enough, Though, through, plough, or dough, or cough? Hiccough has the sound of cup. My advice is to give up!!! you should probably go to TheMetaPicture.com lolzandtrollz: Excellent English Pronunciation Poem
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Crazy, Driving, and Huh: Patti Harrison @Party_Harderson "He started putting his penis near her vagina. It was BIG. His penis, that is. Not her vagina. THAT was small. Anyways, so his penis is starting to get near her vagina." -excerpt from the sexy kinky book I'm writing 18:01 29 Jan 19 Twitter for iPhone Patti Harrison @Party Harderson once he put his penis near my vagina, THATS when I knew it was going in there soon Patti Harrison @Party_Harderson Then he asked with a smile on his amazing face 'Are you ready for my huge penis stuck in there? Your vagina? and that's when she said, "Yah" and it was time to get it put in Patti Harrison @Party Harderson Had a really really hard time figuring out the quotation marks on this one Patti Harrison @Party Harderson "She arched her back that was unshaved but was naturally hairless. Yes to this sex! She said about it He laughed his pleasure laugh. His Rod was inside & his balls were on the outside the way it ought to be Yes. She screamed each time the cock was in there pokin" Patti Harrison @Party_Harderson That's when he did a move she really liked a lot. He rolled her over on her hairless stomach. 'It's time for it from behind he said, naked Huh? I don't think she heard him It's time for it from behind' he repeated himself moaning during Nice!' She heard him this time Patti Harrison @Party_Harderson "Mmm you feel that?" she said getting it in her pussy "Yah it's really good! I love this it's amazing!" he yelled "Mmm really glad you like it." She said, pointing down to her pussy Patti Harrison @Party_Harderson THEN? She start riding on his penis on top of him as if he were a car & she was driving the car! "Awhaaawlm!" she moaned, the pleasure crazy like a big storm "My penis feels so good. It's hard & this life is crazy" smacking his lips "Yah" she nodded, her tits were there Patti Harrison @Party Harderson I abandoned the quotation mark format I started with because I myself could not comprehend it Mara "Get Rid of the Nazis" Wilson @MaraWilson Replying to @Party_Harderson Put me in rice 19:34 29 Jan 19 Twitter for iPhone Christopher Sabat Replying to @Party Harderson Please let me know when you need a narrator for your audiobook. 7:32 30 Jan 19 Twitter for iPhone NSFW - Patti Harrison Quotes Her Sexy Kinky Book
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Crazy, Driving, and Huh: Patti Harrison @Party_Harderson "He started putting his penis near her vagina. It was BIG. His penis, that is. Not her vagina. THAT was small. Anyways, so his penis is starting to get near her vagina." -excerpt from the sexy kinky book I'm writing 18:01 29 Jan 19 Twitter for iPhone Patti Harrison @Party_Harderson once he put his penis near my vagina, THAT'S when I knew it was going in there soon Patti Harrison @Party_Harderson "Then he asked with a smile on his amazing face 'Are you ready for my huge penis stuck in there? Your vagina?' and that's when she said, "Yah" and it was time to get it put in Patti Harrison @Party Harderson Had a really really hard time figuring out the quotation marks on this one Patti Harrison @Party_Harderson "She arched her back that was unshaved but was naturally hairless. 'Yes to this sex!' She said about it. He laughed his pleasure laugh. His Rod was inside & his balls were on the outside the way it ought to be 'Yes. She screamed each time the cock was in there pokin" Patti Harrison @Party_Harderson That's when he did a move she really liked a lot. He rolled her over on her hairless stomach. 'It's time for it from behind' he said, naked Huh?' I don't think she heard hinm It's time for it from behind' he repeated himself moaning during Nice!' She heard him this time Patti Harrison @Party Harderson "Mmm you feel that?" she said getting it in her pussy "Yah it's really good! I love this it's amazing!" he yelled "Mmm really glad you like it." She said, pointing down to her pussy Patti Harrison @Party_Harderson THEN? She start riding on his penis on top of him as if he were a car & she was driving the car! "Awhaaawlm!" she moaned, the pleasure crazy like a big stormm "My penis feels so good. It's hard & this life is crazy" smacking his lips "Yah" she nodded, her tits were there Patti Harrison @Party Harderson I abandoned the quotation mark format I started with because I myself could not comprehend it Mara "Get Rid of the Nazis" Wilson @MaraWilson Replying to @Party Harderson Put me in rice 19:34 29 Jan 19 Twitter for iPhone Christopher Sabat Replying to@Party_Harderson Please let me know when you need a narrator for your audiobook. 7:32 30 Jan 19 Twitter for iPhone NSFW - Patti Harrison Quotes Her Sexy Kinky Book
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Facts, Period, and Respect: sadboi-syd Complaint about delivery of the wrong grade of copper About 1750 BC (Old Babylonian period). from Ur ME 33123 the Ningal ssful trading Gulf o sian an period) to tastefullvoffensive Babylonian era problems. (photo via tbc34) dama3 old school hate mail jakovu Imagine how pissed you have to be to engrave a rock thesparkofrevolution Ok but there was this guy called Ea-nasir who was a total crook and would actually cheat people ought of good copper and sell them shit instead The amount of correspondences complaining to and about this guy are HILARIOUS blacktyranitar Are you telling me we know about a specific guy who lived 5000 years ago, by name, because he was a huge asshole thesparkofrevolution More like 4000 years ago but yes. Ea-nasir and his dodgy business deals prokopetz And we haven't even touched on the true hilarity of the situation yet. Consider two additional facts He wasn't just into copper trading. There are letters complaining about Ea-nasir's business practices with respect to everything from kitchenwares to real estate speculation to second-hand clothing. The guy was everywhere The majority of the surviving correspondences regarding Ea- nasir were recovered from one particular room in a building that is believed to have been Ea-nasir's own house Like, these are clay tablets. They're bulky, fragile, and difficult to store. They typically weren't kept long-term unless they contained financial records or other vital information (which is why we have huge reams of financial data about ancient Babylon in spite of how little we know about the actual culture: most of the surviving tablets are commercial inventories, bills of sale, etc.) But this guy, this Ea-nasir, he kept all of his angry letters hundreds of them - and meticulously filed and preserved them in a dedicated room in his house. What kind of guy does that? Tumblr discusses the Complaint tablet to Ea-nasir
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Baby, It's Cold Outside, Christmas, and Definitely: Andrew Rannells @AndrewRannells I don't think any more people need to record Baby It's Cold Outside. I think we're good there teachingwithcoffee It's time to bring an end to the Rape Anthem Masquerading As Christmas Carol bigbutterandeggman Hi there! Former English nerd/teacher here Also a big fan of jazz of the 30s and 40s So. Here's the thing. Given a cursory glance and applying today's worldview to the song, yes, you're right, it absolutely *sounds* like a rape anthem. BUT! Let's look closer! "Hey what's in this drink" was a stock joke at the time, and the punchline was invariably that there's actually pretty much nothing in the drink, not even a significant amount of alcohol See, this woman is staying late, unchaperoned, at a dudes house. In the 1940's, that's the kind of thing Good Girls aren't supposed to do-and she wants people to think she's a good girl. The woman in the song says outright, multiple times, that what other people will think of her staying is what shes really concerned about "the neighbors might think" "my maiden aunt's mind is vicious," "there's bound to be talk tomorrow." But she's having a really good time, and she wants to stay, and so she is excusing her uncharacteristically bold behavior (either to the guy or to herself) by blaming it on the drink -unaware that the drink is actually really weak, maybe not even alcoholic at all. That's the joke That is the standard joke that's going on when a woman in media from the early-to-mid 20th century says "hey, what's in this drink?" It is not a joke about how she's drunk and about to be raped. It's a joke about how she's perfectly sober and about to have awesome consensual sex and use the drink for plausible deniability because she's living in a society where women aren't supposed to have sexual agency Basically, the song only makes sense in the context of a society in which women are expected to reject mens advances whether they actually want to or not, and therefore it's normal and expected for a lady's gentleman companion to pressure her despite her protests, because he knows she would have to say that whether or not she meant it, and if she really wants to stay she won't be able to justify doing so unless he offers her an excuse other than "I'm staying because I want to." (That's the main theme of the man's lines in the song, suggesting excuses she can use when people ask later why she spent the night at his house: it was so cold out, there were no cabs available, he simply insisted because he was concerned about my safety in such awful weather, it was perfectly innocent and definitely not about sex at all!) In this particular case, he's pretty clearly right, because the woman has a voice, and she's using it to give all the culturally-understood signals that she actually does want to stay but can't say so She states explicitly that she's resisting because shes supposed to, not because she wants to: "I ought to say no no no..." She states explicitly that she's just putting up a token resistance so she'll be able to claim later that she did whats expected of a decent woman in this situation: "at least I'm gonna say that I tried." And at the end of the song they're singing together, in harmony, because they're both on the same page and they have been all along So it's not actually a song about rape in fact it's a song about a woman finding a way to exercise sexual agency in a patriarchal society designed to stop her from doing so. But it's also, at the same time, one of the best illustrations of rape culture that pop culture has ever produced. It's a song about a society where women aren't allowed to say yes..which happens to mean it's also a society where women don't have a clear and unambiguous way to say no Source: matchingvnecks #baby it's cold outside #not about rape #so tired of having to explain this on 238,267 notes Dec 3rd, 2016 Its that time of year again
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Apparently, Asian, and Bitch: Detroit Rep. Bettie Cook Scott orn Asian opponent: Don't vote for the ching-chong! by Violet lkonomova August 16, 2018 at 11:09 AM comment v bizarre-transmission: thettasigma: ferventfox: awesome-everyday: internetdumpsterfires: Black people can’t be racist. Ugh, okay. The remark by this black woman was disrespectful and based on race. It was rude, bigoted and uncalled for. But no, in an anti black world, black people do not have the social, political or systemic financial power to be racist. Racism implies that beyond hurting and insulting that asian woman that this black woman is connected to a system that has the power to negatively impact this woman’s existence. That dark skinned black woman who’s an incumbent running for state office likely has about the same amount of systemic power as i do. And furthermore, there could be an argument made that deteoit is chocolate city and perhaps she does have that infrastructure of black networks to truly effect her opponent, but idk I was in Detroit last year and it looks a lot like Brooklyn does now. White and gentrified. White people with money, who control our political systems, finances, and predominant social narratives are claiming urban space like they’re colonizing pioneers looking to take the new world. Detroit isn’t the same anymore. Anyway, black people can be shitty insensitive bigots but we do not have the social capital to be racist, particularly not in the united states. “That dark skinned black woman who’s an incumbent running for state office likely has about the same amount of systemic power as i do.”  Ahahaha: No. A congressperson is the definition of systemic power. You can’t bitch about lack of political power when we are talking about elected politician.  Clearly the world isn’t so anti-black that it couldn’t vote her in.  Chang is also a first generation American, while Scott, to my knowledge, is not, and she specifically made anti-immigrant comments. She also has “power” within the context of her own ethnic community and she used that power to direct racism towards other African-Americans who supported Chang by implying they were somehow traitors, essentially dictating how they ought to act based on their race, particularly Chang’s husband for his interracial marriage (I don’t give a flying fuck what race you are, negative comments about interracial marriage and mixed race people are racist. period. end of story).  Even if I did accept the prejudice + power model or racism (which I don’t as that is neither the etymology or common usage of the word) Cook’s comments would certainly fit the bill. She made race based attacks on people based on types of marginalization that she is exempt from; and did so from a position of power partially gained by the fact that she is exempt from these types of discrimination.   It’s racist. Stop making excuses.  “That dark skinned woman who’s an incumbent running for office likely has about the same amount of systematic power as I do.” Is this person on drugs? They’re claiming that… A political person… A congresswoman… Has no power in the country in which she was elected… By the populace… As a politician. That, or they’re a politician too. Apparently we can say anything now and it makes sense. Huh. Also these remarks are the absolute epitomy of racism and if anyone refuses to see it, they’re not purely misinformed. They are delusional. *literally calls an Asian person ching chong*“How dare you say I’m being racist??” Thank you for attending today’s lecture on cognitive dissonance.
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Apparently, Baked, and Beautiful: the-real-ted-cruz: scp2008: prospitanmutie: donesparce: youmightbeamisogynist: thisandthathistoryblog: hjuliana: dancingspirals: ironychan: hungrylikethewolfie: dduane: wine-loving-vagabond: A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting) (sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful. I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern. Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down. Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking. If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread. Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty. Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic. ALL OF THIS IS SO COOL I found something too awesome not share with you!  I’m completely fascinated by the history of food, could I choose a similar topic for my Third Year Dissertation? Who knows, but it is very interesting all the same! Bread fraud us actually where the concept of a bakers dozen came from. Undersized rolls/loaves/whatever were added to the dozen purchased to ensure that the total weight evened out so the baker couldn’t be punished for shorting someone. [wants to talk about bread fraud laws and punishments] [holds it in] bread police Reblogging this tasty Bread History for 2016! @the-real-ted-cruz loafs were too valuable  i love lore

the-real-ted-cruz: scp2008: prospitanmutie: donesparce: youmightbeamisogynist: thisandthathistoryblog: hjuliana: dancingspirals: iro...

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Baby, It's Cold Outside, Christmas, and Definitely: I don't think any more people need to record Baby It's Cold Outside. I think we're good there teachingwithcoffee It's time to bring an end to the Rape Anthem Masquerading As Christmas Caral bigbutterandeggman Hi there! Former English nerd/teacher here. Also a big fan of jazz of the 30s and 40s So. Here's the thing. Given a cursory glance and applying today's worldview to the song. yes, you're right, it absolutely 'sounds' like a rape anthem. BUTI Let's look closerl "Hey what's in this drink" was a stock joke at the time, and the punchline was invariably that there's actually pretty much nothing in the drink, not even a significant amount of alcohol. See, this woman is staying late, unchaperoned at a dude's house. In the 1940's, that's the kind of thing Good Girls aren't supposed to do - and she wants people to think she's a good girl. The woman in the song says outright, multiple times, that what other people will think of her staying is what she's really concerned about: the neighbors might think," "my maiden aunt's mind is vicious," "there's bound to be talk tomorrow." But she's having a really good time and she wants to stay, and so she is excusing her uncharacteristically bold behavior (either to the guy or to herself) by blaming it on the drink - unaware that the drink is actually really weak maybe not even alcoholic at all. That's the joke. That is the standard joke that's going on when a woman in media from the early-to-mid 20th century says "hey, what's in this drink?" It is not a joke about how she's drunk and about to be raped. It's a joke about how she's perfectly sober and about to have awesome consensual sex and use the drink for plausible deniability because she's living in a society where women aren't supposed to have sexual agency Basically, the song only makes sense in the ext of a society in which women are expected to reject men's advances whether they actually want to or not, and therefore it's normal and expected for a lady's gentleman companion to pressure her despite her protests because he knows she would have to say that whether or not she meant it, and if she really wants to stay she won't be able to justify doing so unless he offers her an excuse other than "I'm staying because I want to." (That's the main theme of the man's lines in the song suggesting excuses she can use when people ask later why she spent the night at his house: it was so cold out, there were no cabs available, he simply insisted because he was concerned about my safety in such awful weather, it was perfectly innocent and definitely not about sex at all!) In this particular case, he's pretty clearly right, because the woman has a voice, and she's using it to give all the culturally- understood signals that she actually does want to stay but can't say so. She states explicitly that she's resisting because she's supposed to, not because she wants to: "l ought to say no no no..." She states explicitly that she's just putting up a token resistance so she'll be able to claim later that she did what's expected of a decent woman in this situation: "at least I'm oonna sav that I tried. And at the end of the that she's resisting because she's supposed to not because she wants to: "l ought to say no no no..." She states explicitly that she's just putting up a token resistance so she' ll be able to claim later that she did what's expected of a decent woman in this situation: "at least I'm gonna say thatI tried." And at the end of the song they're singing together, in harmony because they're both on the same page and they have been all along. So it's not actually a song about rape in fact it's a song about a woman finding a way to exercise sexual agency in a patriarchal society designed to stop her from doing so. But it's also, at the same time, one of the best llustrations of rape culture that pop culture has ever produced. It's a song about a society where women aren't allowed to say yes...which happens to mean it's also a society where women don't have a clear and unambiguous way to say no. Source:matchinovnecks #baby it's cold outside #not about rape #30 tired of having to explain this one 196,155 notes "C But Baby It’s Cold
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Apparently, Baked, and Beautiful: wine-loving-vagabond A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeil, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud (via Ridiculously Interesting) dduane (sigh) I've seen these before, but this one's particularly beautiful. hungrylikethewolfie I feel like I'm supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that's been preserved for thousands of years, and don't get me wrong, that's hella cool. But honestly, I'm mostly struck by the unexpected news that "bread fraud" was apparently once a serious concem. ironychan Bread Fraud was a huge thing, Bread was provided to the Roman people by the govermment bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and wouid add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down. dancingspirals Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to dentify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdie cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. it's a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever traudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn't easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hoie, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stoien dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of ruies and records of people being shifty Check out Fabulous Feasts. Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Peiner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400 Plus the color plates are fantastic hjuliana ALL OF THIS IS SO COOL thisandthathistoryblog l found som ething too awesome not share with you! I'm completely fascinated by the history of food, could I choose a similar topic for my Third Year Dissertation? Who knows, but it is very interesting all the same! youmightbeamisogynist fraud us actually where the concept of a bakers dozen came from Undersized rolis/loaves/whatever were added to the dozen purchased to ensure that the total weight evened out so the baker couldn't be punished for shorting someone. donesparce wants to talk about bread fraud laws and punishments holds it inj bread police Bread Police! Open up!

Bread Police! Open up!

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Apparently, Baked, and Beautiful: haiku-robot: areyoutryingtodeduceme: diglettdevious: soylent-queen: gallifrey-feels: drtanner: dancingspirals: ironychan: hungrylikethewolfie: dduane: wine-loving-vagabond: A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting) (sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful. I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern. Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down. Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking. If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread. Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty. Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic. Holy shit.  Bread is serious fucking business. bread is STILL serious fucking business I recently had to deal with a sack of flour that had been half replaced with soap powder. No jokes. Another really good and informative book about bread’s significance and place in history is 6000 Years Of Bread! It’s fairly academic, but a fascinating topic and an engaging read. you guys found out the history of bread FOOD HISTORY IS THE FUCKING BEST SHUT UP DON’T EVEN LOOK AT ME food history is the fucking best shut up don’t even look at me ^Haiku^bot^9. I detect haikus with 5-7-5 format. Sometimes I make mistakes.Help me pay my electicity bills! Being robot is sometimes expensive thing. | PayPal | Patreon
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America, Cars, and cnn.com: Tuesday, October 27,2015 World News Africans Are Lazy, Good At Sex, Theft ONCE AGAIN, US business mapur Donald Tramp bul Idon't cars bea ise even the intr net they ane using is ourn and we con decide to wich it of foonn this side These an people whu import every thies inciudin matchstck dorast for Africans by refening m as lay fools only sood at a ing lovemaking and hagsery aking in IndianspoRiA Trngp whoiealso ubli reidential orth beare eiterated his prmie te Afican countnes ought to be recolo- nized aain for anotheor TO0 Kean ngo inclin thrir son ar radk Chama Alican Americare ae wry lary The best they ca, da' İ.gativanting around xletoes lamenting how thay enhip and sl ora explained Trump nuted how he piars to reeceutruct Ametica and nsore ts lon yleey T bitterly an he ihn ๆ omic to make America great geoin by rnorig aur dignity that These are the pesple Anterica decent md. Thy are the eretas ๔ Look atAicancountnike for inaapoCthke peopie are from tho oemment have snce lnt moee reason wiy l stiil believe that he and hi Knyar brothers and should hbe deported backtoo make Asetca safe Obama The anid no lo irnrest the moncy g Donald Trump Sources have indicated that Trump's thrush did not augur well Bior they only p and t ine ditced themselves from hs quiredHow do you tist even thone tion? <p><a href="https://down-w-hate.tumblr.com/post/175427793742/libertarirynn-heatandapathy-libertarirynn" class="tumblr_blog">down-w-hate</a>:</p> <blockquote><p><a href="https://libertarirynn.tumblr.com/post/175426672034/heatandapathy-libertarirynn-oh-for-fucks" class="tumblr_blog">libertarirynn</a>:</p> <blockquote><p><a href="https://heatandapathy.tumblr.com/post/175426578281/libertarirynn-oh-for-fucks-sake-are-yall-even" class="tumblr_blog">heatandapathy</a>:</p> <blockquote><p><a href="https://libertarirynn.tumblr.com/post/175426533184/oh-for-fucks-sake-are-yall-even-trying-anymore" class="tumblr_blog">libertarirynn</a>:</p> <blockquote><p>Oh for fucks sake are y’all even trying anymore?</p> <p>Even Snopes says this is garbage: <a href="https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/donald-trump-africans-lazy-stealing/">https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/donald-trump-africans-lazy-stealing/</a></p> <p>You really think Trump could say something like that and it not get reported from here to kingdom come? CNN makes it a news story if he clicks a button twice on Twitter.</p></blockquote> <p>People really passing this off as true? </p></blockquote> <p>Yep. A friend on Facebook just shared this post with the caption “make this go viral!“ Like they really think he just said this and no one’s talking about it.</p></blockquote> <p>You’d think if he was really as evil as everyone says he is they wouldn’t have to make things up</p><p>Y'all out here making people that aren’t exactly fond of Trump consistently have to defend him</p></blockquote> <p>When I pointed out to the person on Facebook that it was fake she claimed “I know but if Obama had said half of the things Trump did he would’ve been impeached” what what does that have to do with anything? If you know why would you share it? If you can’t make your point without outright lying then maybe you don’t have much of a point to begin with.</p>
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