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Summer, Anti, and Congo: Gorillas posing for groupfies with anti-poaching officers in Congo look like they’re about to drop the hottest beat of the summer

Gorillas posing for groupfies with anti-poaching officers in Congo look like they’re about to drop the hottest beat of the summer

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Alive, Animals, and Children: (Ja)ded @thefathippy 20h maooo000 Judy Harris Yesterday at 5:04 PM. 0+ Why the zoo charge us to look at animals they stole? this ain't even yall shit Sharon @MySharona1987 Replying to @thefathippy To be fair, they are doing a lot to help pandas screw. 4:56 AM- 11 Jul 2018 mysharona1987: little-butch-crouton: severelynerdysheep: somehavegonemissing: spookyboyfelix: princess-nakamoto: mysharona1987: No, seriously: I do think zoos do a *lot* of good. Much of the time. It’s not necessarily a Seaworld situation. Yeah a lot of animals don’t even have habitats anymore anyway. So zoos are just giving them a home. Even if people come to see them nearly everyday, its better then being kicked out of their habitat eventually by man. The funds from zoos are often used to feed the animals anyway (most zoos are non profit they cant use that money for people) if you pay to go to the zoo you are paying to keep those animals alive Zoos also educate people about animals, allowing for people to fall in love with the weird and wonderful. They help promote habitat preservation and putting a stop to poaching. Please don’t dismiss zoos, they’re not the same places as they used to be in the 1800s, or even the mid 1900s. So while Zoos are absolutely miles better than they were historical, there are still many serious issues. In terms of education, while I totally get why most people believe that zoos teach people (children especially) about how to protect animals and their habitats and are great places of education, this is not actually the case. In reality viewing captive animals in zoos only teaches people how animals react to boredom, depression, and stress in captive situations. The most effective methods of education in zoos come via presenting videos, documentaries, interactive modules, graphic displays, and computer simulations. which all show animals in their natural environments and do not require any animals to actually be kept in zoos. In terms of the work Zoos to in regards to species conservation and habitat preservation, zoos really are not effective, especially compared to other conservation and preservation work. While there are zoos that do good conservation work, most of the significant conservation work is not from zoos but other organizations that work with wildlife and natural habitats. Most animals in captivity are not even classified as endangered, with the priority of Zoos being in getting hold of animals popular with visitors, rather than those who face extinction. When it comes to breeding programs (and breeding animals in captivity aren’t the best way to help in conservation)   zoos do spend plenty of money on these programs however half of the animals being bred by Zoos are not classed as endangered in the wild and 25% are not threatened species but ones popular with visitors. It’s also actually massively more expensive to keep animals captive in zoos than to protect equivalent numbers of them in the wild! When it comes to the research, few Zoos actually support meaningful scientific research (with fewer employing scientists with full-time research jobs) and of those that do employ scientists its common for these scientists to study free-living animals rather than those within the zoo. Due to the nature of any research that does take place in zoos, the results of this research also generates little information about how to best conserve species in the wild as studies of captive animals have limited benefits to animals in the wild and animals brought up in captivity are less likely to survive in the wild if reintroduced as they often don’t have the natural behaviors needed for survival in the wild. More effective methods of habitat preservation and species conservations would be a multipronged approach tackling habitat loss and climate change, investing in conservation programs in the wild, education, working with local communities, seriously addressing poaching etc. and also to move away from the Zoo model towards more ethical and effective models of species conservation.  Just a few of the other ethical issues with Zoos include surplus animals, who, when grow older, and are less attractive to patrons, will often be sold or killed. Animals who breed frequently also are sometimes sold to game farms and ranches where hunters pay to kill them and other surplus animals are sometimes sold to roadside zoos,, private individuals, animal dealers, or to laboratories for experimentation purposes. The animals not sold often end up being fed to other zoo animals. In terms of the health of these captive animals, many develop health conditions and mental health problems such as Zoochosis. Of course, a major problem with zoos as well is that the animals who live there are kept in enclosures that don’t allow them to live their lives in a natural way and don’t compare with the natural habitat the animals were meant to be in. Zoo animals have to spend day after day, week after week, year after year in the exact same enclosure. This makes their lives very monotonous. Take elephants, for example, elephants in the wild, are used to traveling many miles a day in herds of about ten related adults and their offspring but in zoos are usually kept in pairs or even isolated in incredibly small enclosures compared to what they are used to in the wild. Elephants kept in zoos often show many signs of being mental distress and the average lifespan of elephants in zoos is around 16-18 years, instead of the 50-70 years they can live in the wild. I’m just going to copy paste your response when people ask me what I’m going to school for. I’m very pro zoo and I want animals in their natural habitat just as much. This is genuinely quite an interesting discussion.
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Bad, Children, and Facebook: did you know? did-you-kno.tumblr.com Michael the gorilla was taught sign language by Koko, the first signing gorilla. He began signing "Squash meat gorilla. Mouth tooth Cry sharp-noise loud. Bad think-trouble look- face. Cut/neck lip (girl) hole." Researchers believed this was a description of the poaching death of his mother. did-you-kno.tumblr.com didyouknowblog.com Cohen Gi n facebook.com/didyouknowblog death-limes: venipede: osteophagy: endcetaceanexploitation: Washoe was a chimp who was taught sign language. One of Washoe’s caretakers was pregnant and missed work for many weeks after she miscarried. Roger Fouts recounts the following situation: “People who should be there for her and aren’t are often given the cold shoulder—her way of informing them that she’s miffed at them. Washoe greeted Kat [the caretaker] in just this way when she finally returned to work with the chimps. Kat made her apologies to Washoe, then decided to tell her the truth, signing “MY BABY DIED.” Washoe stared at her, then looked down. She finally peered into Kat’s eyes again and carefully signed “CRY”, touching her cheek and drawing her finger down the path a tear would make on a human (Chimpanzees don’t shed tears). Kat later remarked that one sign told her more about Washoe and her mental capabilities than all her longer, grammatically perfect sentences.“ [23] Washoe herself lost two children; one baby died shortly after birth of a heart defect, the other baby, Sequoyah, died of a staph infection at two months of age. more about Washoe: after the death of her children, researchers were determined to have Washoe raise a baby and brought in a ten month chimpanzee named Loulis. one of the caretakers went to Washoe’s enclosure and signed “i have a baby for you.” Washoe became incredibly excited, yelling and swaying from side to side, signing “baby” over and over again. then she signed “my baby.” the caretaker came back with Loulis, and Washoe’s excitement disappeared entirely. she refused to pick Loulis up, instead signing “baby” apathetically; it was clear that the baby she thought she was getting was going to be Sequoyah. eventually Washoe did approach Loulis, and by the next day the two had bonded and from then on she was utterly devoted to him. *information shamelessly paraphrased from When Elephants Weep by Jeffrey Masson. Even more interestingly, after Washoe and Loulis bonded, she started teaching him American Sign Language the same way that human parents teach their children language. It only took Loulis eight days to learn his first sign from Washoe, and aside from the seven that his human handlers learned around him, he learned to speak in ASL just as fluently as Washoe and was able to communicate with humans in the same way she could. now if y'all don’t think this is the tightest shit you can get outta my face
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Bad, Children, and Facebook: did you know? did-you-kno.tumblr.com Michael the gorilla was taught sign language by Koko, the first signing gorilla. He began signing "Squash meat gorilla. Mouth tooth Cry sharp-noise loud. Bad think-trouble look- face. Cut/neck lip (girl) hole." Researchers believed this was a description of the poaching death of his mother. did-you-kno.tumblr.com didyouknowblog.com Cohen Gi n facebook.com/didyouknowblog death-limes: venipede: osteophagy: endcetaceanexploitation: Washoe was a chimp who was taught sign language. One of Washoe’s caretakers was pregnant and missed work for many weeks after she miscarried. Roger Fouts recounts the following situation: “People who should be there for her and aren’t are often given the cold shoulder—her way of informing them that she’s miffed at them. Washoe greeted Kat [the caretaker] in just this way when she finally returned to work with the chimps. Kat made her apologies to Washoe, then decided to tell her the truth, signing “MY BABY DIED.” Washoe stared at her, then looked down. She finally peered into Kat’s eyes again and carefully signed “CRY”, touching her cheek and drawing her finger down the path a tear would make on a human (Chimpanzees don’t shed tears). Kat later remarked that one sign told her more about Washoe and her mental capabilities than all her longer, grammatically perfect sentences.“ [23] Washoe herself lost two children; one baby died shortly after birth of a heart defect, the other baby, Sequoyah, died of a staph infection at two months of age. more about Washoe: after the death of her children, researchers were determined to have Washoe raise a baby and brought in a ten month chimpanzee named Loulis. one of the caretakers went to Washoe’s enclosure and signed “i have a baby for you.” Washoe became incredibly excited, yelling and swaying from side to side, signing “baby” over and over again. then she signed “my baby.” the caretaker came back with Loulis, and Washoe’s excitement disappeared entirely. she refused to pick Loulis up, instead signing “baby” apathetically; it was clear that the baby she thought she was getting was going to be Sequoyah. eventually Washoe did approach Loulis, and by the next day the two had bonded and from then on she was utterly devoted to him. *information shamelessly paraphrased from When Elephants Weep by Jeffrey Masson. Even more interestingly, after Washoe and Loulis bonded, she started teaching him American Sign Language the same way that human parents teach their children language. It only took Loulis eight days to learn his first sign from Washoe, and aside from the seven that his human handlers learned around him, he learned to speak in ASL just as fluently as Washoe and was able to communicate with humans in the same way she could. now if y'all don’t think this is the tightest shit you can get outta my face
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Animals, Bored, and Cats: Tiger-o-war... Zoo qives visitors the chance to test their sfrength against big cafs. <p><a href="http://hayjulay.tumblr.com/post/81531484743/poorlittlequeenie-thebearqueen" class="tumblr_blog">hayjulay</a>:</p> <blockquote><p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://poorlittlequeenie.tumblr.com/post/81022659100/thebearqueen-nothing-here-go-away">poorlittlequeenie</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://thebearqueen.tumblr.com/post/76499909756/nothing-here-go-away-wolfstrider">thebearqueen</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://nothing-here-go-away.tumblr.com/post/76489880374/wolfstrider-thomassawyerismyname">nothing-here-go-away</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://wolfstrider.tumblr.com/post/76271278301">wolfstrider</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://thomassawyerismyname.tumblr.com/post/75977695598/mangiemay-irvinator1-booksarerevolution">thomassawyerismyname</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://mangiemay.tumblr.com/post/75965604560/irvinator1-booksarerevolution-vegankween">mangiemay</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://irvinator1.tumblr.com/post/75964453004">irvinator1</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://booksarerevolution.tumblr.com/post/75074891692/vegankween-1-those-tigers-look-thin-2-zoos">booksarerevolution</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://vegankween.tumblr.com/post/75074180298/1-those-tigers-look-thin-2-zoos-are-fucking">vegankween</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p>1. Those tigers look thin.</p> <p>2. Zoos are fucking stupid.</p> <p>3. Capturing wild animals and using them for human entertainment is a super shitty thing to do.</p> <p>4. This is not cool.</p> </blockquote> <p>This is abuse and horrible.  Zoos are prisons.</p> </blockquote> <p>Some zoos only take old animals to where they are given an easy life. Their maintenance is funded by people coming into the zoo.</p> </blockquote> <p>Those tigers are not thin.</p> <p>“Zoos are fucking stupid” wow such science you sold me</p> <p>They weren’t captured for this purpose, they probably weren’t captured at all, it’s called rescuing. </p> <p>This is cool.</p> <p>This is not abuse, it’s actually exercise if you think about it.</p> <p>Zoos are not prisons. Zoos allow us to rescue animals, research them, and protect them from hunters and the dangers that we, as humans, impose on them.</p> <p>I’m so done with all the shit about zoos on my fucking dash. </p> <p>Zoos literally save animals every day so why don’t you do your freaking research.</p> </blockquote> <p>This comment is perfect^</p> </blockquote> <p>Animals come to zoos as a result of </p> <ul><li>being born captive</li> <li>getting injured in the wild and rescued to live a healthy life in captivity</li> <li>being rescued from black market dealers, private collectors, or the like who decide that they can no longer care for the animals or who had been illegally keeping the animals</li> <li>being in a breeding program to increase their numbers because the animal is endangered in the wild</li> </ul><p>If you knew anything about tigers at all, you’d know that they are endangered in the wild due to poaching and hunting. It is of utmost importance that their numbers increase, or they will go extinct within the next fifty years. I don’t know what zoo this is so I don’t know their reputation, but the tigers look healthy, and this tug-of-war is good for them because some animals get stressed in zoos when they are bored. This isn’t solely to entertain zoo guests, it is to give the tigers something fun to do.</p> <p>Zoos do not snatch animals from the wild without a good reason. If you want to protest animal captivity, go to SeaWorld and protest the orcas being kept there, they are far too large to belong in such cramped spaces and they are solely kept for entertainment.</p> <p>Thank you and good day.</p> </blockquote> <p>ALSO ITS NOT LIKE THEY’RE FORCING THE TIGERS TO GRAB THE ROPE, THE TIGER WANTS TO PLAY</p> </blockquote> <p>Tigers play just like domestic cats play with each other, this is for the educational benefit of the visitors and the enrichment benefit of the tigers. Also word to the comment above. Tigers are endangered to the point that they cannot repopulate themselves in the wild, they need the help of captive institutions like zoos, where they live carefree lives free of stress and can breed and birth without fear that other predators and mating competitors will come along and eat their cubs.<br/><br/>Furthermore, these tigers are NOT thin. In fact, one of the ones in the large group looks borderline obese. People who know nothing about animals need to stop talking about animals.</p> </blockquote> <p>Boosting the shit out of this because I’m so damn tired of whiney morons (who probably never get outside) bitching about animal’s rights when they really have no fucking clue.</p> <p>DO YOUR GODDAMN HOMEWORK.</p> </blockquote> <p>ALL OF EVERYTHING IN THIS COMMENTARY</p></blockquote>
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