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andauril: tellmevarric: vampmissedith: orphanspace: virginiaisforhaters: maaarine: “15 Men React To The Idea Of Taking Their Wife’s Last Name After Marriage” Men believe the family is their domain but when it comes to watching the children or doing chores suddenly it’s not their responsibility THAT LAST COMMENT THOUGH. We as a society need to discuss why it’s considered necessary for a woman to take a man’s name in a marriage, and why it is considered degrading the other way around. Take a minute to think about that: things that are considered necessary for women are degrading for men. It shows how society views women when you think of that. At one of my school reunions, I met one of my former classmates who had taken his wife’s surname. He was so chill about it. Told everyone very proudly that his wife was an only child (and so was her father and grandfather) so if she’d taken his last name or even if they’d hyphenated, she’d be the last of her family so he’d happily taken her name so that wouldn’t happen. The funny thing about it was that he was such a sexist piece of shit when he was at school. So, you know, people can grow and change. My mother kept her last name when she married my father, and he hyphenated, but ONLY because he had a son from his first marriage and he wanted for his son to share his last name too, else he’d taken my mother’s. Seriously, where the fuck is it emasculating to take your wife’s name. Men have to stop being babies ffs. : 15 Men React To The Idea Of Taking Their Wife's Last Name After Marriage By Mélanie Berliet View Comments 5. "There's something so emasculating about the notion of a man washing away his name altogether. The thought makes me uncomfortable, and kind of angry Edgar, 25 8. "No way. ological impulse ng. Biologically, the word domain keeps popping into my head. That sounds misogynistic, I know. But at my core, when all is said and done, I believe that the family is my domain. For instance, in any hypothetical state of emergency, I'm going be the one to sacrifice my life to save my wife and children. I should be the one whose name lives on." Raul, 29 12. "Listen, I'm a feminist. But we have to draw the line somewhere. Equal rights shouldn't come at the cost of upending all established conventions. Why get married at all if you don't want to embrace the related traditions?" Elijah, 27 14. "I have some friends out west who've done the combo last name thing for the baby, and that seems fair. Starting a new lineage is kind of cool. But taking her name? That's not fair. That's just lame. No thanks." Ethan, 30 andauril: tellmevarric: vampmissedith: orphanspace: virginiaisforhaters: maaarine: “15 Men React To The Idea Of Taking Their Wife’s Last Name After Marriage” Men believe the family is their domain but when it comes to watching the children or doing chores suddenly it’s not their responsibility THAT LAST COMMENT THOUGH. We as a society need to discuss why it’s considered necessary for a woman to take a man’s name in a marriage, and why it is considered degrading the other way around. Take a minute to think about that: things that are considered necessary for women are degrading for men. It shows how society views women when you think of that. At one of my school reunions, I met one of my former classmates who had taken his wife’s surname. He was so chill about it. Told everyone very proudly that his wife was an only child (and so was her father and grandfather) so if she’d taken his last name or even if they’d hyphenated, she’d be the last of her family so he’d happily taken her name so that wouldn’t happen. The funny thing about it was that he was such a sexist piece of shit when he was at school. So, you know, people can grow and change. My mother kept her last name when she married my father, and he hyphenated, but ONLY because he had a son from his first marriage and he wanted for his son to share his last name too, else he’d taken my mother’s. Seriously, where the fuck is it emasculating to take your wife’s name. Men have to stop being babies ffs.
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<p><a href="http://todayinhistory.tumblr.com/post/158676765715/march-21st-1960-sharpeville-massacre-on-this-day" class="tumblr_blog">todayinhistory</a>:</p> <blockquote><h2><b>March 21st 1960: Sharpeville massacre</b><br/></h2><p><small>On this day in 1960, police opened fire on peaceful anti-apartheid protestors in the South African township of Sharpeville, killing 69. The over 5,000 strong crowd gathered at Sharpeville police station to protest the discriminatory pass laws, which they claimed were designed to limit their movement in designated white only areas. The laws required all black men and women to carry reference books with their name, tax code and employer details; those found without their book could be arrested and detained. The protest encouraged black South Africans to deliberately leave their pass books at home and present themselves at police stations for arrest, which would crowd prisons and lead to a labour shortage. Despite the protestors’ peaceful and non-violent intentions, police opened fire on the crowd. By the day’s end, 69 people were dead and 180 were wounded. A further 77 were arrested and questioned, though no police officer involved in the massacre was ever convicted as the government relieved all officials of any responsibility. The apartheid government responded to the massacre by banning public meetings, outlawing the African National Congress (ANC) and declaring a state of emergency. The incident convinced anti-apartheid leader and ANC member Nelson Mandela to abandon non-violence and organise paramilitary groups to fight the racist system of apartheid. In 1996, 36 years later, then President Mandela chose Sharpeville as the site at which he signed into law the country’s new post-apartheid constitution.</small></p><blockquote><p> <b><i>“People were running in all directions, some couldn’t believe that people had been shot, they thought they had heard firecrackers. Only when they saw the blood and dead people, did they see that the police meant business”</i></b><br/><small>- Tom Petrus, eyewitness to the Sharpeville massacre</small><br/></p></blockquote></blockquote>: MERS <p><a href="http://todayinhistory.tumblr.com/post/158676765715/march-21st-1960-sharpeville-massacre-on-this-day" class="tumblr_blog">todayinhistory</a>:</p> <blockquote><h2><b>March 21st 1960: Sharpeville massacre</b><br/></h2><p><small>On this day in 1960, police opened fire on peaceful anti-apartheid protestors in the South African township of Sharpeville, killing 69. The over 5,000 strong crowd gathered at Sharpeville police station to protest the discriminatory pass laws, which they claimed were designed to limit their movement in designated white only areas. The laws required all black men and women to carry reference books with their name, tax code and employer details; those found without their book could be arrested and detained. The protest encouraged black South Africans to deliberately leave their pass books at home and present themselves at police stations for arrest, which would crowd prisons and lead to a labour shortage. Despite the protestors’ peaceful and non-violent intentions, police opened fire on the crowd. By the day’s end, 69 people were dead and 180 were wounded. A further 77 were arrested and questioned, though no police officer involved in the massacre was ever convicted as the government relieved all officials of any responsibility. The apartheid government responded to the massacre by banning public meetings, outlawing the African National Congress (ANC) and declaring a state of emergency. The incident convinced anti-apartheid leader and ANC member Nelson Mandela to abandon non-violence and organise paramilitary groups to fight the racist system of apartheid. In 1996, 36 years later, then President Mandela chose Sharpeville as the site at which he signed into law the country’s new post-apartheid constitution.</small></p><blockquote><p> <b><i>“People were running in all directions, some couldn’t believe that people had been shot, they thought they had heard firecrackers. Only when they saw the blood and dead people, did they see that the police meant business”</i></b><br/><small>- Tom Petrus, eyewitness to the Sharpeville massacre</small><br/></p></blockquote></blockquote>

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