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larndraws: I was asked how I made the rainbow light effect in my last piece, so I put together a quick step by step.: Step one: Make a line (it can be a bit messy). X Motion Blun Cancel Preview 100% Angle: 46 Pixels Distance: 243 Step two: Add motion blur to line. Step three: Lock layer and paint in a rainbow with a soft brush. Keep the colours light! Step four: Duplicate layer and offset slightly. Layer Style Blending Options General Blending Styles OK Blending Options Blend Mode: Normal Cancel Opacity: Bevel & Emboss New Style... Advanced Blending Contour Fill Opacib Channels: Preview Texture G B R + Stroke Inner Shadow Blend Interior Effects Blend Clipped Layers Transparency Shapes Layer s Group Group Inner Glow Layer Mask Hides Effects Satin Vector Mask Hides Effects Color Overlay + Blend If Gray Gradient Overlay This Layer: 255 Pattern Overlay Top Layer OOuter Glow Underlying Layer: 255 Drop Shadow Layer Style Blending Options General Blending Styles OK Normal Blending Options Blend Mode: Cancel Opacity: Bevel & Emboss New Style... Advanced Blending Contour Fill 100 Preview Texture G B Channels: R Bottom Layer Knockout: None Inner Shadow Blend Interior Effects Blend Clipped Layers Transparency Shapes Layer Layer Mask Hides Effects + s Group Group Inner Glow Satin Vector Mask Hides Effects Color Overlay + Blend If Gradient Overlay + This Layer: 255 Pattern Overlay Outer Glow Underlying Layer: 255 Drop Shadow fx Step five: Open layer style menu and check off the channels as shown. (double click on the layer) Step six: Repeat! If you want to make it a bit brighter, try painting layer set to Overlay with a light colour. over it in a new larndraws: I was asked how I made the rainbow light effect in my last piece, so I put together a quick step by step.

larndraws: I was asked how I made the rainbow light effect in my last piece, so I put together a quick step by step.

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avintagekiss24: elinimate: sursumursa: gendervilleusa: marguerite26: kk-maker: 2spoopy5you: lohelim: winterthirst: sabacc: Steve Rogers did, in fact, realize that something was off when he saw the outline of the woman’s odd bra (a push-up bra, he would later learn), but being an officer and a gentleman, he said that it was the game that gave the future away. #EXCUSE ME MA’AM BUT YOUR TITTIES ARE NOT CONES I’M CALLING BULLSHIT (via) No, see, this scene is just amazing. The costume department deserves so many kudos for this, it’s unreal, especially given the fact that they pulled off Peggy pretty much flawlessly. 1) Her hair is completely wrong for the 40’s. No professional/working woman  would have her hair loose like that. Since they’re trying to pass this off as a military hospital, Steve would know that she would at least have her hair carefully pulled back, if maybe not in the elaborate coiffures that would have been popular. 2) Her tie? Too wide, too long. That’s a man’s tie, not a woman’s. They did, however, get the knot correct as far as I can see - that looks like a Windsor. 3) That. Bra. There is so much clashing between that bra and what Steve would expect (remember, he worked with a bunch of women for a long time) that it has to be intentional. She’s wearing a foam cup, which would have been unheard of back then. It’s also an exceptionally old or ill-fitting bra - why else can you see the tops of the cups? No woman would have been caught dead with misbehaving lingerie like that back then, and the soft satin cups of 40’s lingerie made it nearly impossible anyway. Her breasts are also sitting at a much lower angle than would be acceptable in the 40’s. Look at his eyes. He knows by the time he gets to her hair that something is very, very wrong. so what you are saying is S.H.E.I.L.D. has a super shitty costume division…. Nope, Nick Fury totally did this on purpose. There’s no knowing what kind of condition Steve’s in, or what kind of person he really is, after decades of nostalgia blur the reality and the long years in the ice (after a plane crash and a shitload of radiation) do their work. (Pre-crash Steve is in lots of files, I’m sure. Nick Fury does not trust files.) So Fury instructs his people to build a stage, and makes sure that the right people put up some of the wrong cues. Maybe the real Steve’s a dick, or just an above-average jock; maybe he had a knack for hanging out with real talent. Maybe he hit his head too hard on the landing and he’s not gonna be Captain anymore. On the flipside, if he really is smart, then putting him in a standard, modern hospital room and telling him the truth is going to have him clamming up and refusing to believe a goddamn thing he hears for a really long time. The real question here is, how long it does it take for the man, the myth, the legend to notice? What does he do about it? How long does he wait to get his bearings, confirm his suspicions, and gather information before attempting busting out? Turns out the answer’s about forty-five seconds. Sometimes clever posts die a quiet death in the abyss of the unreblogged. Some clever posts get attention, get comments, get better. Then there’s this one which I’ve watched evolve into a thing of brilliance. #his little jaw twitch well done chris ( @thewomaninthetanjacket ) Oh shit I hadn’t noticed that, god this just gets better and better. I love everything about this. @greenbergsays I didn’t even notice any of this until read this thread. Woah. : avintagekiss24: elinimate: sursumursa: gendervilleusa: marguerite26: kk-maker: 2spoopy5you: lohelim: winterthirst: sabacc: Steve Rogers did, in fact, realize that something was off when he saw the outline of the woman’s odd bra (a push-up bra, he would later learn), but being an officer and a gentleman, he said that it was the game that gave the future away. #EXCUSE ME MA’AM BUT YOUR TITTIES ARE NOT CONES I’M CALLING BULLSHIT (via) No, see, this scene is just amazing. The costume department deserves so many kudos for this, it’s unreal, especially given the fact that they pulled off Peggy pretty much flawlessly. 1) Her hair is completely wrong for the 40’s. No professional/working woman  would have her hair loose like that. Since they’re trying to pass this off as a military hospital, Steve would know that she would at least have her hair carefully pulled back, if maybe not in the elaborate coiffures that would have been popular. 2) Her tie? Too wide, too long. That’s a man’s tie, not a woman’s. They did, however, get the knot correct as far as I can see - that looks like a Windsor. 3) That. Bra. There is so much clashing between that bra and what Steve would expect (remember, he worked with a bunch of women for a long time) that it has to be intentional. She’s wearing a foam cup, which would have been unheard of back then. It’s also an exceptionally old or ill-fitting bra - why else can you see the tops of the cups? No woman would have been caught dead with misbehaving lingerie like that back then, and the soft satin cups of 40’s lingerie made it nearly impossible anyway. Her breasts are also sitting at a much lower angle than would be acceptable in the 40’s. Look at his eyes. He knows by the time he gets to her hair that something is very, very wrong. so what you are saying is S.H.E.I.L.D. has a super shitty costume division…. Nope, Nick Fury totally did this on purpose. There’s no knowing what kind of condition Steve’s in, or what kind of person he really is, after decades of nostalgia blur the reality and the long years in the ice (after a plane crash and a shitload of radiation) do their work. (Pre-crash Steve is in lots of files, I’m sure. Nick Fury does not trust files.) So Fury instructs his people to build a stage, and makes sure that the right people put up some of the wrong cues. Maybe the real Steve’s a dick, or just an above-average jock; maybe he had a knack for hanging out with real talent. Maybe he hit his head too hard on the landing and he’s not gonna be Captain anymore. On the flipside, if he really is smart, then putting him in a standard, modern hospital room and telling him the truth is going to have him clamming up and refusing to believe a goddamn thing he hears for a really long time. The real question here is, how long it does it take for the man, the myth, the legend to notice? What does he do about it? How long does he wait to get his bearings, confirm his suspicions, and gather information before attempting busting out? Turns out the answer’s about forty-five seconds. Sometimes clever posts die a quiet death in the abyss of the unreblogged. Some clever posts get attention, get comments, get better. Then there’s this one which I’ve watched evolve into a thing of brilliance. #his little jaw twitch well done chris ( @thewomaninthetanjacket ) Oh shit I hadn’t noticed that, god this just gets better and better. I love everything about this. @greenbergsays I didn’t even notice any of this until read this thread. Woah.
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Ballerific Fashion: Toya Wright Wearing BCBG Kourtney Color-Blocked Top and Tom Ford’s Paneled Sandals -blogged by @peachkyss ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Over the weekend, the expecting ToyaWright was spotted out and about in Atlanta with such a mommy glow. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Wright showed off her baby bump looking fall ready in BCBG’s $158 Kourtney Color-Blocked Top paired with TomFord’s $1,490 Paneled Sandals. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The bold horizontal color-blocking and dramatic wrist-ties accentuate this long-sleeve, bateau neckline top. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The Tom Ford sandals added the perfect touch to the top. The sandals are constructed from smooth black leather with claret velvet straps and a copper satin block heel. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Are we feeling Toya Wright’s fall look? BallerificFashion: Ballerific Fashion: Toya Wright Wearing BCBG Kourtney Color-Blocked Top and Tom Ford's Paneled Sandals @balleralert Ballerific Fashion: Toya Wright Wearing BCBG Kourtney Color-Blocked Top and Tom Ford’s Paneled Sandals -blogged by @peachkyss ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Over the weekend, the expecting ToyaWright was spotted out and about in Atlanta with such a mommy glow. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Wright showed off her baby bump looking fall ready in BCBG’s $158 Kourtney Color-Blocked Top paired with TomFord’s $1,490 Paneled Sandals. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The bold horizontal color-blocking and dramatic wrist-ties accentuate this long-sleeve, bateau neckline top. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The Tom Ford sandals added the perfect touch to the top. The sandals are constructed from smooth black leather with claret velvet straps and a copper satin block heel. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Are we feeling Toya Wright’s fall look? BallerificFashion

Ballerific Fashion: Toya Wright Wearing BCBG Kourtney Color-Blocked Top and Tom Ford’s Paneled Sandals -blogged by @peachkyss ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀...

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Textile history: The Ionian Chiton. The Dorian Chiton. Costume. Chitons Marjorie & C. H. B.Quennell, Everyday Things in Archaic Greece (London: B. T Batsford, 1931) killerchickadee Wait, wait.. Is that seriously ? How their clothes go? yeah hey whats up bout to put some fucking giant sheets on my body childrentalking lets bring back sheetwares ardatli When you're carding, spinning and weaving everything from scratch, using the big squares exactly as they come off the loom must seem like a fucking brillant idea. 90% (or more) of pre-14th century clothing is made purely on squares (and sometimes triangles cut from squares) annathecrow How did they get the fabric so fine it draped like that? Was that something medieval europe forgot? Or do I just have a completely misguided image of historical clothing? ardati Medieval Europe also had incredibly fine weaves, though the ancient world tended to have them beat. Linen was found in Egypt woven with a fineness that we're still trying to replicate, and there was a kind of cotton woven in India caled woven wind that was supposedly stil translucent at eight layers, and wool shawls so fine that the entire thing could be drawn through a wedding nng The way they could get away with pinking and slashing doublets in the 16th century was partially because the fabrics were so tightly woven that you could simply cut a line on the bias and nothing would fray Modern fabric machining sucks ass in terms of giving us any kind of quality like the kind human beings produced prior to the Industrial Revolution yells about textile history* Reblogging because its fascinating uidu-regani The Celts made very fine clothing as well. They invented plaid after al, and the same weaves that have been found at the La Tene/Halstatt salt mines in Austria were also found as far away as westem China in the tombs of the Tarim mummies Can we talk about 18th century and regency era musin as well because that shit is gorgeous. It's so fine it's more transparent than silk chiffon and oh the tiny hems you can make with n I have an 18th century neckerchief and the hem is about 2mm wide. Not kidding, 2mmll Because it didn't fray lke our stuff does now. All we can produce nowadays is a rough, scratchy, bullshit excuse for muslin and it's horrid bmwiid I love this because we've gotten so blind to what makes 'good fabric now machine lace? horrible scratchy shit mostly made from poly. Actual lace is handmade, lasts for fucking EVER and looks stunning. Regency gowns fucking rocked in terms of fabric quality- we use muslin as a throw away' before sewing the real fabric, back then it WAS a real fabric and it was so finely made you wouldn t even think it was the same stuff Hand hemming is still the best way to finish off anything, but harder than hell because of the shitty weave of modern fabrics. Satin? Silks?I Pah. Yes, fabric is cheaper, more affordable and varied than before, but it is an area where QUALITY was sacrificed for QUANTITY (I don't want to seem like I'm shitting on how great we have it now for clothes and martials or anything, because YAYll but also, I'd love to get my mits on a bolt of real Muslin) archaeologists recently found some Bronze Age fabric woven on site and preserved in marsh in England. it's fine to die for. they were exporting it and trading into Asia. Textile history
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Madonna Blocks Sale Of Tupac Prison Letter - blogged by: @eleven8 ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Do you remember the letter Tupac wrote in prison, revealing that he had broken up with Madonna because she was white and bad for his image? Well, it appears it won’t be going up for auction after all. A judge has blocked the sale of 22 items that Madonna has deemed as “extremely private and personally sensitive.” Of those items are previously worn satin underwear and the letter TupacShakur wrote to her from jail. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Photos, a checkbook, a hairbrush, unreleased recordings and other items were also placed up for auction. They are listed as having been put on sale by Darlene Lutz, Madonna’s “art consultant” and “a longtime personal friend of Madonna’s from her innermost circle, knowing her for over 20 years,” according to the description she provided. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Madonna says that Lutz had regular access to her home at one point. She says that Lutz helped her move, but she never gifted or sold any of her belongings to her. In her court filing, Madonna says she is “suffering irreparable harm” due to the “unauthorized display, disclosure and dissemination of highly personal information, including her, her friend’s and former boyfriends’ confidential mental thoughts and impressions.” ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ 56 of the 128 items from Madonna’s personal collection still remain up for auction.: Madonna Blocks Sale Of Tupac Prison Letter @balleralert 1 Madonna Blocks Sale Of Tupac Prison Letter - blogged by: @eleven8 ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Do you remember the letter Tupac wrote in prison, revealing that he had broken up with Madonna because she was white and bad for his image? Well, it appears it won’t be going up for auction after all. A judge has blocked the sale of 22 items that Madonna has deemed as “extremely private and personally sensitive.” Of those items are previously worn satin underwear and the letter TupacShakur wrote to her from jail. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Photos, a checkbook, a hairbrush, unreleased recordings and other items were also placed up for auction. They are listed as having been put on sale by Darlene Lutz, Madonna’s “art consultant” and “a longtime personal friend of Madonna’s from her innermost circle, knowing her for over 20 years,” according to the description she provided. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Madonna says that Lutz had regular access to her home at one point. She says that Lutz helped her move, but she never gifted or sold any of her belongings to her. In her court filing, Madonna says she is “suffering irreparable harm” due to the “unauthorized display, disclosure and dissemination of highly personal information, including her, her friend’s and former boyfriends’ confidential mental thoughts and impressions.” ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ 56 of the 128 items from Madonna’s personal collection still remain up for auction.

Madonna Blocks Sale Of Tupac Prison Letter - blogged by: @eleven8 ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Do you remember the letter Tupac wrote in prison, r...

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bramblepatch: countlessscreamingargonauts: scarimor: bmwiid: woodsmokeandwords: uidu-regani: tardygrading: spazzbot: ardatli: annathecrow: ardatli: childrentalking: itwashotwestayedinthewater: fabledquill: killerchickadee: intheheatherbright: intheheatherbright: Costume. Chitons. Marjorie C. H. B.Quennell, Everyday Things in Archaic Greece (London: B. T. Batsford, 1931). Wait, wait…. Is that seriously it? How their clothes go? that genuinely is it yeah hey whats up bout to put some fucking giant sheets on my body lets bring back sheetwares When you’re carding, spinning and weaving everything from scratch, using the big squares exactly as they come off the loom must seem like a fucking brilliant idea. 90% (or more) of pre-14th century clothing is made purely on squares (and sometimes triangles cut from squares).  How did they get the fabric so fine it draped like that? Was that something medieval europe forgot? Or do I just have a completely misguided image of historical clothing? Medieval Europe also had incredibly fine weaves, though the ancient world tended to have them beat. Linen was found in Egypt woven with a fineness that we’re still trying to replicate, and there was a kind of cotton woven in India called ‘woven wind’ that was supposedly still translucent at eight layers, and wool shawls so fine that the entire thing could be drawn through a wedding ring.  The way they could get away with pinking and slashing doublets in the 16th century was partially because the fabrics were so tightly woven that you could simply cut a line on the bias and nothing would fray.  Modern fabric machining sucks ass in terms of giving us any kind of quality like the kind human beings produced prior to the Industrial Revolution.  *yells about textile history* Reblogging because it’s fascinating. The Celts made very fine clothing as well. They invented plaid after all, and the same weaves that have been found at the La Tene/Halstatt salt mines in Austria were also found as far away as western China in the tombs of the Tarim mummies. Can we talk about 18th century and regency era muslin as well because that shit is gorgeous. It’s so fine it’s more transparent than silk chiffon and oh the tiny hems you can make with it!! I have an 18th century neckerchief and the hem is about 2mm wide. Not kidding, 2mm!!! Because it didn’t fray like our stuff does now. All we can produce nowadays is a rough, scratchy, bullshit excuse for muslin and it’s horrid. I love this because we’ve gotten so blind to what makes ‘good’ fabric now - machine lace? horrible scratchy shit mostly made from poly. Actual lace is handmade, lasts for fucking EVER and looks stunning.  Regency gowns fucking rocked in terms of fabric quality - we use muslin as a ‘throw away’ before sewing the real fabric, back then it WAS a real fabric and it was so finely made you wouldn’t even think it was the same stuff.  Hand hemming is still the best way to finish off anything, but harder than hell because of the shitty weave of modern fabrics.  Satin? Silks?! Pah. Yes, fabric is cheaper, more affordable and varied than before, but it is an area where QUALITY was sacrificed for QUANTITY.  (I don’t want to seem like I’m shitting on how great we have it now for clothes and martials or anything, because YAY!! but also, I’d love to get my mits on a bolt of real Muslin)  archaeologists recently found some Bronze Age fabric woven on site and preserved in marsh in England. it’s fine to die for. they were exporting it and trading into Asia. I’m not into fashion, but I love reading about the history and evolution of it. My favorite textile history fact is that the ancient Romans loved really sheer, floaty silks, but at the time the fashion in China, where the silk was produced, was for heavy, intricate brocades. So the Romans would import the heavier fabrics, painstakingly unravel them, and use the silk thread to weave the fabric they liked. : The Ionian Chiton The Dorian Chiton. bramblepatch: countlessscreamingargonauts: scarimor: bmwiid: woodsmokeandwords: uidu-regani: tardygrading: spazzbot: ardatli: annathecrow: ardatli: childrentalking: itwashotwestayedinthewater: fabledquill: killerchickadee: intheheatherbright: intheheatherbright: Costume. Chitons. Marjorie C. H. B.Quennell, Everyday Things in Archaic Greece (London: B. T. Batsford, 1931). Wait, wait…. Is that seriously it? How their clothes go? that genuinely is it yeah hey whats up bout to put some fucking giant sheets on my body lets bring back sheetwares When you’re carding, spinning and weaving everything from scratch, using the big squares exactly as they come off the loom must seem like a fucking brilliant idea. 90% (or more) of pre-14th century clothing is made purely on squares (and sometimes triangles cut from squares).  How did they get the fabric so fine it draped like that? Was that something medieval europe forgot? Or do I just have a completely misguided image of historical clothing? Medieval Europe also had incredibly fine weaves, though the ancient world tended to have them beat. Linen was found in Egypt woven with a fineness that we’re still trying to replicate, and there was a kind of cotton woven in India called ‘woven wind’ that was supposedly still translucent at eight layers, and wool shawls so fine that the entire thing could be drawn through a wedding ring.  The way they could get away with pinking and slashing doublets in the 16th century was partially because the fabrics were so tightly woven that you could simply cut a line on the bias and nothing would fray.  Modern fabric machining sucks ass in terms of giving us any kind of quality like the kind human beings produced prior to the Industrial Revolution.  *yells about textile history* Reblogging because it’s fascinating. The Celts made very fine clothing as well. They invented plaid after all, and the same weaves that have been found at the La Tene/Halstatt salt mines in Austria were also found as far away as western China in the tombs of the Tarim mummies. Can we talk about 18th century and regency era muslin as well because that shit is gorgeous. It’s so fine it’s more transparent than silk chiffon and oh the tiny hems you can make with it!! I have an 18th century neckerchief and the hem is about 2mm wide. Not kidding, 2mm!!! Because it didn’t fray like our stuff does now. All we can produce nowadays is a rough, scratchy, bullshit excuse for muslin and it’s horrid. I love this because we’ve gotten so blind to what makes ‘good’ fabric now - machine lace? horrible scratchy shit mostly made from poly. Actual lace is handmade, lasts for fucking EVER and looks stunning.  Regency gowns fucking rocked in terms of fabric quality - we use muslin as a ‘throw away’ before sewing the real fabric, back then it WAS a real fabric and it was so finely made you wouldn’t even think it was the same stuff.  Hand hemming is still the best way to finish off anything, but harder than hell because of the shitty weave of modern fabrics.  Satin? Silks?! Pah. Yes, fabric is cheaper, more affordable and varied than before, but it is an area where QUALITY was sacrificed for QUANTITY.  (I don’t want to seem like I’m shitting on how great we have it now for clothes and martials or anything, because YAY!! but also, I’d love to get my mits on a bolt of real Muslin)  archaeologists recently found some Bronze Age fabric woven on site and preserved in marsh in England. it’s fine to die for. they were exporting it and trading into Asia. I’m not into fashion, but I love reading about the history and evolution of it. My favorite textile history fact is that the ancient Romans loved really sheer, floaty silks, but at the time the fashion in China, where the silk was produced, was for heavy, intricate brocades. So the Romans would import the heavier fabrics, painstakingly unravel them, and use the silk thread to weave the fabric they liked.
Save