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portentous-offerings: pg-chan: serialreblogger: jaubaius: A bird explaining to a hedgehog crossing so it doesn’t die. !!! ok but that’s legitimately what it’s doing!! That’s a corvid right there (looks like a hooded crow, to be precise), which means it’s intelligent enough to recognize, a) cars are dangerous and streets should be treated with a certain degree of caution, b) this car’s slowing down for them–cars do that sometimes–which means they’re not in imminent danger, so it doesn’t have to fly away just yet, c) that hedgehog’s still gonna get killed if it doesn’t MOVE, FAST (cars can change speed very quickly and the hedgehog’s still in the way), and almost certainly also d) if the bird does nothing it gets a free lunch. Y’all, Y’ALL. This bird is consciously deciding to put itself in danger in order to save the life of a very stupid creature. A creature which, if the bird did nothing, could be free food.  i can’t - look if you follow me you know I have a thing for corvids, but this is - like!!! People are always saying “ah yes they have sub-human intelligence and don’t consider anything that isn’t immediately necessary for their own survival/pleasure,” but! Whether or not it can do philosophy, this crow is clearly demonstrating compassion. Even if it’s just the kind of compassion a toddler shows to a snail, a social creature that instinctively recognizes the potential for emotion in other beings, that’s still huge and cool and important and corvids!!! are! neat!!!  Also, by the car stopping for them, that hedgehog has two other species actively working to help it stay alive for no gain of their own.  Reminds me of that professor who said the beginning of civilization was when someone took care of another. The broken thigh bone thing. “Helping someone else through difficulty is where civilization starts. We are at our best when we serve others.” - Margaret Mead : portentous-offerings: pg-chan: serialreblogger: jaubaius: A bird explaining to a hedgehog crossing so it doesn’t die. !!! ok but that’s legitimately what it’s doing!! That’s a corvid right there (looks like a hooded crow, to be precise), which means it’s intelligent enough to recognize, a) cars are dangerous and streets should be treated with a certain degree of caution, b) this car’s slowing down for them–cars do that sometimes–which means they’re not in imminent danger, so it doesn’t have to fly away just yet, c) that hedgehog’s still gonna get killed if it doesn’t MOVE, FAST (cars can change speed very quickly and the hedgehog’s still in the way), and almost certainly also d) if the bird does nothing it gets a free lunch. Y’all, Y’ALL. This bird is consciously deciding to put itself in danger in order to save the life of a very stupid creature. A creature which, if the bird did nothing, could be free food.  i can’t - look if you follow me you know I have a thing for corvids, but this is - like!!! People are always saying “ah yes they have sub-human intelligence and don’t consider anything that isn’t immediately necessary for their own survival/pleasure,” but! Whether or not it can do philosophy, this crow is clearly demonstrating compassion. Even if it’s just the kind of compassion a toddler shows to a snail, a social creature that instinctively recognizes the potential for emotion in other beings, that’s still huge and cool and important and corvids!!! are! neat!!!  Also, by the car stopping for them, that hedgehog has two other species actively working to help it stay alive for no gain of their own.  Reminds me of that professor who said the beginning of civilization was when someone took care of another. The broken thigh bone thing. “Helping someone else through difficulty is where civilization starts. We are at our best when we serve others.” - Margaret Mead
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livelaughlovematters: SAVE OUR OCEANS! Did you know that the Oceans cover 71 percent of the planet and are home to important species and ecosystems that we rely on for food, livelihoods, climate regulation and more! Also, an estimated 17.6 billion pounds of plastic leaks into the marine environment from land-based sources every year—that’s roughly equivalent to dumping a garbage truck full of plastic into our oceans every minute and plastics never go away! This is why we must urge everyone to use plastic-free alternatives and say no to single use plastics such as straws, plastic cutlery, coffee cups, water bottles, plastic bags, balloons, plastic-wrapped produce and take-out food containers. Source: Oceana => HELP RAISE AWARENESS WITH ONE OF THESE WHALE BRACELET AVAILABLE HERE <= : livelaughlovematters: SAVE OUR OCEANS! Did you know that the Oceans cover 71 percent of the planet and are home to important species and ecosystems that we rely on for food, livelihoods, climate regulation and more! Also, an estimated 17.6 billion pounds of plastic leaks into the marine environment from land-based sources every year—that’s roughly equivalent to dumping a garbage truck full of plastic into our oceans every minute and plastics never go away! This is why we must urge everyone to use plastic-free alternatives and say no to single use plastics such as straws, plastic cutlery, coffee cups, water bottles, plastic bags, balloons, plastic-wrapped produce and take-out food containers. Source: Oceana => HELP RAISE AWARENESS WITH ONE OF THESE WHALE BRACELET AVAILABLE HERE <=

livelaughlovematters: SAVE OUR OCEANS! Did you know that the Oceans cover 71 percent of the planet and are home to important species and...

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livelaughlovematters: SAVE OUR OCEANS! Did you know that the Oceans cover 71 percent of the planet and are home to important species and ecosystems that we rely on for food, livelihoods, climate regulation and more! Also, an estimated 17.6 billion pounds of plastic leaks into the marine environment from land-based sources every year—that’s roughly equivalent to dumping a garbage truck full of plastic into our oceans every minute and plastics never go away! This is why we must urge everyone to use plastic-free alternatives and say no to single use plastics such as straws, plastic cutlery, coffee cups, water bottles, plastic bags, balloons, plastic-wrapped produce and take-out food containers. Source: Oceana => HELP RAISE AWARENESS WITH ONE OF THESE WHALE BRACELET AVAILABLE HERE <= : livelaughlovematters: SAVE OUR OCEANS! Did you know that the Oceans cover 71 percent of the planet and are home to important species and ecosystems that we rely on for food, livelihoods, climate regulation and more! Also, an estimated 17.6 billion pounds of plastic leaks into the marine environment from land-based sources every year—that’s roughly equivalent to dumping a garbage truck full of plastic into our oceans every minute and plastics never go away! This is why we must urge everyone to use plastic-free alternatives and say no to single use plastics such as straws, plastic cutlery, coffee cups, water bottles, plastic bags, balloons, plastic-wrapped produce and take-out food containers. Source: Oceana => HELP RAISE AWARENESS WITH ONE OF THESE WHALE BRACELET AVAILABLE HERE <=

livelaughlovematters: SAVE OUR OCEANS! Did you know that the Oceans cover 71 percent of the planet and are home to important species and...

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livelaughlovematters: SAVE OUR OCEANS! Did you know that the Oceans cover 71 percent of the planet and are home to important species and ecosystems that we rely on for food, livelihoods, climate regulation and more! Also, an estimated 17.6 billion pounds of plastic leaks into the marine environment from land-based sources every year—that’s roughly equivalent to dumping a garbage truck full of plastic into our oceans every minute and plastics never go away! This is why we must urge everyone to use plastic-free alternatives and say no to single use plastics such as straws, plastic cutlery, coffee cups, water bottles, plastic bags, balloons, plastic-wrapped produce and take-out food containers. Source: Oceana => HELP RAISE AWARENESS WITH ONE OF THESE WHALE BRACELET AVAILABLE HERE <= : livelaughlovematters: SAVE OUR OCEANS! Did you know that the Oceans cover 71 percent of the planet and are home to important species and ecosystems that we rely on for food, livelihoods, climate regulation and more! Also, an estimated 17.6 billion pounds of plastic leaks into the marine environment from land-based sources every year—that’s roughly equivalent to dumping a garbage truck full of plastic into our oceans every minute and plastics never go away! This is why we must urge everyone to use plastic-free alternatives and say no to single use plastics such as straws, plastic cutlery, coffee cups, water bottles, plastic bags, balloons, plastic-wrapped produce and take-out food containers. Source: Oceana => HELP RAISE AWARENESS WITH ONE OF THESE WHALE BRACELET AVAILABLE HERE <=

livelaughlovematters: SAVE OUR OCEANS! Did you know that the Oceans cover 71 percent of the planet and are home to important species and...

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ups-dogs: On this day I was challenged…and on this day, I prevailed.Beset upon on all sides by this veritable menagerie of merciless, multi-species moochers, I was determined to dig deep in order to satisfy their dissimilar and daunting dietary demands. My time in the Boy Scouts taught me “be prepared” and I have carried that lesson into my career at UPS by always maintaining a supply of carrots for horses, granola bars for the swine, and, of course, Milk Bones for the dogs.I am proud to say that I was finally rewarded for my preparations by this powerful example of pure photographic perfection; a profound, poignant and pastoral picture of a pittie, piggy and pony posse….all in one shot!A lesser driver would have squandered this golden opportunity by simply retreating, leaving nothing but a trail of hungry and frustrated animals in his wake. But not I. Thirty one years of experience plying my trade on the lonely back roads of Newberg, Oregon have taught me a valuable lesson; that excuses are never an option. I have a solemn duty to uphold. The uniform that I proudly wear says “UPS” and that brand name stands for something; Unlimited Puppypiggypony Snacks!By Scott Hodges.: ups-dogs: On this day I was challenged…and on this day, I prevailed.Beset upon on all sides by this veritable menagerie of merciless, multi-species moochers, I was determined to dig deep in order to satisfy their dissimilar and daunting dietary demands. My time in the Boy Scouts taught me “be prepared” and I have carried that lesson into my career at UPS by always maintaining a supply of carrots for horses, granola bars for the swine, and, of course, Milk Bones for the dogs.I am proud to say that I was finally rewarded for my preparations by this powerful example of pure photographic perfection; a profound, poignant and pastoral picture of a pittie, piggy and pony posse….all in one shot!A lesser driver would have squandered this golden opportunity by simply retreating, leaving nothing but a trail of hungry and frustrated animals in his wake. But not I. Thirty one years of experience plying my trade on the lonely back roads of Newberg, Oregon have taught me a valuable lesson; that excuses are never an option. I have a solemn duty to uphold. The uniform that I proudly wear says “UPS” and that brand name stands for something; Unlimited Puppypiggypony Snacks!By Scott Hodges.

ups-dogs: On this day I was challenged…and on this day, I prevailed.Beset upon on all sides by this veritable menagerie of merciless, mu...

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livelaughlovematters: SAVE OUR OCEANS! Did you know that the Oceans cover 71 percent of the planet and are home to important species and ecosystems that we rely on for food, livelihoods, climate regulation and more! Also, an estimated 17.6 billion pounds of plastic leaks into the marine environment from land-based sources every year—that’s roughly equivalent to dumping a garbage truck full of plastic into our oceans every minute and plastics never go away! This is why we must urge everyone to use plastic-free alternatives and say no to single use plastics such as straws, plastic cutlery, coffee cups, water bottles, plastic bags, balloons, plastic-wrapped produce and take-out food containers. Source: Oceana => HELP RAISE AWARENESS WITH ONE OF THESE WHALE BRACELET AVAILABLE HERE <= : livelaughlovematters: SAVE OUR OCEANS! Did you know that the Oceans cover 71 percent of the planet and are home to important species and ecosystems that we rely on for food, livelihoods, climate regulation and more! Also, an estimated 17.6 billion pounds of plastic leaks into the marine environment from land-based sources every year—that’s roughly equivalent to dumping a garbage truck full of plastic into our oceans every minute and plastics never go away! This is why we must urge everyone to use plastic-free alternatives and say no to single use plastics such as straws, plastic cutlery, coffee cups, water bottles, plastic bags, balloons, plastic-wrapped produce and take-out food containers. Source: Oceana => HELP RAISE AWARENESS WITH ONE OF THESE WHALE BRACELET AVAILABLE HERE <=

livelaughlovematters: SAVE OUR OCEANS! Did you know that the Oceans cover 71 percent of the planet and are home to important species an...

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livelaughlovematters: SAVE OUR OCEANS! Did you know that the Oceans cover 71 percent of the planet and are home to important species and ecosystems that we rely on for food, livelihoods, climate regulation and more! Also, an estimated 17.6 billion pounds of plastic leaks into the marine environment from land-based sources every year—that’s roughly equivalent to dumping a garbage truck full of plastic into our oceans every minute and plastics never go away! This is why we must urge everyone to use plastic-free alternatives and say no to single use plastics such as straws, plastic cutlery, coffee cups, water bottles, plastic bags, balloons, plastic-wrapped produce and take-out food containers. Source: Oceana => HELP RAISE AWARENESS WITH ONE OF THESE WHALE BRACELET AVAILABLE HERE <= : livelaughlovematters: SAVE OUR OCEANS! Did you know that the Oceans cover 71 percent of the planet and are home to important species and ecosystems that we rely on for food, livelihoods, climate regulation and more! Also, an estimated 17.6 billion pounds of plastic leaks into the marine environment from land-based sources every year—that’s roughly equivalent to dumping a garbage truck full of plastic into our oceans every minute and plastics never go away! This is why we must urge everyone to use plastic-free alternatives and say no to single use plastics such as straws, plastic cutlery, coffee cups, water bottles, plastic bags, balloons, plastic-wrapped produce and take-out food containers. Source: Oceana => HELP RAISE AWARENESS WITH ONE OF THESE WHALE BRACELET AVAILABLE HERE <=

livelaughlovematters: SAVE OUR OCEANS! Did you know that the Oceans cover 71 percent of the planet and are home to important species and...

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why-animals-do-the-thing: actualaster: kidzbopdeathgrips: sydario: springcottage: thedragonwoodconservancy on ig laser gun gator boys oh my god i didn’t realize this video had audio Okay as adorable as this looks, I’m pretty sure that’s a distress sound?  A “mommy help me I’m scared come save me!” sound? @why-animals-do-the-thing This video is from Dragonwood Wildlife Conservancy, and they are yearling (last year’s babies) Cuban crocodiles. Good news for you, this isn’t actually a distress call! According to @kaijutegu​ (and her giant bookshelf full of reptile resources), the laser sounds are an affiliative social call that young Cuban crocodiles use to communicate with their parents. They normally stop making the noise at around two years old, which is approximately when they start dispersing from the family group. See, Cuban crocodiles are a super social species - and one of the few where the fathers stick around and provide paternal care for the babies! In the wild, babies would regularly interact with both parents, including when they provide food. This call is basically the type of vocalization that the babies use to communicated with their parents. These crocodiles are being hand-raised as part of a private-sector breeding and reintroduction program (because the parents are so protective of their offspring that if you left them the babies to raise, you’d never be able to safely get close to them), and so they’re responding to the guy in the video the same way because he’s constant known safe individual and also the provider of food. He’s not a threat - his presence is a good thing, and he’s worth interacting with because it normally means food. You can also tell from their behavior and body language that they’re not stressed: some of the crocodiles are actively climbing on him and interaction of their own volition, but the ones that aren’t don’t show any indicators of hyper-vigilance. If that were a distress call, every crocodile that heard it would be alert and on edge looking for the threat. Distress calls tend to only happen once or twice, because in the wild continuing to make noise makes a baby more vulnerable: so these crocodiles wouldn’t be continually vocalizing if they felt threatened. There’s no snapping or gaping or freezing, all of which would be behavioral indicators of distress or discomfort. (Here’s a video of a baby nile crocodile being harassed by photographers which will give you a visual reference for both freezing and gaping.) So, hey, this is certifiably cute - and good for conservation! Babus: why-animals-do-the-thing: actualaster: kidzbopdeathgrips: sydario: springcottage: thedragonwoodconservancy on ig laser gun gator boys oh my god i didn’t realize this video had audio Okay as adorable as this looks, I’m pretty sure that’s a distress sound?  A “mommy help me I’m scared come save me!” sound? @why-animals-do-the-thing This video is from Dragonwood Wildlife Conservancy, and they are yearling (last year’s babies) Cuban crocodiles. Good news for you, this isn’t actually a distress call! According to @kaijutegu​ (and her giant bookshelf full of reptile resources), the laser sounds are an affiliative social call that young Cuban crocodiles use to communicate with their parents. They normally stop making the noise at around two years old, which is approximately when they start dispersing from the family group. See, Cuban crocodiles are a super social species - and one of the few where the fathers stick around and provide paternal care for the babies! In the wild, babies would regularly interact with both parents, including when they provide food. This call is basically the type of vocalization that the babies use to communicated with their parents. These crocodiles are being hand-raised as part of a private-sector breeding and reintroduction program (because the parents are so protective of their offspring that if you left them the babies to raise, you’d never be able to safely get close to them), and so they’re responding to the guy in the video the same way because he’s constant known safe individual and also the provider of food. He’s not a threat - his presence is a good thing, and he’s worth interacting with because it normally means food. You can also tell from their behavior and body language that they’re not stressed: some of the crocodiles are actively climbing on him and interaction of their own volition, but the ones that aren’t don’t show any indicators of hyper-vigilance. If that were a distress call, every crocodile that heard it would be alert and on edge looking for the threat. Distress calls tend to only happen once or twice, because in the wild continuing to make noise makes a baby more vulnerable: so these crocodiles wouldn’t be continually vocalizing if they felt threatened. There’s no snapping or gaping or freezing, all of which would be behavioral indicators of distress or discomfort. (Here’s a video of a baby nile crocodile being harassed by photographers which will give you a visual reference for both freezing and gaping.) So, hey, this is certifiably cute - and good for conservation! Babus
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bogleech: iratusmagus: acesirius: spongebobsquarepants: hey guys, i know some things about sharks because my boyfriend loves them even though they horrify me this is a frilled shark (one of my least favourite shark species, second only to the greenland shark)  this is what it looks like from a side angle it’s much more recognisable as a shark, yes? much less terrifying, yes? it only grows to about 2m long (which seems big but compared to other sharks is fairly small)  by ‘dinosaur era’, they mean that it exhibits many primitive features that suggests that it hasn’t evolved much in a few million years, and it has been dubbed a ‘living fossil’  that does not mean that it is from the age of the dinosaurs and has only just reappeared as far as i can tell (like i said, i know nothing about sharks) these have been around and known of for a long time. they pose no danger to humans and have rarely been encountered alive can we please stop making sharks out to be these terrifying creatures? it’s just a fish A silly fish that does fish things! Leave our fishy friend alone. These went around the news years ago like they were “just discovered” but were first described generations prior and I basically see that happen to another animal almost daily : bogleech: iratusmagus: acesirius: spongebobsquarepants: hey guys, i know some things about sharks because my boyfriend loves them even though they horrify me this is a frilled shark (one of my least favourite shark species, second only to the greenland shark)  this is what it looks like from a side angle it’s much more recognisable as a shark, yes? much less terrifying, yes? it only grows to about 2m long (which seems big but compared to other sharks is fairly small)  by ‘dinosaur era’, they mean that it exhibits many primitive features that suggests that it hasn’t evolved much in a few million years, and it has been dubbed a ‘living fossil’  that does not mean that it is from the age of the dinosaurs and has only just reappeared as far as i can tell (like i said, i know nothing about sharks) these have been around and known of for a long time. they pose no danger to humans and have rarely been encountered alive can we please stop making sharks out to be these terrifying creatures? it’s just a fish A silly fish that does fish things! Leave our fishy friend alone. These went around the news years ago like they were “just discovered” but were first described generations prior and I basically see that happen to another animal almost daily

bogleech: iratusmagus: acesirius: spongebobsquarepants: hey guys, i know some things about sharks because my boyfriend loves them eve...

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bogleech: cazort: marvelousgameofdisneythrones: pangur-and-grim: my favourite part of the Evolutionary Biology courses I took at the University of Toronto was learning that several bird species have 3+ sexes? the ruff bird is a great example - each male variant has a different (and successful!) reproductive strategy, and a different chromosomal sequence. unlike the ruff bird, human sex falls into a bimodal distribution - this means there are two strong peaks (”typical” male and female morphs), with a whole lot in between. evolution is nice way of saying “statistics played out longterm among living organisms”, and evolutionarily successful traits….aren’t something to hold up as natural or moral, or representative of an advanced state. it’s literally just fuck tactics that make your group size increase. (though fucking isn’t always the best route, as asexual reproduction is massively advantageous as a short-term strategy, and certain species dominate the landscape by switching between sexual/asexual depending on environmental conditions) besides all that, the strength of humankind has always been our ability to work together communally, and that’s straight science. so even if you went down the extremely problematic path of valuing fellow humans based on their potential evolutionary contribution (coughs, eugenics, coughs), there would still be zero scientific basis behind discriminating against trans, non-binary and intersex people.  tl;dr here’s a challenge to all the bigots out there: please stop using “science” as a defence when the actual science is (overwhelmingly) against you. Science: pissing off bigots of all kinds since its inception. I find White-throated sparrows fascinating. They have two color morphs, the bright one: And the drab one: The two morphs have very different behavior. The bright ones are more aggressive, setting up territories and defending them, being more aggressive about defending against predators. They sing more often. The dull ones are quieter and less aggressive. They are more attentive to the nest, and better at feeding nestlings. The morphs tend to make a good pairing for raising children because they specialize in different roles. The dull-colored birds, being more camouflaged, are safer when sitting on the nest, and are better able to hide. The bright-colored birds, being more visible, are better able to intimidate predators and rivals. Interestingly though, both color morphs occur in both female and male birds. And birds tend to pair up with both opposite sex and opposite color morph birds. The dimorphism and different roles that, in most birds, are strongly associated with biological sex, in this species has evolved to be abstracted and separated from biological sex. Some people have described this system as the birds having “four sexes”. It’s been proposed that some life may have only first split into multiple sexes in order to confuse or slow down parasites so maybe some folks get offended cause deep down they just think roundworms will get them : bogleech: cazort: marvelousgameofdisneythrones: pangur-and-grim: my favourite part of the Evolutionary Biology courses I took at the University of Toronto was learning that several bird species have 3+ sexes? the ruff bird is a great example - each male variant has a different (and successful!) reproductive strategy, and a different chromosomal sequence. unlike the ruff bird, human sex falls into a bimodal distribution - this means there are two strong peaks (”typical” male and female morphs), with a whole lot in between. evolution is nice way of saying “statistics played out longterm among living organisms”, and evolutionarily successful traits….aren’t something to hold up as natural or moral, or representative of an advanced state. it’s literally just fuck tactics that make your group size increase. (though fucking isn’t always the best route, as asexual reproduction is massively advantageous as a short-term strategy, and certain species dominate the landscape by switching between sexual/asexual depending on environmental conditions) besides all that, the strength of humankind has always been our ability to work together communally, and that’s straight science. so even if you went down the extremely problematic path of valuing fellow humans based on their potential evolutionary contribution (coughs, eugenics, coughs), there would still be zero scientific basis behind discriminating against trans, non-binary and intersex people.  tl;dr here’s a challenge to all the bigots out there: please stop using “science” as a defence when the actual science is (overwhelmingly) against you. Science: pissing off bigots of all kinds since its inception. I find White-throated sparrows fascinating. They have two color morphs, the bright one: And the drab one: The two morphs have very different behavior. The bright ones are more aggressive, setting up territories and defending them, being more aggressive about defending against predators. They sing more often. The dull ones are quieter and less aggressive. They are more attentive to the nest, and better at feeding nestlings. The morphs tend to make a good pairing for raising children because they specialize in different roles. The dull-colored birds, being more camouflaged, are safer when sitting on the nest, and are better able to hide. The bright-colored birds, being more visible, are better able to intimidate predators and rivals. Interestingly though, both color morphs occur in both female and male birds. And birds tend to pair up with both opposite sex and opposite color morph birds. The dimorphism and different roles that, in most birds, are strongly associated with biological sex, in this species has evolved to be abstracted and separated from biological sex. Some people have described this system as the birds having “four sexes”. It’s been proposed that some life may have only first split into multiple sexes in order to confuse or slow down parasites so maybe some folks get offended cause deep down they just think roundworms will get them
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ao3tagoftheday: ao3tagoftheday: ao3tagoftheday: The AO3 Tag of the Day is: I appreciate your dedication to duty Well, apparently we all want to know about bat cunnilingus, so here you go, you complete fucking perverts:A species of bat (known because of reasons as the Indian flying fox) has been observed (by researchers even more perverted than y'all) to engage in cunnilingus both before and after penetrative sex. The cunnilingus before sex usually lasts about 50 seconds, while the penetrative sex lasts only about 15 seconds. Crucially, the penetrative sex lasts longer on average when the preceding cunnilingus lasted longer. In other words, eating out your partner will get you a better fuck. Who would have thought…(Here’s the journal article reporting all this and much more, in case you for some reason need more information.)Anyway, go have fun having sex with bats or something. I’m going to bed. For those once again requesting information about bat sex, here you go. Remember to eat out your vulva/vagina owning partners, if they’re into it. Even the bats know you get better sex if you do!: i literally researched bat sex for this fic, help me, it cannot be unseen, i swear to god im not a furry ao3tagoftheday: ao3tagoftheday: ao3tagoftheday: The AO3 Tag of the Day is: I appreciate your dedication to duty Well, apparently we all want to know about bat cunnilingus, so here you go, you complete fucking perverts:A species of bat (known because of reasons as the Indian flying fox) has been observed (by researchers even more perverted than y'all) to engage in cunnilingus both before and after penetrative sex. The cunnilingus before sex usually lasts about 50 seconds, while the penetrative sex lasts only about 15 seconds. Crucially, the penetrative sex lasts longer on average when the preceding cunnilingus lasted longer. In other words, eating out your partner will get you a better fuck. Who would have thought…(Here’s the journal article reporting all this and much more, in case you for some reason need more information.)Anyway, go have fun having sex with bats or something. I’m going to bed. For those once again requesting information about bat sex, here you go. Remember to eat out your vulva/vagina owning partners, if they’re into it. Even the bats know you get better sex if you do!
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vaspider: shaaknaa: emi–rose: osberend: iopele: suspendnodisbelief: naamahdarling: optimysticals: youwantmuchmore: thebestoftumbling: golden eagle having a relaxing time This is the world’s largest flying Engine of Murder marveling at the fact that it can actually have its tummy rubbed. I feel like this is the next step up on “loose your fingers” roulette from petting a kittie’s tummy, but just below belly rubs for say a lion. Can someone who knows birds better than I do tell me whether this eagle is as happy as it looks?  Because I want it to be happy.  It looks so happy.  Bewildered by having a friend, but so happy. Just popping on this thread to confirm: yes, the eagle is happy about the belly rubs. Golden eagles make this sound when receiving allopreening and similar affectionate and soothing treatment from their parents and mates. It’s the “I am safe and well fed, and somebody familiar is taking good care of me” sound. Angry raptors and wounded raptors make some pretty dramatic hisses and shrieks; frightened raptors go dead silent and try to hide if they can, or fluff up big and get loud and in-your-face if hiding isn’t an option. They can easily sever a finger or break the bones of a human hand or wrist, and even with a very thick leather falconer’s gauntlet, I’ve known falconers to leave a mews (hawk house) with graphic punctures THROUGH the gauntlet into the meat of their hands and arms, just from buteos and kestrels way smaller than this eagle. A pissed off hawk will make damn sure you don’t try twice whatever you pulled that pissed her off, even if she’s been human-imprinted. If you’re ever unsure about an animal’s level of okayness with something that’s happening, there are three spot-check questions you can ask, to common-sense your way through it: 1. Is the animal capable of defending itself or making a threatening or fearful display, or otherwise giving protest, and if so, is it using this ability? (e.g. dog snarling or biting, swan hissing, horse kicking or biting) 2. Does the animal experience an incentive-based relationship with the human? (i.e. does the animal have a reason, in the animal’s frame of reference, for being near this human? e.g. dog sharing companionship / food / shelter, hawk receiving good quality abundant food and shelter and medical care from a falconer) 3. Is the animal a domesticated species, with at least a full century of consistent species cohabitation with humans? (Domesticated animals frequently are conditioned from birth or by selective breeding to be unbothered by human actions that upset their feral nearest relatives.) In this situation, YES the eagle can self-defend, YES the eagle has incentive to cooperate with and trust the human handler, and NO the eagle is not a domesticated species, meaning we can expect a high level of reactivity to distress, compared to domestic animals: if the eagle was distressed, it would be pretty visible and apparent to the viewer. These aren’t a universally applicable metric, but they’re a good start for mammal and bird interactions. Pair that with the knowledge that eagles reserve those chirps for calm environments, and you can be pretty secure and comfy in the knowledge that the big honkin’ birb is happy and cozy. Also, to anybody wondering, falconers are almost single-handedly responsible for the recovery from near-extinction of several raptor species, including and especially peregrine falcons. Most hawks only live with the falconer for a year, and most of that year is spent getting the bird in ideal condition for survival and success as a wild breeding adult. Falconers are extensively trained and dedicated wildlife conservationists, pretty much by definition, especially in the continental USA, and they make up an unspeakably important part of the overall conservation of predatory bird species. Predatory birds are an important part of every ecosystem they inhabit. Just like apiarists and their bees, the relationship between falconer and hawk is one of great benefit to the animal and the ecosystem, in exchange for a huge amount of time, effort, expense, and education on the part of the human, for very little personal benefit to that one human. It’s definitely not exploitation of the bird, and most hawks working with falconers are hawks who absolutely would not have reached adulthood without human help: the sick, the injured, and the “runts” of the nest who don’t receive adequate resources from their own parents. These are, by and large, wonderful people who are in love with the natural world and putting a lifetime of knowledge and sheer exhausting work into conserving it and its winged wonders. reblogged for excellent info, I’m so glad that big gorgeous birb really is as happy as it looks! Today’s bit of positive activism: A reminder that, although the world may contain many bad and awful things, it also contains an enormous winged predator clucking happily as a human gives it a belly rub. @marywhal is bird-cat!! @vaspider birb : vaspider: shaaknaa: emi–rose: osberend: iopele: suspendnodisbelief: naamahdarling: optimysticals: youwantmuchmore: thebestoftumbling: golden eagle having a relaxing time This is the world’s largest flying Engine of Murder marveling at the fact that it can actually have its tummy rubbed. I feel like this is the next step up on “loose your fingers” roulette from petting a kittie’s tummy, but just below belly rubs for say a lion. Can someone who knows birds better than I do tell me whether this eagle is as happy as it looks?  Because I want it to be happy.  It looks so happy.  Bewildered by having a friend, but so happy. Just popping on this thread to confirm: yes, the eagle is happy about the belly rubs. Golden eagles make this sound when receiving allopreening and similar affectionate and soothing treatment from their parents and mates. It’s the “I am safe and well fed, and somebody familiar is taking good care of me” sound. Angry raptors and wounded raptors make some pretty dramatic hisses and shrieks; frightened raptors go dead silent and try to hide if they can, or fluff up big and get loud and in-your-face if hiding isn’t an option. They can easily sever a finger or break the bones of a human hand or wrist, and even with a very thick leather falconer’s gauntlet, I’ve known falconers to leave a mews (hawk house) with graphic punctures THROUGH the gauntlet into the meat of their hands and arms, just from buteos and kestrels way smaller than this eagle. A pissed off hawk will make damn sure you don’t try twice whatever you pulled that pissed her off, even if she’s been human-imprinted. If you’re ever unsure about an animal’s level of okayness with something that’s happening, there are three spot-check questions you can ask, to common-sense your way through it: 1. Is the animal capable of defending itself or making a threatening or fearful display, or otherwise giving protest, and if so, is it using this ability? (e.g. dog snarling or biting, swan hissing, horse kicking or biting) 2. Does the animal experience an incentive-based relationship with the human? (i.e. does the animal have a reason, in the animal’s frame of reference, for being near this human? e.g. dog sharing companionship / food / shelter, hawk receiving good quality abundant food and shelter and medical care from a falconer) 3. Is the animal a domesticated species, with at least a full century of consistent species cohabitation with humans? (Domesticated animals frequently are conditioned from birth or by selective breeding to be unbothered by human actions that upset their feral nearest relatives.) In this situation, YES the eagle can self-defend, YES the eagle has incentive to cooperate with and trust the human handler, and NO the eagle is not a domesticated species, meaning we can expect a high level of reactivity to distress, compared to domestic animals: if the eagle was distressed, it would be pretty visible and apparent to the viewer. These aren’t a universally applicable metric, but they’re a good start for mammal and bird interactions. Pair that with the knowledge that eagles reserve those chirps for calm environments, and you can be pretty secure and comfy in the knowledge that the big honkin’ birb is happy and cozy. Also, to anybody wondering, falconers are almost single-handedly responsible for the recovery from near-extinction of several raptor species, including and especially peregrine falcons. Most hawks only live with the falconer for a year, and most of that year is spent getting the bird in ideal condition for survival and success as a wild breeding adult. Falconers are extensively trained and dedicated wildlife conservationists, pretty much by definition, especially in the continental USA, and they make up an unspeakably important part of the overall conservation of predatory bird species. Predatory birds are an important part of every ecosystem they inhabit. Just like apiarists and their bees, the relationship between falconer and hawk is one of great benefit to the animal and the ecosystem, in exchange for a huge amount of time, effort, expense, and education on the part of the human, for very little personal benefit to that one human. It’s definitely not exploitation of the bird, and most hawks working with falconers are hawks who absolutely would not have reached adulthood without human help: the sick, the injured, and the “runts” of the nest who don’t receive adequate resources from their own parents. These are, by and large, wonderful people who are in love with the natural world and putting a lifetime of knowledge and sheer exhausting work into conserving it and its winged wonders. reblogged for excellent info, I’m so glad that big gorgeous birb really is as happy as it looks! Today’s bit of positive activism: A reminder that, although the world may contain many bad and awful things, it also contains an enormous winged predator clucking happily as a human gives it a belly rub. @marywhal is bird-cat!! @vaspider birb
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feanor-the-dragon: ginchface: positive-memes: Wholesome Manatees this is actually bullshit trump administration deregulation, the manatee is still in danger. in fact, the trump administration recently weakened the endangered species act in general so that people now have to consider the financial cost of saving a species that may or may not be declared endangered.  remember that an endangered species isn’t governed by like the UN or something, it’s an invention of the american government to protect at-risk species—and they’re redefining what an endangered species actually is, so people don’t have to consider them anymore. they’re redefining what an endangered species actually is, so people don’t have to consider them anymore. Guys! Guys guys guys! WHAT THE F*CK THIS IS THE VERSION YOU NEED TO REBLOG. Here is a link with more recent info. the article linked by previous person was from 2017. This one is from this year and highlights the changes and effects. And here is the official release The biggest change is that protections will be given based on economic considerations. Allegedly, this is to reduce the burden on the american public, which is funny, considering certain things we won’t unpack right here. Have a look, see for yourself. Guys, boost this. : TIME SUBSCRIBE SCIENCE Manatees Are No Longer Listed as Endangered Species Dank Coal Sijposting MANITY RESTORED feanor-the-dragon: ginchface: positive-memes: Wholesome Manatees this is actually bullshit trump administration deregulation, the manatee is still in danger. in fact, the trump administration recently weakened the endangered species act in general so that people now have to consider the financial cost of saving a species that may or may not be declared endangered.  remember that an endangered species isn’t governed by like the UN or something, it’s an invention of the american government to protect at-risk species—and they’re redefining what an endangered species actually is, so people don’t have to consider them anymore. they’re redefining what an endangered species actually is, so people don’t have to consider them anymore. Guys! Guys guys guys! WHAT THE F*CK THIS IS THE VERSION YOU NEED TO REBLOG. Here is a link with more recent info. the article linked by previous person was from 2017. This one is from this year and highlights the changes and effects. And here is the official release The biggest change is that protections will be given based on economic considerations. Allegedly, this is to reduce the burden on the american public, which is funny, considering certain things we won’t unpack right here. Have a look, see for yourself. Guys, boost this.
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