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solacekames: 8:08 AM PDT 8/16/2019 by Kareem Abdul-JabbarThe NBA great and Hollywood Reporter columnist, a friend of the late martial arts star, believes the filmmaker was sloppy, somewhat racist and shirked his responsibility to basic truth in ‘Once Upon a Time in Hollywood.’Remember that time Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. kidney-punched a waiter for serving soggy croutons in his tomato soup? How about the time the Dalai Lama got wasted and spray-painted “Karma Is a Beach” on the Tibetan ambassador’s limo? Probably not, since they never happened. But they could happen if a filmmaker decides to write those scenes into his or her movie. And, even though we know the movie is fiction, those scenes will live on in our shared cultural conscience as impressions of those real people, thereby corrupting our memory of them built on their real-life actions.That’s why filmmakers have a responsibility when playing with people’s perceptions of admired historic people to maintain a basic truth about the content of their character. Quentin Tarantino’s portrayal of Bruce Lee in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood does not live up to this standard. Of course, Tarantino has the artistic right to portray Bruce any way he wants. But to do so in such a sloppy and somewhat racist way is a failure both as an artist and as a human being.This controversy has left me torn. Tarantino is one of my favorite filmmakers because he is so bold, uncompromising and unpredictable. There’s a giddy energy in his movies of someone who loves movies and wants you to love them, too. I attend each Tarantino film as if it were an event, knowing that his distillation of the ’60s and ’70s action movies will be much more entertaining than a simple homage. That’s what makes the Bruce Lee scenes so disappointing, not so much on a factual basis, but as a lapse of cultural awareness.Bruce Lee was my friend and teacher. That doesn’t give him a free pass for how he’s portrayed in movies. But it does give me some insight into the man. I first met Bruce when I was a student at UCLA looking to continue my martial arts studies, which I started in New York City. We quickly developed a friendship as well as a student-teacher relationship. He taught me the discipline and spirituality of martial arts, which was greatly responsible for me being able to play competitively in the NBA for 20 years with very few injuries.During our years of friendship, he spoke passionately about how frustrated he was with the stereotypical representation of Asians in film and TV. The only roles were for inscrutable villains or bowing servants. In Have Gun - Will Travel, Paladin’s faithful Chinese servant goes by the insulting name of “Hey Boy” (Kam Tong). He was replaced in season four by a female character referred to as “Hey Girl” (Lisa Lu). Asian men were portrayed as sexless accessories to a scene, while the women were subservient. This was how African-American men and women were generally portrayed until the advent of Sidney Poitier and blaxploitation films. Bruce was dedicated to changing the dismissive image of Asians through his acting, writing and promotion of Jeet Kune Do, his interpretation of martial arts.That’s why it disturbs me that Tarantino chose to portray Bruce in such a one-dimensional way. The John Wayne machismo attitude of Cliff (Brad Pitt), an aging stuntman who defeats the arrogant, uppity Chinese guy harks back to the very stereotypes Bruce was trying to dismantle. Of course the blond, white beefcake American can beat your fancy Asian chopsocky dude because that foreign crap doesn’t fly here.I might even go along with the skewered version of Bruce if that wasn’t the only significant scene with him, if we’d also seen a glimpse of his other traits, of his struggle to be taken seriously in Hollywood. Alas, he was just another Hey Boy prop to the scene. The scene is complicated by being presented as a flashback, but in a way that could suggest the stuntman’s memory is cartoonishly biased in his favor. Equally disturbing is the unresolved shadow that Cliff may have killed his wife with a spear gun because she nagged him. Classic Cliff. Is Cliff more heroic because he also doesn’t put up with outspoken women?I was in public with Bruce several times when some random jerk would loudly challenge Bruce to a fight. He always politely declined and moved on. First rule of Bruce’s fight club was don’t fight — unless there is no other option. He felt no need to prove himself. He knew who he was and that the real fight wasn’t on the mat, it was on the screen in creating opportunities for Asians to be seen as more than grinning stereotypes. Unfortunately, Once Upon a Time in Hollywood prefers the good old ways.: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar: Bruce Lee Was My Friend, and Tarantino's Movie Disrespects Him 8:08 AM PDT 8/16/2019 by Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Alamy Stock Photo Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Bruce Lee during the filming of 1978's 'Game of Death.' solacekames: 8:08 AM PDT 8/16/2019 by Kareem Abdul-JabbarThe NBA great and Hollywood Reporter columnist, a friend of the late martial arts star, believes the filmmaker was sloppy, somewhat racist and shirked his responsibility to basic truth in ‘Once Upon a Time in Hollywood.’Remember that time Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. kidney-punched a waiter for serving soggy croutons in his tomato soup? How about the time the Dalai Lama got wasted and spray-painted “Karma Is a Beach” on the Tibetan ambassador’s limo? Probably not, since they never happened. But they could happen if a filmmaker decides to write those scenes into his or her movie. And, even though we know the movie is fiction, those scenes will live on in our shared cultural conscience as impressions of those real people, thereby corrupting our memory of them built on their real-life actions.That’s why filmmakers have a responsibility when playing with people’s perceptions of admired historic people to maintain a basic truth about the content of their character. Quentin Tarantino’s portrayal of Bruce Lee in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood does not live up to this standard. Of course, Tarantino has the artistic right to portray Bruce any way he wants. But to do so in such a sloppy and somewhat racist way is a failure both as an artist and as a human being.This controversy has left me torn. Tarantino is one of my favorite filmmakers because he is so bold, uncompromising and unpredictable. There’s a giddy energy in his movies of someone who loves movies and wants you to love them, too. I attend each Tarantino film as if it were an event, knowing that his distillation of the ’60s and ’70s action movies will be much more entertaining than a simple homage. That’s what makes the Bruce Lee scenes so disappointing, not so much on a factual basis, but as a lapse of cultural awareness.Bruce Lee was my friend and teacher. That doesn’t give him a free pass for how he’s portrayed in movies. But it does give me some insight into the man. I first met Bruce when I was a student at UCLA looking to continue my martial arts studies, which I started in New York City. We quickly developed a friendship as well as a student-teacher relationship. He taught me the discipline and spirituality of martial arts, which was greatly responsible for me being able to play competitively in the NBA for 20 years with very few injuries.During our years of friendship, he spoke passionately about how frustrated he was with the stereotypical representation of Asians in film and TV. The only roles were for inscrutable villains or bowing servants. In Have Gun - Will Travel, Paladin’s faithful Chinese servant goes by the insulting name of “Hey Boy” (Kam Tong). He was replaced in season four by a female character referred to as “Hey Girl” (Lisa Lu). Asian men were portrayed as sexless accessories to a scene, while the women were subservient. This was how African-American men and women were generally portrayed until the advent of Sidney Poitier and blaxploitation films. Bruce was dedicated to changing the dismissive image of Asians through his acting, writing and promotion of Jeet Kune Do, his interpretation of martial arts.That’s why it disturbs me that Tarantino chose to portray Bruce in such a one-dimensional way. The John Wayne machismo attitude of Cliff (Brad Pitt), an aging stuntman who defeats the arrogant, uppity Chinese guy harks back to the very stereotypes Bruce was trying to dismantle. Of course the blond, white beefcake American can beat your fancy Asian chopsocky dude because that foreign crap doesn’t fly here.I might even go along with the skewered version of Bruce if that wasn’t the only significant scene with him, if we’d also seen a glimpse of his other traits, of his struggle to be taken seriously in Hollywood. Alas, he was just another Hey Boy prop to the scene. The scene is complicated by being presented as a flashback, but in a way that could suggest the stuntman’s memory is cartoonishly biased in his favor. Equally disturbing is the unresolved shadow that Cliff may have killed his wife with a spear gun because she nagged him. Classic Cliff. Is Cliff more heroic because he also doesn’t put up with outspoken women?I was in public with Bruce several times when some random jerk would loudly challenge Bruce to a fight. He always politely declined and moved on. First rule of Bruce’s fight club was don’t fight — unless there is no other option. He felt no need to prove himself. He knew who he was and that the real fight wasn’t on the mat, it was on the screen in creating opportunities for Asians to be seen as more than grinning stereotypes. Unfortunately, Once Upon a Time in Hollywood prefers the good old ways.

solacekames: 8:08 AM PDT 8/16/2019 by Kareem Abdul-JabbarThe NBA great and Hollywood Reporter columnist, a friend of the late martial ar...

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tiggurix: cracked: 22 Things Movies Get Completely Wrong About Mental Illness Cracked doing the Lord’s work and shedding light on ableism and inaccuracy. : on Full House, DJ gets over an eating disorder in 3 days. FEME In the real world, it can take yearsS On the very special episode "Shape Up," all it takes for DJ to quit starving herself is a chat with dad. The reality is that recovery is a difficult process that can take seven to ten years, or longer. CRACKED COM https//www.anred.com/tx.html Hollywood loves a sad, brooding love interest. Real depression Kills relationships. That sad character being portrayed as romantic would actually be really hard to have an ongoing relationship with. Being depressed can cause them to pay less attention to their partner, be less involved, be more irritable, and have trouble enjoying time together. And a failing relationship creates a cycle of deeper depression. CRACKED COM https://blogs scientificamerican.com/mind-guest-blog/ the-waming-signs-that-depression-is-affecting-your-relationship/ If a character is mentally ill, they're usually violent. That's the opposite of how it really is. Movies like Se7en, Silence Of The Lambs, and Fight Club and shows like Hannibal, Mr. Robot, and Dexter perpetuate the stereotype that people with mental illnesses are fearsome criminals, if not outright violent ones. In fact, people with mental illness are much more likely to be victims of violent crime. CRACKED GOM http://www.mentalhealth gov/basics/myths-facts in Silver Linings Playbook, love cures bipolar disorder Bipolar disorder doesn't work that way. Being in a good relationship is a positive influence on mental health, but the idea that the characters could stop taking medication and be completely mentally healthy just because they fell în love is ridiculous. CRACKED CONT http://www.vuiture.com/2012/12/ask-a-psychiatrist-how- does-silver-linings-playbook-handle-mental-ilness html tiggurix: cracked: 22 Things Movies Get Completely Wrong About Mental Illness Cracked doing the Lord’s work and shedding light on ableism and inaccuracy.

tiggurix: cracked: 22 Things Movies Get Completely Wrong About Mental Illness Cracked doing the Lord’s work and shedding light on ableism...

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jasker: AAAAHH WOW!!! LOOK AT ALL THESE WONDERFUL ASKS oh my gosh you guys! i honestly wasnt expecting such a huge response but im SO happy this is making so many other people happy!! 💕💗💖 i love these girlfriends so much *m*: TASKEK CA luciayshadow said: Anonymous said: rocketmermaid said: Your Bowsette comic is the cutest thing about her that I have read Trans lesbian Bowsette is amazing and beautiful and cute and your comic thing you did about it was amazing!! Thank you for your portrayal of Bowsette as a beefy trans lesbian, As a beefy trans girl myself, the blonde tiddy anime princess portrayal of Bowsette made me feel left out in the cold, and I love seeing women like myself portrayed as gorgeous and worthwhile. You also draw my favorite versions of Jasper, with whom I also share a deep affinity. Keep up the good work! <3 .. ... logicalman6 said: Anonymous said: Just wanted to say Thank You For Your Bowsette, she's beautiful and I hope we see her again, and maybe her hanging with Jasper. Thank You For Your Time can you draw more bowsette pleasel? And Your Art goldenevil91 said: Yeeeeeess more trans lesbian Bowsettel She and Peach are my new otp! umbretoaster said: Anonymous said: YES YES YESI WHOLEHEARTEDLY AGREE Bowsette has little chain chomp earrings I love them that's so cutell I lov her Anonymous said: like the way you draw the b e ef dawn0star said: docsyonide said: hey. hey. your bowsette comic and design gives me life and im going to be Sorry to trouble you with another message; I'm sure you're getting tired of me thinking abt it all day i think at least Anonymous said: posting: I just have to say I went and looked up what this whole Bowsette thing was and yours was my favourite; all the others are just peach in Goth but you Hot take, vour rendition of bowsette is the only valid one in all of existence :0 actually showed a design that could be extrapolated from who she was to who irpandaking said: she is now. It's wonderful. Though, admittedly, Im biased a little as she's big and I always love your big women^_ Can't wait for your next workl Take carel That's was hecking cute! ... Anonymous said: Anonymous said: Hey no offense but I would die for your trans lesbian Bowsette she so good and I loved your Bowsette comic, I wish there was more wholesome content for this trend but everywhere I look it is pom. lovely jasker: AAAAHH WOW!!! LOOK AT ALL THESE WONDERFUL ASKS oh my gosh you guys! i honestly wasnt expecting such a huge response but im SO happy this is making so many other people happy!! 💕💗💖 i love these girlfriends so much *m*
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shmemson: vernacular-manslaughter: octospider: Gwendoline Christie is the actress for Brienne of Tarth in Game of Thrones. She stands at 6 feet 3 inches tall and took swordfighting, horseriding, and stagefighting lessons for her part, as well as gaining 14 pounds of muscle, to accurately portray Brienne. (x) She was also terrified of cutting her hair because she’d spent her life believing it was one of the only things that would make people see her as feminine despite her height. In an interview with TV Guide she said: I struggled for a long time with [cutting] my hair, but then I’m grateful for the opportunity to realize that femininity doesn’t have to come from hair or any of those traditional female archetypes of appearance, So, that’s been exciting actually. I can’t speak with any kind of authority whatsoever because I’m just an actor and I only have my opinions, but I do think it’s really refreshing to have a woman depicted on a mainstream TV show that doesn’t obey typical aesthetics of females and the way they have been portrayed in the past. And I’m really excited to be portraying one of those women. And I hope that her popularity signals a greater expansion of people’s views about men and women and that gender types can be more flexible. She’s so so so so great. I think she’s just incredible. : shmemson: vernacular-manslaughter: octospider: Gwendoline Christie is the actress for Brienne of Tarth in Game of Thrones. She stands at 6 feet 3 inches tall and took swordfighting, horseriding, and stagefighting lessons for her part, as well as gaining 14 pounds of muscle, to accurately portray Brienne. (x) She was also terrified of cutting her hair because she’d spent her life believing it was one of the only things that would make people see her as feminine despite her height. In an interview with TV Guide she said: I struggled for a long time with [cutting] my hair, but then I’m grateful for the opportunity to realize that femininity doesn’t have to come from hair or any of those traditional female archetypes of appearance, So, that’s been exciting actually. I can’t speak with any kind of authority whatsoever because I’m just an actor and I only have my opinions, but I do think it’s really refreshing to have a woman depicted on a mainstream TV show that doesn’t obey typical aesthetics of females and the way they have been portrayed in the past. And I’m really excited to be portraying one of those women. And I hope that her popularity signals a greater expansion of people’s views about men and women and that gender types can be more flexible. She’s so so so so great. I think she’s just incredible.

shmemson: vernacular-manslaughter: octospider: Gwendoline Christie is the actress for Brienne of Tarth in Game of Thrones. She stands...

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youstillhateblacktranswomen: feamir: ithelpstodream: bringing this one back When I went to see Tangled with my family, I was terrified of having to talk about the movie afterwards because I related so much to Rapunzel, and I was sure my mom would hate the movie because it was so obvious that she was exactly like mother gothel. So when mom asked me afterwards if I liked it I gave a tepid non-answer. But then my mom started talking about how she loved the movie! And it slowly dawned on me that she also saw mother gothel as evil and abusive, but somehow didn’t make the connection that she and her were the same. My mom even made a comment to the effect of how, like rapunzel’s real mom, her love for me would always triumph or whatever. And she didn’t get it! She didn’t see the similarities of how she locked me away in the house, or how she kept me under the tightest supervision under the guise of keeping me safe. I spent the entire mother knows best song stealing glances at her next to me in the theater just waiting for her to drag us out of the movie because she couldn’t stand to have her “love” portrayed as evil. And she didn’t see how the fact that she created her identity completely around being a mother and nothing else was like mother gothel’s dependency on rapunzel’s magic hair. It was only after seeing her positive reaction to the movie, that I really understood the meaning of the phrase “everyone is the hero of their own story”. No one actually thinks they’re the villain, even if confronted with a painfully obvious rendering of their own actions done by someone they agree is rightly portrayed as evil. “everyone is the hero of their own story”. No one actually thinks they’re the villain, even if confronted with a painfully obvious rendering of their own actions done by someone they agree is rightly portrayed as evil. : Megan Greenwell @megreenwell after seeing 'get out' in a very white crowd, all of us cheering wildly for chris, i keep remembering this, from elif batuman's 'the idiot. recognize it and laugh. I found myself remembering the day in kindergarten whe the teachers showed us Dumbo: a Disney movie about a puny, weind looking circus elephant that everyone made fun of. As the story u- folded, I realized to my amazement that all the kids in the class, even the bullies, the ones who despised and tormented the weak and the ugly, were rooting against Dumbo's tormentors. Over and over thry laughed and cheered, both when Dumbo succeeded and when biu things happened to the bullies. But they're you, I thought to myel. How did they not know? They didn't know. It was astounding, im astounding truth. Everyone thougbt they were Dumbo. Again and again I saw the phenomenon repeated. The mosta trary and tyrannical girls, the ones who started secret clubs to ostr youstillhateblacktranswomen: feamir: ithelpstodream: bringing this one back When I went to see Tangled with my family, I was terrified of having to talk about the movie afterwards because I related so much to Rapunzel, and I was sure my mom would hate the movie because it was so obvious that she was exactly like mother gothel. So when mom asked me afterwards if I liked it I gave a tepid non-answer. But then my mom started talking about how she loved the movie! And it slowly dawned on me that she also saw mother gothel as evil and abusive, but somehow didn’t make the connection that she and her were the same. My mom even made a comment to the effect of how, like rapunzel’s real mom, her love for me would always triumph or whatever. And she didn’t get it! She didn’t see the similarities of how she locked me away in the house, or how she kept me under the tightest supervision under the guise of keeping me safe. I spent the entire mother knows best song stealing glances at her next to me in the theater just waiting for her to drag us out of the movie because she couldn’t stand to have her “love” portrayed as evil. And she didn’t see how the fact that she created her identity completely around being a mother and nothing else was like mother gothel’s dependency on rapunzel’s magic hair. It was only after seeing her positive reaction to the movie, that I really understood the meaning of the phrase “everyone is the hero of their own story”. No one actually thinks they’re the villain, even if confronted with a painfully obvious rendering of their own actions done by someone they agree is rightly portrayed as evil. “everyone is the hero of their own story”. No one actually thinks they’re the villain, even if confronted with a painfully obvious rendering of their own actions done by someone they agree is rightly portrayed as evil.

youstillhateblacktranswomen: feamir: ithelpstodream: bringing this one back When I went to see Tangled with my family, I was terrified...

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eutopianext: khaaaaaaaaaan: the-tarot-cafe: She is singing an ancient herding song from mid-north Sweden and Norway. I sense very old vibrations in the calling tones. See what happens to the cows as the singing calls.The singer is Jonna Jinton. Ohohoh, but we have SO MANY of these old songs and tunes (called “kulokk” in Norwegian). Some with lyrics, some without. Some with straight up talking and almost shouting inbetween the most enchanting melodies. They’re using every bit of their voice range to create these tunes, and it’s all based on a wonderful traditional Scaninavian way of singing (that can be a lot more characteristic than in this video, but this is beautiful as well!). In Norway up to the 1800s these amazing women (and only women) spent their summers, often all alone, in the Norwegian mountains to herd and milk cows, and let the animals roam freely. To attract them they would make up these wonderful tunes, and there is even folklore that connects these women to the huldra, which is a Scandinavian forest/mountain siren. She takes the form of a beautiful woman, often portrayed in traditional dresses that partly cover up her animal tail (in Norway a cow’s tail, in Sweden a fox’ tail) that would give away her true nature if anyone saw it. So, the tunes and their effect on animals, combined with these strong women in the beautiful landscape was just too much for people to handle, so people started fantasizing about women like these being straight up supernatural. American version no one asked for: a farmer in Kansas with a trombone. : eutopianext: khaaaaaaaaaan: the-tarot-cafe: She is singing an ancient herding song from mid-north Sweden and Norway. I sense very old vibrations in the calling tones. See what happens to the cows as the singing calls.The singer is Jonna Jinton. Ohohoh, but we have SO MANY of these old songs and tunes (called “kulokk” in Norwegian). Some with lyrics, some without. Some with straight up talking and almost shouting inbetween the most enchanting melodies. They’re using every bit of their voice range to create these tunes, and it’s all based on a wonderful traditional Scaninavian way of singing (that can be a lot more characteristic than in this video, but this is beautiful as well!). In Norway up to the 1800s these amazing women (and only women) spent their summers, often all alone, in the Norwegian mountains to herd and milk cows, and let the animals roam freely. To attract them they would make up these wonderful tunes, and there is even folklore that connects these women to the huldra, which is a Scandinavian forest/mountain siren. She takes the form of a beautiful woman, often portrayed in traditional dresses that partly cover up her animal tail (in Norway a cow’s tail, in Sweden a fox’ tail) that would give away her true nature if anyone saw it. So, the tunes and their effect on animals, combined with these strong women in the beautiful landscape was just too much for people to handle, so people started fantasizing about women like these being straight up supernatural. American version no one asked for: a farmer in Kansas with a trombone.
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youstillhateblacktranswomen: feamir: ithelpstodream: bringing this one back When I went to see Tangled with my family, I was terrified of having to talk about the movie afterwards because I related so much to Rapunzel, and I was sure my mom would hate the movie because it was so obvious that she was exactly like mother gothel. So when mom asked me afterwards if I liked it I gave a tepid non-answer. But then my mom started talking about how she loved the movie! And it slowly dawned on me that she also saw mother gothel as evil and abusive, but somehow didn’t make the connection that she and her were the same. My mom even made a comment to the effect of how, like rapunzel’s real mom, her love for me would always triumph or whatever. And she didn’t get it! She didn’t see the similarities of how she locked me away in the house, or how she kept me under the tightest supervision under the guise of keeping me safe. I spent the entire mother knows best song stealing glances at her next to me in the theater just waiting for her to drag us out of the movie because she couldn’t stand to have her “love” portrayed as evil. And she didn’t see how the fact that she created her identity completely around being a mother and nothing else was like mother gothel’s dependency on rapunzel’s magic hair. It was only after seeing her positive reaction to the movie, that I really understood the meaning of the phrase “everyone is the hero of their own story”. No one actually thinks they’re the villain, even if confronted with a painfully obvious rendering of their own actions done by someone they agree is rightly portrayed as evil. “everyone is the hero of their own story”. No one actually thinks they’re the villain, even if confronted with a painfully obvious rendering of their own actions done by someone they agree is rightly portrayed as evil. : Megan Greenwell @megreenwell after seeing 'get out' in a very white crowd, all of us cheering wildly for chris, i keep remembering this, from elif batuman's 'the idiot. recognize it and laugh. I found myself remembering the day in kindergarten whe the teachers showed us Dumbo: a Disney movie about a puny, weind looking circus elephant that everyone made fun of. As the story u- folded, I realized to my amazement that all the kids in the class, even the bullies, the ones who despised and tormented the weak and the ugly, were rooting against Dumbo's tormentors. Over and over thry laughed and cheered, both when Dumbo succeeded and when biu things happened to the bullies. But they're you, I thought to myel. How did they not know? They didn't know. It was astounding, im astounding truth. Everyone thougbt they were Dumbo. Again and again I saw the phenomenon repeated. The mosta trary and tyrannical girls, the ones who started secret clubs to ostr youstillhateblacktranswomen: feamir: ithelpstodream: bringing this one back When I went to see Tangled with my family, I was terrified of having to talk about the movie afterwards because I related so much to Rapunzel, and I was sure my mom would hate the movie because it was so obvious that she was exactly like mother gothel. So when mom asked me afterwards if I liked it I gave a tepid non-answer. But then my mom started talking about how she loved the movie! And it slowly dawned on me that she also saw mother gothel as evil and abusive, but somehow didn’t make the connection that she and her were the same. My mom even made a comment to the effect of how, like rapunzel’s real mom, her love for me would always triumph or whatever. And she didn’t get it! She didn’t see the similarities of how she locked me away in the house, or how she kept me under the tightest supervision under the guise of keeping me safe. I spent the entire mother knows best song stealing glances at her next to me in the theater just waiting for her to drag us out of the movie because she couldn’t stand to have her “love” portrayed as evil. And she didn’t see how the fact that she created her identity completely around being a mother and nothing else was like mother gothel’s dependency on rapunzel’s magic hair. It was only after seeing her positive reaction to the movie, that I really understood the meaning of the phrase “everyone is the hero of their own story”. No one actually thinks they’re the villain, even if confronted with a painfully obvious rendering of their own actions done by someone they agree is rightly portrayed as evil. “everyone is the hero of their own story”. No one actually thinks they’re the villain, even if confronted with a painfully obvious rendering of their own actions done by someone they agree is rightly portrayed as evil.

youstillhateblacktranswomen: feamir: ithelpstodream: bringing this one back When I went to see Tangled with my family, I was terrifie...

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