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what-even-is-thiss: bobcatdump: jaskiegg: mellomaia: aphony-cree: beyoncescock: gahdamnpunk: Honestly!!! This is just psychological trauma in the making THANK YOU I’ve asked parents about this and they always say they are teaching the child responsibility and “respect for other people’s things.” If I point out that the child accidentally broke their own toy they always say “I bought them that toy” or “my sister gave that to them.” The problem is that parents view all possessions as not really belonging to the child. A part of them always seems to think that the adult who provided the money is the real owner If a parent breaks a dish they see it as breaking something that already belonged to them, but if a child breaks it they see it as the child breaking something that belonged to the parents People raising children need to realize that household possessions belong to the entire household. If everyone has to use that plate then it belongs to everyone and anyone can have a forgivable accident with it. It’s okay to deem certain possessions as just yours and ask everyone in the house to respect that, but extend the same respect to your child’s belongings Big mood. I know most of these are talking about little little kids, but here’s a tale from middle school. I had forgotten to charge my phone one night, and this was back when cell phones used to beep loudly when they were low on battery. I kept hearing the noise throughout the afternoon and not recognizing what it was because I’d never heard it before. When I finally did realize what it was, I was in science class and my fellow classmates were making presentations. I reached into my bag to try to turn off the phone, and then the low-battery sound went off, loud enough for the teacher to hear it. She confiscated my phone in front of everyone, and I didn’t get it back until after the weekend because it was a Friday. I was really embarrassed, especially to tell my parents. When I got my phone back that Monday, my teacher said it was important for me to learn this lesson now since in college they wouldn’t tolerate phones going off. Fast forward to when I was in college, any time someone’s phone went off, either the professor would tell them to turn it off, or they would say, “Oh, my bad,” and turn it off themselves, and everyone would move on. I even had a professor who danced around while someone’s phone went off, and it was a welcome moment of levity during the lecture. I say all this to say, one of the worst aspects of being a child/teen was adults assuming my intentions were malicious. God I’ve been reading these posts for a while and each time I am struck with the realization that certainly not all parents were supposed to be a parent “I say all this to say, one of the worst aspects of being a child/teen was adults assuming my intentions were malicious.”YES this The problem is, even if families are forgiving the culture around children still effects the child. I use myself as proof of that. A few times between the ages of 4 and 18 I broke things. I broke my grandma’s favorite Christmas ornament. Her first question was: “Are you hurt?” and when I apologized profusely she said “I’m just glad you weren’t hurt.” I broke a few plates. I broke a couple glasses. Every time my dad’s first response was “Did you get cut?” the second step was cleaning up the broken bits, and the third was a discussion of what led to me breaking it and how I could avoid doing that in the future. Same with spills. Same with stains. My biggest “punishment” from my immediate family was being taught how to clean up the mess I made and being shown in detail how to avoid the same mistake in the future if it was avoidable. There were consequences for my actions, but they were the direct result of those actions and nothing much beyond that. My family tried so hard to teach me how to deal with accidents in a healthy way. They were patient. They treated every slip-up as a learning opportunity. They showed me a lot of love. The other adults still got to me. Teachers still punished and publicly shamed me and other students for our mess-ups. Extended family members outside of my small supportive circle still yelled at me. My friends’ parents still got mad. To the point where whenever I messed up my first instinct was that my dad or grandparents were going to punish me, or yell at me, or hit me, even though they never did. They just didn’t. They always responded with patience and an attitude of “I’m glad you’re safe and I want to help you learn from this.” And I was still afraid of messing up. Mortified. Expecting the worst every time. It’s like… we need to change the culture around this, man. Completely. : what-even-is-thiss: bobcatdump: jaskiegg: mellomaia: aphony-cree: beyoncescock: gahdamnpunk: Honestly!!! This is just psychological trauma in the making THANK YOU I’ve asked parents about this and they always say they are teaching the child responsibility and “respect for other people’s things.” If I point out that the child accidentally broke their own toy they always say “I bought them that toy” or “my sister gave that to them.” The problem is that parents view all possessions as not really belonging to the child. A part of them always seems to think that the adult who provided the money is the real owner If a parent breaks a dish they see it as breaking something that already belonged to them, but if a child breaks it they see it as the child breaking something that belonged to the parents People raising children need to realize that household possessions belong to the entire household. If everyone has to use that plate then it belongs to everyone and anyone can have a forgivable accident with it. It’s okay to deem certain possessions as just yours and ask everyone in the house to respect that, but extend the same respect to your child’s belongings Big mood. I know most of these are talking about little little kids, but here’s a tale from middle school. I had forgotten to charge my phone one night, and this was back when cell phones used to beep loudly when they were low on battery. I kept hearing the noise throughout the afternoon and not recognizing what it was because I’d never heard it before. When I finally did realize what it was, I was in science class and my fellow classmates were making presentations. I reached into my bag to try to turn off the phone, and then the low-battery sound went off, loud enough for the teacher to hear it. She confiscated my phone in front of everyone, and I didn’t get it back until after the weekend because it was a Friday. I was really embarrassed, especially to tell my parents. When I got my phone back that Monday, my teacher said it was important for me to learn this lesson now since in college they wouldn’t tolerate phones going off. Fast forward to when I was in college, any time someone’s phone went off, either the professor would tell them to turn it off, or they would say, “Oh, my bad,” and turn it off themselves, and everyone would move on. I even had a professor who danced around while someone’s phone went off, and it was a welcome moment of levity during the lecture. I say all this to say, one of the worst aspects of being a child/teen was adults assuming my intentions were malicious. God I’ve been reading these posts for a while and each time I am struck with the realization that certainly not all parents were supposed to be a parent “I say all this to say, one of the worst aspects of being a child/teen was adults assuming my intentions were malicious.”YES this The problem is, even if families are forgiving the culture around children still effects the child. I use myself as proof of that. A few times between the ages of 4 and 18 I broke things. I broke my grandma’s favorite Christmas ornament. Her first question was: “Are you hurt?” and when I apologized profusely she said “I’m just glad you weren’t hurt.” I broke a few plates. I broke a couple glasses. Every time my dad’s first response was “Did you get cut?” the second step was cleaning up the broken bits, and the third was a discussion of what led to me breaking it and how I could avoid doing that in the future. Same with spills. Same with stains. My biggest “punishment” from my immediate family was being taught how to clean up the mess I made and being shown in detail how to avoid the same mistake in the future if it was avoidable. There were consequences for my actions, but they were the direct result of those actions and nothing much beyond that. My family tried so hard to teach me how to deal with accidents in a healthy way. They were patient. They treated every slip-up as a learning opportunity. They showed me a lot of love. The other adults still got to me. Teachers still punished and publicly shamed me and other students for our mess-ups. Extended family members outside of my small supportive circle still yelled at me. My friends’ parents still got mad. To the point where whenever I messed up my first instinct was that my dad or grandparents were going to punish me, or yell at me, or hit me, even though they never did. They just didn’t. They always responded with patience and an attitude of “I’m glad you’re safe and I want to help you learn from this.” And I was still afraid of messing up. Mortified. Expecting the worst every time. It’s like… we need to change the culture around this, man. Completely.

what-even-is-thiss: bobcatdump: jaskiegg: mellomaia: aphony-cree: beyoncescock: gahdamnpunk: Honestly!!! This is just psychologica...

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animatedamerican: lithiumbot: I dreamt that there was a show called “Dadbeard the Pirate” which was about a middle-aged pirate captain who suddenly had to raise two daughters that he didnt know he had.  One was the daughter of a noblewoman and was classically trained in swordfighting and sailing, the other was the daughter of a tavern wench and had a lot of practical experience around shipyards.  Dadbeard himself was bewildered at his role as a father but supportive of his new family. Episodes focused on the castmembers learning how to get along with each other while engaging in typical pirate activities, I.E. attacking trade ships and searching for treasure. Dadbeard’s signature move was sweeping his daughers up in a huge hug that lifted them off the ground.  I would watch the hell out of this. : animatedamerican: lithiumbot: I dreamt that there was a show called “Dadbeard the Pirate” which was about a middle-aged pirate captain who suddenly had to raise two daughters that he didnt know he had.  One was the daughter of a noblewoman and was classically trained in swordfighting and sailing, the other was the daughter of a tavern wench and had a lot of practical experience around shipyards.  Dadbeard himself was bewildered at his role as a father but supportive of his new family. Episodes focused on the castmembers learning how to get along with each other while engaging in typical pirate activities, I.E. attacking trade ships and searching for treasure. Dadbeard’s signature move was sweeping his daughers up in a huge hug that lifted them off the ground.  I would watch the hell out of this.

animatedamerican: lithiumbot: I dreamt that there was a show called “Dadbeard the Pirate” which was about a middle-aged pirate captain w...

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feniczoroark: solaredarisen: randomnightlord: adoalter: xenobot-kin: irons-in-the-web: xenobot-kin: empathmantis: EXCUSE ME WHILE I LAUGH FOR 100 YEARS Not to be, like, extra cynical or anything but like, The Oscars aren’t known for being super supportive of diversity, so is it kind of odd that the only movie up there with an openly gay character. So like, this might just meant to be knocking the MCU for reasons, but like this seems a bit, IDK, sinister to me, just saying SORRY ARE YOU TALKING ABOUT THE GUY WITH NO NAME WHO MENTIONS HIS DEAD HUSBAND IN ONE SCENE AND THEN NEVER APPEARS AGAIN? THAT CHARACTER? YOU THINK THAT’S WHY THE OSCARS DIDN’T GIVE ENDGAME ANY AWARDS? I mean yeah that’s exactly what I’m trying to imply lol The Oscars has a pretty shaky history with LGBT+ people, topics, and depictions, so like it seems plausible to me.  Oh my god please shut up Those Marvel Fanboys really be pulling shit out of their collective asses to explain this Avenger: Endgame is below Avatar.The movie that literally almost everyone forgot it exist somehow. Am I the only person who enjoyed that avatar? I enjoyed Avatar at first until I catched the undertones. : feniczoroark: solaredarisen: randomnightlord: adoalter: xenobot-kin: irons-in-the-web: xenobot-kin: empathmantis: EXCUSE ME WHILE I LAUGH FOR 100 YEARS Not to be, like, extra cynical or anything but like, The Oscars aren’t known for being super supportive of diversity, so is it kind of odd that the only movie up there with an openly gay character. So like, this might just meant to be knocking the MCU for reasons, but like this seems a bit, IDK, sinister to me, just saying SORRY ARE YOU TALKING ABOUT THE GUY WITH NO NAME WHO MENTIONS HIS DEAD HUSBAND IN ONE SCENE AND THEN NEVER APPEARS AGAIN? THAT CHARACTER? YOU THINK THAT’S WHY THE OSCARS DIDN’T GIVE ENDGAME ANY AWARDS? I mean yeah that’s exactly what I’m trying to imply lol The Oscars has a pretty shaky history with LGBT+ people, topics, and depictions, so like it seems plausible to me.  Oh my god please shut up Those Marvel Fanboys really be pulling shit out of their collective asses to explain this Avenger: Endgame is below Avatar.The movie that literally almost everyone forgot it exist somehow. Am I the only person who enjoyed that avatar? I enjoyed Avatar at first until I catched the undertones.
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adoalter: xenobot-kin: irons-in-the-web: xenobot-kin: empathmantis: EXCUSE ME WHILE I LAUGH FOR 100 YEARS Not to be, like, extra cynical or anything but like, The Oscars aren’t known for being super supportive of diversity, so is it kind of odd that the only movie up there with an openly gay character. So like, this might just meant to be knocking the MCU for reasons, but like this seems a bit, IDK, sinister to me, just saying SORRY ARE YOU TALKING ABOUT THE GUY WITH NO NAME WHO MENTIONS HIS DEAD HUSBAND IN ONE SCENE AND THEN NEVER APPEARS AGAIN? THAT CHARACTER? YOU THINK THAT’S WHY THE OSCARS DIDN’T GIVE ENDGAME ANY AWARDS? I mean yeah that’s exactly what I’m trying to imply lol The Oscars has a pretty shaky history with LGBT+ people, topics, and depictions, so like it seems plausible to me.  Oh my god please shut up Those Marvel Fanboys really be pulling shit out of their collective asses to explain this: adoalter: xenobot-kin: irons-in-the-web: xenobot-kin: empathmantis: EXCUSE ME WHILE I LAUGH FOR 100 YEARS Not to be, like, extra cynical or anything but like, The Oscars aren’t known for being super supportive of diversity, so is it kind of odd that the only movie up there with an openly gay character. So like, this might just meant to be knocking the MCU for reasons, but like this seems a bit, IDK, sinister to me, just saying SORRY ARE YOU TALKING ABOUT THE GUY WITH NO NAME WHO MENTIONS HIS DEAD HUSBAND IN ONE SCENE AND THEN NEVER APPEARS AGAIN? THAT CHARACTER? YOU THINK THAT’S WHY THE OSCARS DIDN’T GIVE ENDGAME ANY AWARDS? I mean yeah that’s exactly what I’m trying to imply lol The Oscars has a pretty shaky history with LGBT+ people, topics, and depictions, so like it seems plausible to me.  Oh my god please shut up Those Marvel Fanboys really be pulling shit out of their collective asses to explain this
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gffa: Way of the Apprentice | by Jude WatsonI GIVE ANAKIN A LOT OF SHIT, BUT I REALLY LIKE THIS MOMENT A LOT.  I love that he feels a restlessness that the other Jedi don’t, because they grew up in a safe, secure, supportive environment, and Obi-Wan gets that Anakin isn’t quite the same and needs to run around a bit more.  It’s just FEELINGS ALL OVER THE PLACE FOR BOTH OF THEM.And I love that it shows the balance Obi-Wan is striking with Anakin–”either you obey a rule or you do not” is cutting through to the spirit of things, but that’s not necessarily a judgement thing.  Obi-Wan himself is “breaking the rules” by turning a blind eye to Anakin going out at night, because it’s for the good.  It fits so much with how it’s not about the letter of the law but about the spirit and intention of what you’re doing, the motivation behind it, the why of it, the bigger context of it.  That’s why it’s important to put in that Obi-Wan could sense the shift of an emotion in the blink of an eye, why it’s tied into the same context of Obi-Wan turning a blind eye when Anakin genuinely does need to get out and move.And I love that Anakin recognizes this part about himself.  He spends so much of his life not really understanding himself or what he really needs, that this moment of something that actually seems to help, along with how heartbreaking it is that he has to experience this feeling at all, just makes me allp.s. “Obi-Wan was amazingly perceptive.  He could sense the shift in emotion or thought faster than an eyeblink.” oh my god Anakin sounds EXACTLY LIKE ME when I talk about Obi-Wan, “He’s the greatest person who ever lived, he’s the smartest person who ever lived, THERE IS NO ONE BETTER.”SAME, ANAKIN.  SAME.  RIGHT DOWN TO I AM MAKING THE SAME EXACT FACE WHILE READING THIS BOOK.: Technically, he wasn't supposed to be outside the Temple at all, not without Obi-Wan's permission "Technically" is just another way of saying you are breaking the rules, Obi-Wan would say. Either you obey a rule, or you do not He was devoted to his Master, yet sometimes Obi-Wan's earnestness could really get in the way. Anakin didn't believe in breaking Jedi rules. He just wanted to find the spaces between them Anakin was well aware that his Master knew of these midnight jaunts. Obi-Wan was amazingly perceptive. He could sense a shift in emotion or thought faster than an eyeblink Thank the moon and stars that Obi-Wan also preferred not to hear about his midnight trips. As long as Anakin was discreet and didn't get into trouble, Obi-Wan would turn a blind eye Anakin didn't want to trouble Obi-Wan, but he couldn't help himself. As the night wore on and the Temple quieted, as the Jedi students turned off their glow rods and settled down for night meditation and sleep, Anakin just got restless. The lure of the streets called him. There were projects he had to complete, droids he was building or refining, parts to scavenge, rusty treasures to uncover. But mostly he just needed to be outside, under the stars Only those of us who have been slaves can he sometimes thought. really taste freedom, gffa: Way of the Apprentice | by Jude WatsonI GIVE ANAKIN A LOT OF SHIT, BUT I REALLY LIKE THIS MOMENT A LOT.  I love that he feels a restlessness that the other Jedi don’t, because they grew up in a safe, secure, supportive environment, and Obi-Wan gets that Anakin isn’t quite the same and needs to run around a bit more.  It’s just FEELINGS ALL OVER THE PLACE FOR BOTH OF THEM.And I love that it shows the balance Obi-Wan is striking with Anakin–”either you obey a rule or you do not” is cutting through to the spirit of things, but that’s not necessarily a judgement thing.  Obi-Wan himself is “breaking the rules” by turning a blind eye to Anakin going out at night, because it’s for the good.  It fits so much with how it’s not about the letter of the law but about the spirit and intention of what you’re doing, the motivation behind it, the why of it, the bigger context of it.  That’s why it’s important to put in that Obi-Wan could sense the shift of an emotion in the blink of an eye, why it’s tied into the same context of Obi-Wan turning a blind eye when Anakin genuinely does need to get out and move.And I love that Anakin recognizes this part about himself.  He spends so much of his life not really understanding himself or what he really needs, that this moment of something that actually seems to help, along with how heartbreaking it is that he has to experience this feeling at all, just makes me allp.s. “Obi-Wan was amazingly perceptive.  He could sense the shift in emotion or thought faster than an eyeblink.” oh my god Anakin sounds EXACTLY LIKE ME when I talk about Obi-Wan, “He’s the greatest person who ever lived, he’s the smartest person who ever lived, THERE IS NO ONE BETTER.”SAME, ANAKIN.  SAME.  RIGHT DOWN TO I AM MAKING THE SAME EXACT FACE WHILE READING THIS BOOK.
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