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villainous-queer: elfwreck: injuries-in-dust: nineprotons: Dolly’s absolute amazingness aside… She is who she wants to be, and shows herself as she wants to. Anyone who sees her as a joke is in fact the joke themselves and I’m quite happy to laugh at them. The real joke is that she’s the one finding it, not the government. She purposely does this, y’all. I have been fascinated by her for years and she has purposely crafted this and people reacting like this is her intention. She is a master. Like, how many country artists can get away with openly being a queer ally and funding AIDS research and COVID research and all this other stuff and yet still I defy you to find a person–no matter how conservative–who will say anything worse than ‘she’s trashy’ to you–but it can’t even insult her because she says she’s trashy!! She is so good at this y’all. A master at the whole concept of reclaiming and owning one’s image. All hail Dolly. : villainous-queer: elfwreck: injuries-in-dust: nineprotons: Dolly’s absolute amazingness aside… She is who she wants to be, and shows herself as she wants to. Anyone who sees her as a joke is in fact the joke themselves and I’m quite happy to laugh at them. The real joke is that she’s the one finding it, not the government. She purposely does this, y’all. I have been fascinated by her for years and she has purposely crafted this and people reacting like this is her intention. She is a master. Like, how many country artists can get away with openly being a queer ally and funding AIDS research and COVID research and all this other stuff and yet still I defy you to find a person–no matter how conservative–who will say anything worse than ‘she’s trashy’ to you–but it can’t even insult her because she says she’s trashy!! She is so good at this y’all. A master at the whole concept of reclaiming and owning one’s image. All hail Dolly.
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what-even-is-thiss: bobcatdump: jaskiegg: mellomaia: aphony-cree: beyoncescock: gahdamnpunk: Honestly!!! This is just psychological trauma in the making THANK YOU I’ve asked parents about this and they always say they are teaching the child responsibility and “respect for other people’s things.” If I point out that the child accidentally broke their own toy they always say “I bought them that toy” or “my sister gave that to them.” The problem is that parents view all possessions as not really belonging to the child. A part of them always seems to think that the adult who provided the money is the real owner If a parent breaks a dish they see it as breaking something that already belonged to them, but if a child breaks it they see it as the child breaking something that belonged to the parents People raising children need to realize that household possessions belong to the entire household. If everyone has to use that plate then it belongs to everyone and anyone can have a forgivable accident with it. It’s okay to deem certain possessions as just yours and ask everyone in the house to respect that, but extend the same respect to your child’s belongings Big mood. I know most of these are talking about little little kids, but here’s a tale from middle school. I had forgotten to charge my phone one night, and this was back when cell phones used to beep loudly when they were low on battery. I kept hearing the noise throughout the afternoon and not recognizing what it was because I’d never heard it before. When I finally did realize what it was, I was in science class and my fellow classmates were making presentations. I reached into my bag to try to turn off the phone, and then the low-battery sound went off, loud enough for the teacher to hear it. She confiscated my phone in front of everyone, and I didn’t get it back until after the weekend because it was a Friday. I was really embarrassed, especially to tell my parents. When I got my phone back that Monday, my teacher said it was important for me to learn this lesson now since in college they wouldn’t tolerate phones going off. Fast forward to when I was in college, any time someone’s phone went off, either the professor would tell them to turn it off, or they would say, “Oh, my bad,” and turn it off themselves, and everyone would move on. I even had a professor who danced around while someone’s phone went off, and it was a welcome moment of levity during the lecture. I say all this to say, one of the worst aspects of being a child/teen was adults assuming my intentions were malicious. God I’ve been reading these posts for a while and each time I am struck with the realization that certainly not all parents were supposed to be a parent “I say all this to say, one of the worst aspects of being a child/teen was adults assuming my intentions were malicious.”YES this The problem is, even if families are forgiving the culture around children still effects the child. I use myself as proof of that. A few times between the ages of 4 and 18 I broke things. I broke my grandma’s favorite Christmas ornament. Her first question was: “Are you hurt?” and when I apologized profusely she said “I’m just glad you weren’t hurt.” I broke a few plates. I broke a couple glasses. Every time my dad’s first response was “Did you get cut?” the second step was cleaning up the broken bits, and the third was a discussion of what led to me breaking it and how I could avoid doing that in the future. Same with spills. Same with stains. My biggest “punishment” from my immediate family was being taught how to clean up the mess I made and being shown in detail how to avoid the same mistake in the future if it was avoidable. There were consequences for my actions, but they were the direct result of those actions and nothing much beyond that. My family tried so hard to teach me how to deal with accidents in a healthy way. They were patient. They treated every slip-up as a learning opportunity. They showed me a lot of love. The other adults still got to me. Teachers still punished and publicly shamed me and other students for our mess-ups. Extended family members outside of my small supportive circle still yelled at me. My friends’ parents still got mad. To the point where whenever I messed up my first instinct was that my dad or grandparents were going to punish me, or yell at me, or hit me, even though they never did. They just didn’t. They always responded with patience and an attitude of “I’m glad you’re safe and I want to help you learn from this.” And I was still afraid of messing up. Mortified. Expecting the worst every time. It’s like… we need to change the culture around this, man. Completely. : what-even-is-thiss: bobcatdump: jaskiegg: mellomaia: aphony-cree: beyoncescock: gahdamnpunk: Honestly!!! This is just psychological trauma in the making THANK YOU I’ve asked parents about this and they always say they are teaching the child responsibility and “respect for other people’s things.” If I point out that the child accidentally broke their own toy they always say “I bought them that toy” or “my sister gave that to them.” The problem is that parents view all possessions as not really belonging to the child. A part of them always seems to think that the adult who provided the money is the real owner If a parent breaks a dish they see it as breaking something that already belonged to them, but if a child breaks it they see it as the child breaking something that belonged to the parents People raising children need to realize that household possessions belong to the entire household. If everyone has to use that plate then it belongs to everyone and anyone can have a forgivable accident with it. It’s okay to deem certain possessions as just yours and ask everyone in the house to respect that, but extend the same respect to your child’s belongings Big mood. I know most of these are talking about little little kids, but here’s a tale from middle school. I had forgotten to charge my phone one night, and this was back when cell phones used to beep loudly when they were low on battery. I kept hearing the noise throughout the afternoon and not recognizing what it was because I’d never heard it before. When I finally did realize what it was, I was in science class and my fellow classmates were making presentations. I reached into my bag to try to turn off the phone, and then the low-battery sound went off, loud enough for the teacher to hear it. She confiscated my phone in front of everyone, and I didn’t get it back until after the weekend because it was a Friday. I was really embarrassed, especially to tell my parents. When I got my phone back that Monday, my teacher said it was important for me to learn this lesson now since in college they wouldn’t tolerate phones going off. Fast forward to when I was in college, any time someone’s phone went off, either the professor would tell them to turn it off, or they would say, “Oh, my bad,” and turn it off themselves, and everyone would move on. I even had a professor who danced around while someone’s phone went off, and it was a welcome moment of levity during the lecture. I say all this to say, one of the worst aspects of being a child/teen was adults assuming my intentions were malicious. God I’ve been reading these posts for a while and each time I am struck with the realization that certainly not all parents were supposed to be a parent “I say all this to say, one of the worst aspects of being a child/teen was adults assuming my intentions were malicious.”YES this The problem is, even if families are forgiving the culture around children still effects the child. I use myself as proof of that. A few times between the ages of 4 and 18 I broke things. I broke my grandma’s favorite Christmas ornament. Her first question was: “Are you hurt?” and when I apologized profusely she said “I’m just glad you weren’t hurt.” I broke a few plates. I broke a couple glasses. Every time my dad’s first response was “Did you get cut?” the second step was cleaning up the broken bits, and the third was a discussion of what led to me breaking it and how I could avoid doing that in the future. Same with spills. Same with stains. My biggest “punishment” from my immediate family was being taught how to clean up the mess I made and being shown in detail how to avoid the same mistake in the future if it was avoidable. There were consequences for my actions, but they were the direct result of those actions and nothing much beyond that. My family tried so hard to teach me how to deal with accidents in a healthy way. They were patient. They treated every slip-up as a learning opportunity. They showed me a lot of love. The other adults still got to me. Teachers still punished and publicly shamed me and other students for our mess-ups. Extended family members outside of my small supportive circle still yelled at me. My friends’ parents still got mad. To the point where whenever I messed up my first instinct was that my dad or grandparents were going to punish me, or yell at me, or hit me, even though they never did. They just didn’t. They always responded with patience and an attitude of “I’m glad you’re safe and I want to help you learn from this.” And I was still afraid of messing up. Mortified. Expecting the worst every time. It’s like… we need to change the culture around this, man. Completely.

what-even-is-thiss: bobcatdump: jaskiegg: mellomaia: aphony-cree: beyoncescock: gahdamnpunk: Honestly!!! This is just psychologica...

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dreamsofamadman: somethingaboutdelia: cryingalonewithfrankenstein: This photo always cheers me up a bit. It’s a front-page article from 1955 about Christine Jorgensen, one of the first women to have sex-reassignment surgery. Since the text is a bit small and I couldn’t find a larger copy, here’s what the small blurb says: A World of a Difference George W. Jorgensen, Jr., son of a Bronx carpenter, served in the Army for two years and was given honorable discharge in 1946. Now George is no more. After six operations, Jorgensen’s sex has been changed and today she is a striking woman, working as a photographer in Denmark. Parents were informed of the big change in a letter Christine (that’s her new name) sent to them recently. This article is 58 years old, and it’s more respectful of Christine’s pronoun choices and name than some publications are today. It makes me happy to see a newspaper be respectful of a trans person’s choice of name and pronouns like that :3 Say it again for the haters in the back who want to keep pretending that trans people, or even treating trans people with respect is even remotely anything new. 😎 It’s worth mentioning, that this was kinda celebrated as a wonder of the atomic age at the time. “Look at the power of our scientists! Look at what we can do!”You know, back when America was trying to be the leader in scientific advancement. : dreamsofamadman: somethingaboutdelia: cryingalonewithfrankenstein: This photo always cheers me up a bit. It’s a front-page article from 1955 about Christine Jorgensen, one of the first women to have sex-reassignment surgery. Since the text is a bit small and I couldn’t find a larger copy, here’s what the small blurb says: A World of a Difference George W. Jorgensen, Jr., son of a Bronx carpenter, served in the Army for two years and was given honorable discharge in 1946. Now George is no more. After six operations, Jorgensen’s sex has been changed and today she is a striking woman, working as a photographer in Denmark. Parents were informed of the big change in a letter Christine (that’s her new name) sent to them recently. This article is 58 years old, and it’s more respectful of Christine’s pronoun choices and name than some publications are today. It makes me happy to see a newspaper be respectful of a trans person’s choice of name and pronouns like that :3 Say it again for the haters in the back who want to keep pretending that trans people, or even treating trans people with respect is even remotely anything new. 😎 It’s worth mentioning, that this was kinda celebrated as a wonder of the atomic age at the time. “Look at the power of our scientists! Look at what we can do!”You know, back when America was trying to be the leader in scientific advancement.

dreamsofamadman: somethingaboutdelia: cryingalonewithfrankenstein: This photo always cheers me up a bit. It’s a front-page article fro...

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ilyone: mydesignispeople: nyaruhodou: nyaruhodou: i know i say how much i love alison croggon all the time but…. i love this woman Edit: Since this post got really popular it would be awesome if y'all supported her by checking out her books! She does her best to be super inclusive and also her writing is beautiful and poetic. If you like fantasy, check out The Books of Pellinor, and if you like sci-fi, Fleshers is awesome!! in light of JKR once again being an utter garbage fire, here’s a fantasy author who actually is a good person Alison Croggon is amazing and one of my favorite authors ever. The Books of Pellinor are well-written, have a satisfying ending, and feature minority, female, and disabled characters. Ooooh I need to check her books !!!!  : ilyone: mydesignispeople: nyaruhodou: nyaruhodou: i know i say how much i love alison croggon all the time but…. i love this woman Edit: Since this post got really popular it would be awesome if y'all supported her by checking out her books! She does her best to be super inclusive and also her writing is beautiful and poetic. If you like fantasy, check out The Books of Pellinor, and if you like sci-fi, Fleshers is awesome!! in light of JKR once again being an utter garbage fire, here’s a fantasy author who actually is a good person Alison Croggon is amazing and one of my favorite authors ever. The Books of Pellinor are well-written, have a satisfying ending, and feature minority, female, and disabled characters. Ooooh I need to check her books !!!! 

ilyone: mydesignispeople: nyaruhodou: nyaruhodou: i know i say how much i love alison croggon all the time but…. i love this woman...

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soft-riddler: honeybuddhahoe: kosherdyke: sugarbutchy: twitblr: Rest in Power to Our Allies Who Risk Their Life Fighting With Us and For Our Rights https://www.clevelandjewishnews.com/news/local_news/osu-graduate-22-dies-after-attending-protests-in-columbus/article_dcadd6b2-a75d-11ea-94c3-e7751ddd6d55.html May her memory be a blessing Z"L it gets worse tho! the original person who reported this on twitter said she did NOT die of asthma related syptoms. Thats what they WANTED us to think!! she died bcause they sprayed so much tear gas in her face that she inhaled too much and DIED. HER DEATH WAS NOT CAUSED BY ASTHMA RELATED SYMPTOMS. Only tear gas. Solely tear gas. They murdered her. And remember not to say Rest In Peace for her. She was jewish. Say “may her memory be a blessing” like it says above. : soft-riddler: honeybuddhahoe: kosherdyke: sugarbutchy: twitblr: Rest in Power to Our Allies Who Risk Their Life Fighting With Us and For Our Rights https://www.clevelandjewishnews.com/news/local_news/osu-graduate-22-dies-after-attending-protests-in-columbus/article_dcadd6b2-a75d-11ea-94c3-e7751ddd6d55.html May her memory be a blessing Z"L it gets worse tho! the original person who reported this on twitter said she did NOT die of asthma related syptoms. Thats what they WANTED us to think!! she died bcause they sprayed so much tear gas in her face that she inhaled too much and DIED. HER DEATH WAS NOT CAUSED BY ASTHMA RELATED SYMPTOMS. Only tear gas. Solely tear gas. They murdered her. And remember not to say Rest In Peace for her. She was jewish. Say “may her memory be a blessing” like it says above.

soft-riddler: honeybuddhahoe: kosherdyke: sugarbutchy: twitblr: Rest in Power to Our Allies Who Risk Their Life Fighting With Us and...

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kevinkevinson: “You two could at least say hello,” Wymack said, somewhat aggrieved. “There’s no point,” Kevin said. “All they are is a distraction.“ “It’s called a support network. Look it up.“ “Thea is watching from South tonight,” Kevin said, looking to the elevated VIP box. It was too far away and too high up for Neil to make out any faces, but there was a small crowd gathered at the windowed walls already. Knowing the Court was here to watch them play sent a chill through Neil’s veins. Kevin dragged his stare back to Wymack’s face and said, “and my father comes to all of my games. That is enough." On Wymack’s other side, Abby’s gaze softened. Wymack’s jaw worked for a moment before he could say in an even tone, "Your mother would be proud of you." "Not just of me,” Kevin said in a rare bout of humanity.-The King’s Men (All for the Game Book 3) by Nora Sakavicmy scene for the @giveyourbacktome-zine​! I had so much fun working on this and I was lucky to snag a #dadscene :D: kevinkevinson: “You two could at least say hello,” Wymack said, somewhat aggrieved. “There’s no point,” Kevin said. “All they are is a distraction.“ “It’s called a support network. Look it up.“ “Thea is watching from South tonight,” Kevin said, looking to the elevated VIP box. It was too far away and too high up for Neil to make out any faces, but there was a small crowd gathered at the windowed walls already. Knowing the Court was here to watch them play sent a chill through Neil’s veins. Kevin dragged his stare back to Wymack’s face and said, “and my father comes to all of my games. That is enough." On Wymack’s other side, Abby’s gaze softened. Wymack’s jaw worked for a moment before he could say in an even tone, "Your mother would be proud of you." "Not just of me,” Kevin said in a rare bout of humanity.-The King’s Men (All for the Game Book 3) by Nora Sakavicmy scene for the @giveyourbacktome-zine​! I had so much fun working on this and I was lucky to snag a #dadscene :D

kevinkevinson: “You two could at least say hello,” Wymack said, somewhat aggrieved. “There’s no point,” Kevin said. “All they are is a d...

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evilkitten3: yaschiri: bea2me: Bright spots where you can find them: this action is illegal and the mayor is doing it anyway. There’s a “historic preservation” law in Birmingham that makes it difficult to impossible to get rid of landmarks past a certain age that “just happened to” grandfather in all the Confederate nastiness around town. Many have wanted this thing gone for a while but there was no legal way to do it. It’s getting done now. Reblogging with this addition. Important context.Also to say, anyone in the comments who is upset at “”“history”“” being removed, we literally don’t need this. Nobody is about to forget the hundreds of years of oppression that white people have put PoC and esp black people through. And if you forget or you do not teach that to your children, you’re the problem, hands down. also: history is not recorded in statues. it’s recorded in books. history is glorified in statues.: evilkitten3: yaschiri: bea2me: Bright spots where you can find them: this action is illegal and the mayor is doing it anyway. There’s a “historic preservation” law in Birmingham that makes it difficult to impossible to get rid of landmarks past a certain age that “just happened to” grandfather in all the Confederate nastiness around town. Many have wanted this thing gone for a while but there was no legal way to do it. It’s getting done now. Reblogging with this addition. Important context.Also to say, anyone in the comments who is upset at “”“history”“” being removed, we literally don’t need this. Nobody is about to forget the hundreds of years of oppression that white people have put PoC and esp black people through. And if you forget or you do not teach that to your children, you’re the problem, hands down. also: history is not recorded in statues. it’s recorded in books. history is glorified in statues.

evilkitten3: yaschiri: bea2me: Bright spots where you can find them: this action is illegal and the mayor is doing it anyway. There’s a...

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107bees: randomslasher: zoblogs: daphnetrodon: daphnetrodon: didyouknowmagic: froglezbian: straight people shut up challenge Frank stop. Go read a book or yell at a cloud it would be just as useful as this statement you left on Twitter. He did add this later, which is… something? [x] good ending This is what people mean when they say that privilege is invisible to the people who have it. It never occurred to him that knowing someone’s orientation would be important to anyone, because to him, a straight man, representation is everywhere. It’s overabundant. It’s so common as to be taken for granted. To him, representation of his sexuality isn’t important because it’s there.  I love that he learned. I love watching people understand their own blind spots when it comes to privilege.  Can also be filed under: why cancel culture is dumb, people need to make mistakes to grow : 107bees: randomslasher: zoblogs: daphnetrodon: daphnetrodon: didyouknowmagic: froglezbian: straight people shut up challenge Frank stop. Go read a book or yell at a cloud it would be just as useful as this statement you left on Twitter. He did add this later, which is… something? [x] good ending This is what people mean when they say that privilege is invisible to the people who have it. It never occurred to him that knowing someone’s orientation would be important to anyone, because to him, a straight man, representation is everywhere. It’s overabundant. It’s so common as to be taken for granted. To him, representation of his sexuality isn’t important because it’s there.  I love that he learned. I love watching people understand their own blind spots when it comes to privilege.  Can also be filed under: why cancel culture is dumb, people need to make mistakes to grow

107bees: randomslasher: zoblogs: daphnetrodon: daphnetrodon: didyouknowmagic: froglezbian: straight people shut up challenge Fran...

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