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Apparently, Dude, and Fucking: wha!? Sl BAPU BAPTIST CHUR(H SUS DISGUST MyCHILD Dortyouatti? SaSin!God condemns W all! BRIAN heed to have a talk 0 CHRISTIANS CELEBRATE TH ISLAMIC TEMPUE I didnt die ona Cross for this BS RADICAL righte homoSexvality ar the last 2.000 yearsold. prismatic-bell: the-spoopy-ghost-of-raejin99: prismatic-bell: broken-bits-of-dreams: prismatic-bell: aiko-mori-hates-pedos: artbymoga: Throwback to all these Jesus comics I drew in 2012… Good post OP Good post, OP, and if you ever decide to do another may I please suggest “NOT IN HEBREW IT DOESN’T” as a punchline? So much of the Old Testament is HORRIFICALLY translated from the Tanakh, it drives me batty. WAIT WAIT WHAT DOES IT SAY?????? I NEED TO LIKE,, DESTROY MI MUM FOR BEING REALLY HOMOPHOBIC Okay, so, strictly speaking, the infamous Leviticus 18:22 does say “forbidden.” Here’s the thing: 1) The word translated as “forbidden” is “toevah.” While that translation isn’t … wrong, it’s sort of like saying “McMansion” means “really big house.” There are a lot of connotations in that word. The specific issue with toevah is that we … sort of … don’t know anymore exactly what it meant. Based on context, it seems likely that the word referred to something ritually forbidden. This part of Torah was written not only as a guide for future generations, but also to say “so, look around, see your neighbors? DON’T DO THAT.“ Thus, if we interpret “toevah” to mean something that’s forbidden to do as a ritual before G-d, then the verse says nothing whatsoever about Adam and Steve and their two kids and their dog–it’s saying you shouldn’t have sex with another man in the Temple as a sacrifice. 2) Following the same “this is ritually forbidden” logic of toevah, this verse may also be interpreted as “don’t do sex magic,” which was a thing in. Like. A lot of fucking cultures at the time. 3) Hebrew is a highly gendered language, and the grammatical gender in this verse is really really weird. One of the “men” in this verse is given female grammar. Why? Who fucking knows, man, this isn’t the only grammatical oddity in Torah. (There are also places where G-d is referred to as plural, and also as female.) One suggestion is that this is a way of creating a diminutive–that is, that the verse should be read as “a man should not lie with a boy.” Now, it’s worth noting that modern secular scholarship has concluded the written Torah was written down around the 6th century BCE, and most non-Orthodox Jewish scholars are like “yeah, all things considered, that sounds pretty legit.” Do you know what else was happening around the 6th century BCE? What laypeople tend to mean when they say “ancient Greece” was happening. Do you know what happened a lot in that time period in Greece? Dudes forming relationships with younger boys, like ages 10-15, and using them for sex in exchange for financial gifts, mentorship, etc. While we don’t know just how young some of these younger boys may have been, we do know some were prepubescent. In light of this, and also something I mentioned under the first point–”see your neighbors? DON’T DO THAT,” if this verse is interpreted to say “a man should not lie with a boy,” then it’s pretty clearly “my dudes, my fellows, my lads, don’t be fucking pedophiles.” 4) Because of the grammar I mentioned in #3, it’s also possible that “should not lie with a man as with a woman” is actually referring to a place, not an abstract personhood: a man shouldn’t have sex with another man in a woman’s bed. In the time period, a woman’s bed was sort of like–that was her place, her safe sanctuary. It was also a ritually holy place where babies were made. By having sex in her bed, you’re violating her safe space (and also introducing a man who may not be a male relative, thus forcing her into breaking the laws of modesty). If this verse is read this way, then it should be taken to mean “don’t sexually violate a woman’s safety and modesty.”5) And as an offshoot of #4, this may be a second verse relating to infidelity. Which woman’s bed is any random dude in 600 BCE most likely to have access to? His wife’s. But laws were administered differently based on whether the person they pertained to was slave or free, male or female, and so on–thus, a man committing adultery with a woman would be treated differently than man committing adultery with a man (especially because the latter would carry no chance of an illegitimate pregnancy). So you’ll note, there are a lot of ways to read this verse, and only a one-to-one translation with no cultural awareness produces “being gay is wrong, all of the time”.(You’ll also notice the word “abomination” is nowhere to be found. That’s like … a straight-up fiction created for who only knows what reason.) Apparently tumblr mobile doesn’t want to show @prismatic-bell ’s long and in-depth essay, so here’s the screenshots, because it still shows up on mobile browsers: Much appreciated.
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Baby, It's Cold Outside, Christmas, and Definitely: Andrew Rannells @AndrewRannells I don't think any more people need to record Baby It's Cold Outside. I think we're good there teachingwithcoffee It's time to bring an end to the Rape Anthem Masquerading As Christmas Carol bigbutterandeggman Hi there! Former English nerd/teacher here Also a big fan of jazz of the 30s and 40s So. Here's the thing. Given a cursory glance and applying today's worldview to the song, yes, you're right, it absolutely *sounds* like a rape anthem. BUT! Let's look closer! "Hey what's in this drink" was a stock joke at the time, and the punchline was invariably that there's actually pretty much nothing in the drink, not even a significant amount of alcohol See, this woman is staying late, unchaperoned, at a dudes house. In the 1940's, that's the kind of thing Good Girls aren't supposed to do-and she wants people to think she's a good girl. The woman in the song says outright, multiple times, that what other people will think of her staying is what shes really concerned about "the neighbors might think" "my maiden aunt's mind is vicious," "there's bound to be talk tomorrow." But she's having a really good time, and she wants to stay, and so she is excusing her uncharacteristically bold behavior (either to the guy or to herself) by blaming it on the drink -unaware that the drink is actually really weak, maybe not even alcoholic at all. That's the joke That is the standard joke that's going on when a woman in media from the early-to-mid 20th century says "hey, what's in this drink?" It is not a joke about how she's drunk and about to be raped. It's a joke about how she's perfectly sober and about to have awesome consensual sex and use the drink for plausible deniability because she's living in a society where women aren't supposed to have sexual agency Basically, the song only makes sense in the context of a society in which women are expected to reject mens advances whether they actually want to or not, and therefore it's normal and expected for a lady's gentleman companion to pressure her despite her protests, because he knows she would have to say that whether or not she meant it, and if she really wants to stay she won't be able to justify doing so unless he offers her an excuse other than "I'm staying because I want to." (That's the main theme of the man's lines in the song, suggesting excuses she can use when people ask later why she spent the night at his house: it was so cold out, there were no cabs available, he simply insisted because he was concerned about my safety in such awful weather, it was perfectly innocent and definitely not about sex at all!) In this particular case, he's pretty clearly right, because the woman has a voice, and she's using it to give all the culturally-understood signals that she actually does want to stay but can't say so She states explicitly that she's resisting because shes supposed to, not because she wants to: "I ought to say no no no..." She states explicitly that she's just putting up a token resistance so she'll be able to claim later that she did whats expected of a decent woman in this situation: "at least I'm gonna say that I tried." And at the end of the song they're singing together, in harmony, because they're both on the same page and they have been all along So it's not actually a song about rape in fact it's a song about a woman finding a way to exercise sexual agency in a patriarchal society designed to stop her from doing so. But it's also, at the same time, one of the best illustrations of rape culture that pop culture has ever produced. It's a song about a society where women aren't allowed to say yes..which happens to mean it's also a society where women don't have a clear and unambiguous way to say no Source: matchingvnecks #baby it's cold outside #not about rape #so tired of having to explain this on 238,267 notes Dec 3rd, 2016 Its that time of year again
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Baby, It's Cold Outside, Christmas, and Definitely: I don't think any more people need to record Baby It's Cold Outside. I think we're good there teachingwithcoffee It's time to bring an end to the Rape Anthem Masquerading As Christmas Caral bigbutterandeggman Hi there! Former English nerd/teacher here. Also a big fan of jazz of the 30s and 40s So. Here's the thing. Given a cursory glance and applying today's worldview to the song. yes, you're right, it absolutely 'sounds' like a rape anthem. BUTI Let's look closerl "Hey what's in this drink" was a stock joke at the time, and the punchline was invariably that there's actually pretty much nothing in the drink, not even a significant amount of alcohol. See, this woman is staying late, unchaperoned at a dude's house. In the 1940's, that's the kind of thing Good Girls aren't supposed to do - and she wants people to think she's a good girl. The woman in the song says outright, multiple times, that what other people will think of her staying is what she's really concerned about: the neighbors might think," "my maiden aunt's mind is vicious," "there's bound to be talk tomorrow." But she's having a really good time and she wants to stay, and so she is excusing her uncharacteristically bold behavior (either to the guy or to herself) by blaming it on the drink - unaware that the drink is actually really weak maybe not even alcoholic at all. That's the joke. That is the standard joke that's going on when a woman in media from the early-to-mid 20th century says "hey, what's in this drink?" It is not a joke about how she's drunk and about to be raped. It's a joke about how she's perfectly sober and about to have awesome consensual sex and use the drink for plausible deniability because she's living in a society where women aren't supposed to have sexual agency Basically, the song only makes sense in the ext of a society in which women are expected to reject men's advances whether they actually want to or not, and therefore it's normal and expected for a lady's gentleman companion to pressure her despite her protests because he knows she would have to say that whether or not she meant it, and if she really wants to stay she won't be able to justify doing so unless he offers her an excuse other than "I'm staying because I want to." (That's the main theme of the man's lines in the song suggesting excuses she can use when people ask later why she spent the night at his house: it was so cold out, there were no cabs available, he simply insisted because he was concerned about my safety in such awful weather, it was perfectly innocent and definitely not about sex at all!) In this particular case, he's pretty clearly right, because the woman has a voice, and she's using it to give all the culturally- understood signals that she actually does want to stay but can't say so. She states explicitly that she's resisting because she's supposed to, not because she wants to: "l ought to say no no no..." She states explicitly that she's just putting up a token resistance so she'll be able to claim later that she did what's expected of a decent woman in this situation: "at least I'm oonna sav that I tried. And at the end of the that she's resisting because she's supposed to not because she wants to: "l ought to say no no no..." She states explicitly that she's just putting up a token resistance so she' ll be able to claim later that she did what's expected of a decent woman in this situation: "at least I'm gonna say thatI tried." And at the end of the song they're singing together, in harmony because they're both on the same page and they have been all along. So it's not actually a song about rape in fact it's a song about a woman finding a way to exercise sexual agency in a patriarchal society designed to stop her from doing so. But it's also, at the same time, one of the best llustrations of rape culture that pop culture has ever produced. It's a song about a society where women aren't allowed to say yes...which happens to mean it's also a society where women don't have a clear and unambiguous way to say no. Source:matchinovnecks #baby it's cold outside #not about rape #30 tired of having to explain this one 196,155 notes "C But Baby It’s Cold
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Baseball, Carrie Fisher, and Complex: <p><a href="https://jackofallwhatsnew.tumblr.com/post/175181801577/an-average-sized-person-ineedfeminismbecuz" class="tumblr_blog">jackofallwhatsnew</a>:</p> <blockquote><p><a href="https://an-average-sized-person.tumblr.com/post/175180661577/ineedfeminismbecuz-an-average-sized-person" class="tumblr_blog">an-average-sized-person</a>:</p><blockquote> <p><a href="http://ineedfeminismbecuz.tumblr.com/post/175175790460/an-average-sized-person-celticpyro" class="tumblr_blog">ineedfeminismbecuz</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="https://an-average-sized-person.tumblr.com/post/175175012287/celticpyro-devil-may-cry-baby" class="tumblr_blog">an-average-sized-person</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="http://celticpyro.tumblr.com/post/175174833629/devil-may-cry-baby-an-average-sized-person" class="tumblr_blog">celticpyro</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="http://devil-may-cry-baby.tumblr.com/post/175168215330/an-average-sized-person-fullmetal-fabulous" class="tumblr_blog">devil-may-cry-baby</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="https://an-average-sized-person.tumblr.com/post/175167710562/fullmetal-fabulous-sleepyyseraph" class="tumblr_blog">an-average-sized-person</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="http://fullmetal-fabulous.tumblr.com/post/174915311987/sleepyyseraph-adamneilcallaby-oarv-going" class="tumblr_blog">fullmetal-fabulous</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="http://sleepyyseraph.tumblr.com/post/165253576641/adamneilcallaby-oarv-going-through-day-after" class="tumblr_blog">sleepyyseraph</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="http://adamneilcallaby.tumblr.com/post/162640635063" class="tumblr_blog">adamneilcallaby</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="http://oarv.tumblr.com/post/157964421887/going-through-day-after-day-of-excruciating-work" class="tumblr_blog">oarv</a>:</p> <blockquote><p>“Going through day after day of excruciating work was almost unbearable. Jack Nicholson’s character had to be crazy and angry all the time. And in my character I had to cry 12 hours a day, all day long, the last nine months straight, five or six days a week. I was there a year and a month, and there must be something to Primal Scream therapy, because after the day was over and I’d cried for my 12 hours … After all that work, hardly anyone even criticized my performance in it, even to mention it, it seemed like. The reviews were all about Kubrick, like I wasn’t there.” - Shelly Duvall, December 1980</p></blockquote> <p>To give a little more perspective on just how horrific this film was, I need to give people some information:</p> <p>Since retiring from acting in 2002, Shelley Duvall has lived a reclusive and isolated life. However, in November of 2016, <i><b>USA Today</b></i> reported that she appeared to be suffering from mental illness. And then later that month, to an incredible amount of hype, Shelley appeared on the <i><b>Dr. Phil</b></i> show where she basically looked unrecognisable, seemed delusional and talked about people trying to kill her. The episode basically confirmed there rumours.<br/></p> <p>You can find videos/clips of the interview on youtube, however I won’t link it because it’s upsetting and disrespectful.</p> <p>After the interview aired, Vivian Kubrick, daughter of <i><b>The Shining</b></i> director Stanley Kubrick, described the interview as “exploitative entertainment” and “appallingly cruel”. The show then received a lot of backlash (rightly so) and a number of other chat shows started discussing it (again, there’s some videos of these on youtube)</p> <p>Now, how does this all connect to <b>The Shining, </b>you ask? To quote Wikipedia:</p> <p>“Jack Nicholson states in the documentary <i><b>Stanley Kubrick: A Life in Pictures</b></i>, that Kubrick was great to work with but that he was “<i>a different director</i>” with Duvall. Because of Kubrick’s methodical nature, principal photography took a <i>year</i> to complete. Kubrick and Duvall <i>argued frequently</i>, although Duvall later said she learned more from working with Kubrick on <i>The Shining</i> than she did on all her earlier films. In order to give <i>The Shining</i> the psychological horror it needed, director Stanley Kubrick <i>antagonised his actors.</i> The film’s script was changed so often that Nicholson stopped reading each draft. Kubrick <i><b>intentionally isolated Duvall and argued with her often.</b></i> Duvall was <i><b>forced to perform the iconic and exhausting baseball bat scene 127 times</b></i>. Afterwards, Duvall presented Kubrick with <i><b>clumps of hair that had fallen out due to the extreme stress of filming</b></i>.”</p> <p>One year of solid filming. She had to cry, panic and be scared for 12 hours a day, seven days a week, nine months straight. She was isolated and antagonised by the director. She had to perform the baseball bat scene 127 times in a row (that’s her crying and screaming, and Jack Nicholson being hit) And to top it all of, Jack and Kubrick get all the attention while she gets ignored?</p> <p>From my own personal experience of mental illness, being exposed to feelings of fear and distress for prolonged periods of time can cause the brain to learn and expect it. I’m not saying that filming <i>The Shining</i> caused Shelley Duvall to develop mental illness, I am <i><b>stating</b></i> that whether the movie brought out an existing condition, or prepared the bed for something to eventually develop, filming <i>The Shining</i> has a direct correlation with Shelley Duvall suffering from mental illness.</p> <p>Next time you watch the movie, bare that in mind. It’s much sadder.</p> <p><i>Side note: Three years prior to filming, her partner of two years, Paul Simon, walked off with her friend <b>Carrie Fisher</b>, after she introduced the two. So there’s that too.</i></p> </blockquote> <p>Far too many directors love/loved tormenting their lead actresses. Hitchcock, Lars von Trier, David O. Russell, Bertolucci, Abdellatif Kechiche, and many more. What’s especially insulting to Duvall is that not only was she subjected to this treatment, but her performance has been largely unappreciated and even often ridiculed. </p> </blockquote> <p>This is why any time people say what a ~masterpiece~ the shining is I have to roll my eyes. It’s especially frustrating when the convo is “lol yeah kubrik was the worst, but made a really good movie.” No, kubrik was awful, it’s awful and it’s shameful to celebrate that, period.</p> </blockquote> <p>(Not so) Fun fact: Stanley Kubrick was a far-right social darwinist who considered democracy “a noble failure”. It shows.</p> </blockquote> <p>Another fun fact: Stephen King HATES Kubrick’s The Shining because of how it portrayed Shelley’s character. He has said that Kubrick’s version made her into a sexist stereotype and not at all like the woman he wrote in his novel.</p> </blockquote> <p style="">God that’s awful.</p> <p>And you know, maybe people didn’t like her performance because she just looked like a wreck constantly, so Kubrick’s “method acting” actually made it worse. <br/></p> </blockquote> <p class="npf_quote" data-npf='{"subtype":"quote"}'>And you somehow have the fucking idiocy to be an anti-feminist?</p> </blockquote> <p>My dude, this has fuck all to do with feminism. Especially third wave feminism.</p> </blockquote> <p class="npf_quote" data-npf='{"subtype":"quote"}'>It has literally everything to do with feminism. Patriarchal society let Kubrick get away with it because he was a Genius™ and turned Shelley Duvall into a punchline.</p> </blockquote> <p>Female actors aren’t the only people who have awful experiences. Male actors have been abused as well and been documented many of times.(<a href="http://madamenoire.com/492931/men-who-were-sexually-assaulted/">x</a>)(<a href="https://screenrant.com/times-actors-were-completely-abused-on-movie-sets/">x</a>) Actors in general has had a history of abuse with their directors, from horrible treatments to sexual abuse for both male and female. Kubrick has abused his male actors too, but of course didn’t know that in our patriarchal society no didn’t you. This has nothing to do with feminism but directors being dicks to their actors for their personal gain or for their art. Get over yourself.</p></blockquote> <p>Directors being cruel megalomaniacs with a God complex is nothing new and certainly not exclusive to female actresses.</p><p>Also</p><p class="npf_quote" data-npf='{"subtype":"quote"}'>Saying everything like this</p><p>doesn’t make your point any stronger <a class="tumblelog" href="https://tmblr.co/mWk_Fago5SyKpyXk-KOUmbw">@an-average-sized-person</a> </p>
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Ass, Beautiful, and Belgium: Ivan Throne @DarkTriadMan This is called "art". This is the legacy and heritage of the West This is what men of the West fight, sacrifice and die for This is victory #DeusVult Rollo Tomassi @RationalMale 2d Is there an example of a female sculptor who committed herself to the same level of detail that a male does with a woman? RM Ivan Throne @DarkTriadMan 2d None that come to mind. That sculpture is an act of worship before Heaven, and it shows. 6 ti 2 12 Platonic Solid Snake @Pliny_theElder Replying to @DarkTriadMan @RationalMale and 6 others the sculptor is a chinese woman you dork ass losers 2:13 PM 17 Oct 17 scotsdragon: cydonianmystery: asymbina: smitethepatriarchy: chronicallyrandom: gehayi: radgoblin: rita-repulsar: lord-kitschener: swagintherain: setup and punchline The artist is luo li rong The statue doesn’t have big enough titties to have been made by a man. I know I’ve reblogged this before but the schadenfreude is too delicious. By the way, the statue is called  La mélodie oubliée (The Forgotten Melody). Luo Li Rong also painted it: And here she and the statue are in a more formal setting (museum or art show, I can’t tell): Omg. This is just beautiful The statue is incredible but honestly has nothing on Luo Li Rong in that bow tie, damn. Random white dude: “look at what white men can do and literally nobody else can!” [cites the work of a not remotely heterosexual hot butch Chinese woman living in Belgium] I’ve reblogged this before, but the finished product is so pretty. :D This will never not be hilarious, and that statue will never not be amazing work.
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Batman, Fantastic Four, and Fucking: Colin Mochrie @colinmochrie Follow Why the shock that a woman can direct a great superhero film. After Fantastic Four, Steel, Batman vs Superman etc, it's shocking a man can RETWEETS LIKES 697 1,946 6:58 AM - 4 Jun 2017 from Brampton, Ontario 21 697 hellenhighwater: murdockmoogle: optimysticals: biteypyrotiger: systlin: love-order-chaos-repeat: Damn he came for their lives 😂 Holy shit I just witnessed Colin murder the entire movie industry.  I just saw a new episode of Who’s Line is it Anyway? in which other cast members made a transphobic joke where the punchline was “that woman has a penis.” Colin, who has a trans daughter, stood there and just repeatedly said “Really?” Until they apologized and redid their joke. Very small thing, but I appreciate the man. Colin is sunshine. And to think, I didn’t believe Colin Mochrie could earn more respect from me. You have to understand. Improv comedy has rules you follow. And rule number one, the Golden Rule: NEVER CONTRADICT. You never take what someone suggests and say “no, not that, this instead!” You never reply to a joke with “No, I don’t want to do that!” You roll with it. You ALWAYS roll with it. The ridiculousness added on top of ridiculousness peaks into a primo superdense ball of hilarity incarnate. And his reply to something offensive was “Nope. Stop the bit. Nope. Nope. Nope. You fucked up.” I’ll bet you money Wayne Brady would do the same if a white person on the show dropped an N-Bomb, and people would be understanding. Colin stood up for an oft-maligned group, whose members include one very personal to him, and completely ground that show to a grinding halt by saying “No. That’s not fucking funny.” and ruined the joke. This is a man who builds his entire career off of making jokes, and he /ruined another’s/. I’m sorry, Colin isn’t just a god amongst improv comics. He’s not just funny as all get-out and witty as hell. He’s a stone-cold badass, and he deserves recognition. Props, Mr. Mochrie. You, sir, are deserving of respect. I’ve worked with him (just briefly) and can confirm: he is just as excellent in real life as he seems here. 
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