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Alive, Being Alone, and Bad: Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15 Okay, one last thread. And then I'm watching Gilmore Girls. Idk what they're teaching about Nazis in school these days but here goes.. 275 7.9K 9.6K Katie @YourRacingBelle Follow When Hitler marched into Poland in 1939, my grandma was two years old. It was not immediately obvious that anything was changing in her town 5:46 PM-15 Aug 2017 from Alafaya, FL 1,351 Retweets 2,970 Likes OOOOOO 67th 143.0K Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15 Replying to @YourRacingBelle When she was 4 years old, she was playing outside when she suddenly heard yelling and screaming. She looked across the yard to see Nazis. 4 t 306 1.7K Katie @YourRacingBele Aug 15 And to see the dead body of her three year old neighbor boy who had been playing loudly in his yard. The Nazis were annoyed by the noise. Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15 They shot him dead on the spot. 3 years old. Dead from a Nazi bullet. Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15 A couple of months later, my grandmother and her family were woken up very early in the morning. They were told to get up and go outside 2t 250 1.5K Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15 They were marched to the train station. Her father got on one train. Her mother her baby sisters, and her were put on another 91 ti 252 1.5K Katie @YourRacingBele Aug 15 On the first day my grandma, who was five now, was in Majdanek, she and the other children were told to line up outside before breakfast. 91 tl 253 1.5K Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15 The Nazi soldier counted each child. One...two...three...our... ive...six...seven...eight...nine...the tenth child was shot. 2 311 1.5K Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15 The soldier told the children that any bad child would be shot. So they must work and not complain or be loud. Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15 My grandma was a Polish Catholic, which was only a couple steps above a Polish Jew. One of the officer's wives decided she wanted a child 2 t 279 1.6K Katie @YourRacingBele Aug 15 So she "adopted" my grandma. Changed her name. Told her her mother was dead. And that she was a German now Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15 The day the news broke that the Allies were coming to Poland, the German officer and his wife left in a hurry. In so much of a hurry... Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15 That they forgot my grandma, their special new daughter. She was found in one of the officer's homes after 3 days alone t 267 1.6K Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15 The Red Cross took her in, and they asked her her name, which she barely remembered. They spent six months looking for her family 253 1.6K Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15 They were eventually found, somehow all alive. Aunts and uncles weren't, but mother, father, and baby sister were 4 th 246 1.9 Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15 My grandma did not remember the Nazi officer and his wife with fondness. She did not view them as humans or benefactors. Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15 And she did not tell me this story until the day she took me to the gates of Majdanek. Where she broke down screaming at the memories. 4 t1 309 2.2K Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15 That was in 2001. 56 years after she was rescued by the Red Cross. Those horrors did not fade with time. They were ingrained in her brain 4 2.5K Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15 Studies show the Holocaust changed the DNA of its victims. Changed their mental make up. I live with that DNA, with that change. Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15 And if you believe that Neo-Nazis are "good people" or they "deserve a voice", I remind you of a three year old boy shot dead Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15 That is what giving the Nazis a voice in 1933 led to. It led to my grandma sobbing outside a place where she was imprisoned 10 500 2.6K Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15 The Nazis did not start with these things. They started with a voice. And a message. And it ended in unspeakable horrors. Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15 And that? That is why Neo-Nazis don't deserve a voice. Because those they worship didn't just talk. 91 775 4.4K
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Church, Desperate, and Family: apismel1fera: grrlpup: antifainternational: mousezilla: rhube: fahrlight: westsemiteblues: returnofthejudai: robowolves: bemusedlybespectacled: gdfalksen: Chiune Sugihara. This man saved 6000 Jews. He was a Japanese diplomat in Lithuania. When the Nazis began rounding up Jews, Sugihara risked his life to start issuing unlawful travel visas to Jews. He hand-wrote them 18 hrs a day. The day his consulate closed and he had to evacuate, witnesses claim he was STILL writing visas and throwing from the train as he pulled away. He saved 6000 lives. The world didn’t know what he’d done until Israel honored him in 1985, the year before he died. Why can’t we have a movie about him? He was often called “Sempo”, an alternative reading of the characters of his first name, as that was easier for Westerners to pronounce. His wife, Yukiko, was also a part of this; she is often credited with suggesting the plan. The Sugihara family was held in a Soviet POW camp for 18 months until the end of the war; within a year of returning home, Sugihara was asked to resign - officially due to downsizing, but most likely because the government disagreed with his actions. He didn’t simply grant visas - he granted visas against direct orders, after attempting three times to receive permission from the Japanese Foreign Ministry and being turned down each time. He did not “misread” orders; he was in direct violation of them, with the encouragement and support of his wife. He was honoured as Righteous Among the Nations in 1985, a year before he died in Kamakura; he and his descendants have also been granted permanent Israeli citizenship. He was also posthumously awarded the Life Saving Cross of Lithuania (1993); Commander’s Cross Order of Merit of the Republic of Poland (1996); and the Commander’s Cross with Star of the Order of Polonia Restituta (2007). Though not canonized, some Eastern Orthodox Christians recognize him as a saint. Sugihara was born in Gifu on the first day of 1900, January 1. He achieved top marks in his schooling; his father wanted him to become a physician, but Sugihara wished to pursue learning English. He deliberately failed the exam by writing only his name and then entered Waseda, where he majored in English. He joined the Foreign Ministry after graduation and worked in the Manchurian Foreign Office in Harbin (where he learned Russian and German; he also converted to the Eastern Orthodox Church during this time). He resigned his post in protest over how the Japanese government treated the local Chinese citizens. He eventually married Yukiko Kikuchi, who would suggest and encourage his acts in Lithuania; they had four sons together. Chiune Sugihara passed away July 31, 1986, at the age of 86. Until her own passing in 2008, Yukiko continued as an ambassador of his legacy. It is estimated that the Sugiharas saved between 6,000-10,000 Lithuanian and Polish Jewish people. It’s a tragedy that the Sugiharas aren’t household names. They are among the greatest heroes of WWII. Is it because they were from an Axis Power? Is it because they aren’t European? I don’t know. But I’ve decided to always reblog them when they come across my dash. If I had the money, I would finance a movie about them. He told an interviewer: You want to know about my motivation, don’t you? Well. It is the kind of sentiments anyone would have when he actually sees refugees face to face, begging with tears in their eyes. He just cannot help but sympathize with them. Among the refugees were the elderly and women. They were so desperate that they went so far as to kiss my shoes, Yes, I actually witnessed such scenes with my own eyes. Also, I felt at that time, that the Japanese government did not have any uniform opinion in Tokyo. Some Japanese military leaders were just scared because of the pressure from the Nazis; while other officials in the Home Ministry were simply ambivalent. People in Tokyo were not united. I felt it silly to deal with them. So, I made up my mind not to wait for their reply. I knew that somebody would surely complain about me in the future. But, I myself thought this would be the right thing to do. There is nothing wrong in saving many people’s lives….The spirit of humanity, philanthropy…neighborly friendship…with this spirit, I ventured to do what I did, confronting this most difficult situation—and because of this reason, I went ahead with redoubled courage. He died in nearly complete obscurity in Japan. His neighbors were shocked when people from all over, including Israeli diplomatic personnel, showed up at quiet little Mr. Sugihara’s funeral. I will forever reblog this, I wish more people would know about them! I liked this before when it had way less information. Thank you, history-sharers. Tucked away in a corner in L.A.’s Little Tokyo is a life-sized statue of Chiune, seated on a bench and smiling gently as he holds out a visa.  The stone next to him bears a quote from the Talmud; “He who saves one life, saves the entire world.”   I had no idea it existed until a few weeks ago, but it’s since become one of my favorite pieces of public art.  Chiune Sugihara.  Original antifa. always reblog Chiune Sugihara. I have his picture over my desk at work to remind me what’s important. heroic
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House, Poland, and Jews: A Polish citizen in Warsaw, Poland returns from the store, only to find several Jews hiding in his house shortly after the German invasion of the city, 27 September 1939, colourized

A Polish citizen in Warsaw, Poland returns from the store, only to find several Jews hiding in his house shortly after the German invasion o...

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Anaconda, Belgium, and Lol: 'All further migration from mainly Muslim countries should be stopped Source: Chatham House, https://www.chathamhouse.org/expert/comment/what-do-europeans-think-about-muslim-immigration 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 Total Belgium Germany GreeceSpin FranceayraUK ungary Poland AgreeNeither agree nor disagree Disagree aribelli: c-bassmeow: aribelli: c-bassmeow: Most Europeans agree with a Muslim ban with Spain and the U.K. being the most tolerant. https://www.chathamhouse.org/expert/comment/what-do-europeans-think-about-muslim-immigration The rise of right wing nationalism is not just an isolated US phenomenon. Not only it isn’t just the US, but Europe started much earlier. Italy in particular never got around dealing with fascists (even monuments to the regime are still up), the Italian right is notoriously and literally still fascist (there is even a party called Movimento Fascismo e Libertà - Fascism and Freedom Movement) with parties like CasaPound Italia and Forza Nuova still active, with the center-right being not far off but mostly keeping a public face of only “conservatives”. Mussolini’s granddaughter Alessandra Mussolini is still active in politics and a member of the senate and of the European Parliament for Central Italy. This is 100% true, Europe has a long history with both far left and far right politics, but the far right was still for the most part not that popular except in isolated incidents like in Ukraine or Golden Dawn in Greece, but I make the claim that the far right is making a pretty effective and large comeback because neoliberal austerity measures and other economic factors have hurt many European countries. Since the left in these countries has been ineffective in addressing the grievances of the people or flat out infiltrated or thwarted by the state. The populist right was emotionally appealing in a time of economic need (much like the Nazis were in Germany who scapegoated Jewish people) and has thus surged by blaming refugees, immigration, etc. The left would have been able to counter the right in many of these countries without using economic scapegoating but as I said many were prevented or attacked. So although the presence of the far right has never left Europe I do think there are reasons to believe it’s on the rise just like in the United States. In Austria the Greens BARELY beat the far right wing party and Poland is a good example of the far right taking over as well. Oh yes, absolutely. The combined economic crisis of early 2000’s and the current immigration/refugee situation created the perfect panoramic for fear mongering and scapegoating tactics that the extreme right is so adept at using. They’ve been gaining ground for quite some time now. The ineptitude and infighting common in the European left also meant they were unable to create a coherent narrative and opposition (and don’t get me started on the racism is not a thing here” moderates).I wrote only about Italy because that’s what I have personal and deeper experience with, and to remember/tell people that fascism never really went away. (I still want to go back there and deface that horrid obelisk to Mussolini in front of the Foro Italico…) Well thank you so much, because I learned something today. Had no idea musollinis granddaughter was still active omg thats so scary lol and yeah Europe is not a post-racial utopia and that includes Scandinavia which some liberals claim is the zenith of all morality lol
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Anaconda, Belgium, and Muslim: 'All further migration from mainly Muslim countries should be stopped Source: Chatham House, https://www.chathamhouse.org/expert/comment/what-do-europeans-think-about-muslim-immigration 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 Total Belgium Germany GreeceSpin FranceayraUK ungary Poland AgreeNeither agree nor disagree Disagree aribelli: c-bassmeow: Most Europeans agree with a Muslim ban with Spain and the U.K. being the most tolerant. https://www.chathamhouse.org/expert/comment/what-do-europeans-think-about-muslim-immigration The rise of right wing nationalism is not just an isolated US phenomenon. Not only it isn’t just the US, but Europe started much earlier. Italy in particular never got around dealing with fascists (even monuments to the regime are still up), the Italian right is notoriously and literally still fascist (there is even a party called Movimento Fascismo e Libertà - Fascism and Freedom Movement) with parties like CasaPound Italia and Forza Nuova still active, with the center-right being not far off but mostly keeping a public face of only “conservatives”. Mussolini’s granddaughter Alessandra Mussolini is still active in politics and a member of the senate and of the European Parliament for Central Italy. This is 100% true, Europe has a long history with both far left and far right politics, but the far right was still for the most part not that popular except in isolated incidents like in Ukraine or Golden Dawn in Greece, but I make the claim that the far right is making a pretty effective and large comeback because neoliberal austerity measures and other economic factors have hurt many European countries. Since the left in these countries has been ineffective in addressing the grievances of the people or flat out infiltrated or thwarted by the state. The populist right was emotionally appealing in a time of economic need (much like the Nazis were in Germany who scapegoated Jewish people) and has thus surged by blaming refugees, immigration, etc. The left would have been able to counter the right in many of these countries without using economic scapegoating but as I said many were prevented or attacked. So although the presence of the far right has never left Europe I do think there are reasons to believe its on the rise just like in the United States. In Austria the Greens BARELY beat the far right wing party and Poland is a good example of the far right taking over as well.
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Poland, Hope, and This: Greetings from Poland! I hope u like this view.

Greetings from Poland! I hope u like this view.

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Alive, Church, and Confused: "Here is the list of Jews you required. Bishop Chrysostomos, 1943 Accidental Talmudist.com girlactionfigure: Bishop Chrysostomos, the spiritual leader of the Greek island of Zakynthos, stuck his neck out to save all 275 of the island’s Jews during the Nazi occupation of Greece. On September 9, 1943, Germany occupied the Italian territories, including Greece. Immediately, the German commander ordered all Greek Jews to be assembled for deportation to Poland. The mayor of Zakynthos, Lucas Carrer, was ordered to prepare a list of Jews on the island. Mayor Carrer made the list but before handing it over to the Nazis he went to the local church leader, Bishop Chrysostomos, for counsel. The bishop told the mayor to burn the list. He then went to the German commander and begged him not to deport the Jews. They were law-abiding citizens with the same rights as all other Greeks. The officer was unmoved and insisted on receiving the list of all Jews on the island. Bishop Chrysostomos took out a slip of paper, wrote his own name on it, and handed it to the German officer. “Here is the list of Jews you required,” he said. This action confused the Nazi, and gained the bishop and mayor the time they needed. Together, they warned all the Jews of Zakynthos that their lives were in danger. They urged their Jewish brethren to hide in the mountains, and promised that Greek islanders would provide them with food and shelter. The people of Zakynthos, led by their brave bishop and mayor, kept their hidden Jews alive until the island was liberated by the Soviet army in late 1944. In 1978 Bishop Chrysostomos and Mayor Carrer were honored as Righteous Among the Nations by Yad Vashem in Jerusalem. For their great leadership and courage in saving the lives of 275 Jews, we honor Bishop Chrysostomos and Mayor Carrer of Zakynthos, Greece as this week’s Thursday Heroes at Accidental Talmudist.
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