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9/11, Birthday, and Cars: Replies X I Remember My Dad Telling Me How He Survived In 9/11. Here Is The Story Just In Case While My Siblings Followed Me. We Got Outside And Saw Alot Of Emergency Vehicles. Fire Engines, Ambluances, Police Cars, FBI, Swat. A Doctor Brought Me And My Slblings To My Dad Inside The Ambluance. He Told Me If He Died He Will Always It Was A Long Summer Morning My Dad Didn't Be With Us. Then Smoke Came And Everyone Ran Take Me To School Instead He Showed Me His Saying "Keep Running Keep Running" Me And My Work, We Were At The 73rd Floor Then We Heard Siblings Felt So Scared But The Most Thing I Was A Loud Noise. The Boss Said "Stay Seated" But I Scared About Was My Dad Dieing. After The Horror Was Over We Got To The Hospital My looked Outside And The South Twin Tower Was On Fire. I Brought My Siblings To See What Had Happend My Siblings Told My Dad And I Countinued Looking But Thats When I And Everyone Else Knew It Wasnt An Accedeint.. I Say A Second Plane Coming Torwards The Tower I Was Family Came To The Hospital Imedeatly And Saw Us With Our Dad They Hugged Us Very Hard To See If We Were Okay. When It Was My Birthday My Family Gave Me A Surprise I Saw My Dad.. I Cried While Hugging Him Really Hard. Once I Hear In But A Different Floor. Thats When The Building Someone Talking About It Gives Me The Chills. Shake And A Loud Noise Came Along. My Dad E 2 Grabbed My Arm And Ran With Me, I Knew This 21 Was To Get To Safety My Dad Tripped And Fell Time Uncertainty: 1 (s) NIST Adjusted Time from TV Broadcasts NIST ATFTB (NIST RTFVA 5 s) RTFVA-TU 24:24 E 8:46 LL Matt Craig 1 second ago Rxndomz One more thing if your saying you saw Replies both buildings get hit at relatively the same time, 9 hours ago Matt Craig first of all it was probably more of a 17 minute difference from when the north tower got hit Hol up- correct me if I'm wrong but wasn't the (8:46) and when the south tower got hit (9:03). So it really wouldn't make sense that you guys were north tower hit first? If you were in the north tower and you saw the south tower get hit that would already hit so that looking at it for 17 minutes before getting out of there. And my last point is that you said you were mean the tower you were in was would mean your story is basically fake or you just on the 73rd floor, but the plane hit the tower you were in at around the 60th floor thus rendering you got some facts wrong. Idk if I'm wrong just tell me 2 trapped, but you still managed to use the stairs?? I'm calling bs on this story nothing with this story matches up 1 hour ago Rxndomz @Matt Craig yes thats what i meant X Nothing about this guys story matches up

Nothing about this guys story matches up

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Community, Facepalm, and Future: The futuremight just see algae a leaner fuel alternatic ith lower emissions berome Gr British denocracy to the bri dence vote the opposit ercome the litics and able to Aook ome that opular and plications for uch else in sparlaing deep che status of nd where A betwe the A Pe earth m odern elec tbe termen the more stark "Aruthless e the outer bounds constitutionally unpopular outcome The Washington Post Anne Applebaum "Aruling party that its own electoral future is shamefacedly supporting divided opposition seeks him but doesn't have a popular leader itself. "A conservative panyis using populist slogans thaa imelerine national institurton oid precedents and customs are being abandoned at great speed, leaving only a vacuum in their wake. Mr Richard Evans, writing in the left-leaning Prospect, invoked the always ominous analogy of Weimar Germany, where representative democracy collapsed amid significapt oil deposits and the isheries. Ocean territor primarily by a com chree consideratio ny shallow adjacem as a continental shel exclusive economic usually extend 370k coast. It gets compl those lines from difter crarian tensions shadow of an open nd ninister who came t over 92,000 mal party ballot ountry's elected force through a no one he initial push have nent. ththe explicit rmment would ther Brexit assels and then elections election before ed after a no-deal overlap. The interse the North Pole are apri potential place for territe disputes. Russia, Canada (via Alaska), Norway anc Denmark all have some morogation n will forfeit her countries play into ads. it would rexit voters fed up 's inertia to come an editorial The United al relied on existed der could ons. That nodern to a wedge of the *Arctic rest of the international community also has a cl inclusive uses of that po the Arctic Ocean. To deal with these co boundaries in a hostile environment, nations c Arctic Council in 1996 v Ottawa Declaration. I the five nations that ce North Pole, Finland, Ic Sweden complete the eight. Representatives indigenous peoples, o nations and non-gove organisations also par Increasingly, China that it's a near Arctic China already has mis Greenland, so its inte primarily be access te resources But it cou gambit to get a seata: Mr Johnson-who ign on a populist people versus the far-right gadfly rexit Party, which Johnson's right infighting, political paralysis and the schemes ofemboldened nationalists. day be part of und rules of democratic it as SagdgtyanctsagErmend the US are cratic nson's he poltics in many countries scenario, the Parry would have re and Mr Johnson ound to directly take Mr Corbyn. of uncertainty and ined British politics 2016 referendum. more in danger than they have been at any time since the e 1930s,"Mr Evans con For now thou left the ba Asz Ada Mem though, new approach offers that the West's most respected are not immune to the D olde demo dange ulses facing es elsewhere. Inagine what would t down Parliament? ime Minister Boyko neporters last u imagine the perhaps evena displace US presenc eventually (Perb explain Mr Trump Thursday Why do this?

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Disappointed, Facts, and Fail: AMERICAN AAPI SELATION AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF PHYSICIANS OF INDIAN ORIGIN oF INDE President Suresh Reddy, MD HR77 19500ma.om Prsiec Suduker o M ke August 21, 2019 via email and Fax and Express Mail to USA/London HO richard.horton@lancet.com; editorial@lancet.com Malcolm Molyneux; ombudsman@lancet.com Editor: Richard Horton Viee Peside Anupama Gotimu, M a gllcom Secetary aKMD nd@gmatcom The Lancet 230 Park Avenue New York, NY 10169 USA Treaue jBayan, MD ay om Iee Pst Prsident Nah Parkh, MD 350allom Chair, AA Bardof Trustees Seema Ar Mo .com Dear Mr. Horton, American Association of Physicians of Indian Origin, hereinafter AAPI, representing approx. 80,000 practicing physicians in the USA along with the platform for 40,000 Medical Students, Residents and Fellows, is disenchanted and greatly disappointed with your 'Editorial entitled Fear and Uncertainty Around Kashmir's Future published in August 17, 2019 issue of The Lancet (1). Upended by fundamental changes in Technology that have misguided or misinformed the general public, editorials and Journals, including Law and human Rights Advocacy Groups have become more depended with reference to misguided on online facts and analysis Lancet's editorial of Fear and Uncertainty is an exemplum of this misguidance. AAPI along with its counterpart in India and globally, denounces the Editorial not only as premature' but biased and reprehensible for lack of due diligence in research and consultation with proprieties or stakeholders llaGand MD gndhes MSRF Pdent Po nh DO inkhmacom Regienal Directers thuanMO d0 .aom W.Rang MD agightmalcom mVallapurdy, MD co H Bn, MD e a o ajendr thorMD ah on h MD a .om 0y Ma M .com mapa MD kpamagcom ngshGupt MD RvaMD While giving credence to your freedom of press, AAPI is very troubled that your entire editorial is founded on a putative study by Médecins Sans Frontiéres Contrary to the accepted scientific standards of The Lancet, you did not provide the reference to the study by the Médecins Sans Frontiéres. In the absence of such supporting citation, we have no choice other than believing that your statements on the mental health issues in Kashmir are unfounded and not scientifically valid. It is unfortunate that a leading medical journal publishes editorial on a very sensitive geopolitical issue without citing valid studies. i Pa MD lwah com maE MD dvinds Board of Trustees Oar mAr MD e d.com Amit Chakray MD aia H hing, MD .co pa Aaral MD apaagg Shat as@ co S MD doth@ m Aart aalMD aa hom Mukesh Nigam MD Giving the benefit of doubt that your editorial is honestly motivated by your love and compassion to the physical and mental health of the people of Kashmir, we fail to understand why you ignored the mass exodus of Kashmiri Pundits between 1985 and 1995 due to the militancy fueled in the valley by Pakistan (2). The lives of Kashmiri Pundits are also equally precious. Apart from the Kashmiri Pundits there are a number of other people around the world, who deserve the attention of The Lancet, perhaps more than the people of Jammu and Kashmir. sum PunjMD mpunjabihooo At KhMD Aet mm PrvnAria, M Prc Du aw @co Legal Advier HariLaE Administrative Director ija Kedai 600 Enterprise Dr., Ste. 108 P:(630) 990 2277 F: (630) 990 2281 www.aapiusa.org www.aapiconvention.org Oak Brook, Illinois 60523 Tax-ID: 38-2532505 PHYS American Association of Physicians of Indian Origin issues statement against Lancet’s article on Kashmir, says the Kashmir issue is “not important”
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Clothes, Dating, and Facebook: Sign in Search Support The Guardian UK edition Search jobs Dating Guardian Available for everyone, funded by readers Contribute Subscribe More Opinion Culture Lifestyle News Sport Business Economics Banking Money Markets Project Syndicate B2B Pay for FTSE 10oo bosses at five-year low after anger over pensions Executive pay and bonuses Editorially independent, open to everyone About one third of the companies have cut pension pay for new executive hires We chose a different approach- will you support it? Kalyeena Makortoff Banking correspondent Support The Guardian - @kalyeena Mon 19 Aug 2019 12.32 BST f most viewed Live Brexit: Boris Johnson says he is confident EU will shift backstop position-live news Threat to end freedom of movement overnight is reckless, say EU citizens Corbyn could have been the nation's saviour. But he's A Companies are grappling with new guidelines meant to bring executive pension payments in line with other staff. Photograph: Larry Downing/Reuters just too tribal Simon Jenkins Pay for FTSE 10o bosses fell to a five-year low last year and could drop further as firms bow to investor anger over bumper pension payouts Olaf Falafel wraps up victory in Edinburgh funniest joke award Median total pay for bosses of the UK's largest listed firms stood at £3.4m in 2018, compared with £4m a year earlier, according to Deloitte. It is the lowest level since 2014, when UK rules first required companies to report a single figure for chief executive pay. That year, median pay packages totalled £4.4m Revenge of the clothes moths: as numbers boom, can they be stopped? The report found that the median increase in base salary for FTSE 100 bosses stayed at only 2%, while nearly a third received no pay rise at all. Bonus payouts remained at similar levels of about 70% of the maximum allowed under each company's pay criteria. Median base salaries reached £868,600 while bonus payments - excluding long-term incentives - averaged £lm However, a notable shift has taken place for pay in lieu of pensions - cash sums of up to 50% of basic salary given to top bosses in lieu of pension contributions with about one third of FTSE 10o companies cutting pension pay for new executive hires. Companies are grappling with new guidelines meant to bring these cash payments to top executives into line with other staff. The Investment Association, which manages £7.7tn in assets of 250 members, has shamed firms for failing to cut payments to less than 25% of existing director's base pay as a first step. Business Today: sign up for a morning shot of financial news Read more Stephen Cahill, a vice-chairman at Deloitte, said: "We have seen many companies come forward as 'first movers' in response to new regulatory changes, with 29 companies reducing pensions for new hires. "Without a doubt, executive pensions have been the hottest topic of 2019 and we expect this to continue, with a growing focus on incumbent executives receiving the highest pension rates." Companies that have fallen foul of those guidelines over the past year include the travel firm Tui, the banking giant Standard Chartered, the supermarket chain Sainsbury's and the drinks company Diageo. The Lloyds Banking Group boss António Horta-Osório has been a lightning rod for criticism over excessive payouts and was summoned before MPs earlier this year for pocketing an extra £419,000 cash in lieu of pension, an additional payment of 33% of his £1.3m basic salary. Lloyds' ordinary staff receive employer pension contributions of only 13%. Deloitte said median pay for FTSE 100 chiefs has also been depressed by rules that bar CEOS from cashing in shares until long after they have left the company Email address Sign up Sign up to the dailyBusinessToday email or follow GuardianBusinesson Twitter at @BusinessDesk If the two trends continue, it could mean pay for FTSE 10o bosses dropping yet again Cahill said: "In the coming year we expect to see a further shift in reduced pensions and requirements for executives to hold shares post-leaving "Given current uncertainty in the UK business environment, shareholder pressure and regulatory controls should be balanced with the need to ensure that the UK is able to attract the calibre of talent that can deliver continued prosperity for businesses." Median pay for FTSE 100 CEOS since 2014 2018: £3.4m 2017: £4m 2016: £3.6m 2015: £4.2m 2014: £4.4m Source: Deloitte Topics Executive pay and bonuses FTSE Deloitte Financial sector/news f P in Reuse this content more on this story Sams Ondafone Bumper payout for Sainsbury's boss fuels investor anger at AGM Vodafone chiefs cut bonuses in effort to Nearly half of global wages received by top 10%, survey finds Lloyds staff happy with chief executive's £6.3m pay package, MPs told prevent investor revolt 10 Jul 2019 4 Jul 2019 4 Jul 2019 19 Jun 2019 Boss of UK's largest gambling firm GVC takes £150,000 pay cut Government has failed to Sainsbury's boss paid £3.9m despite collapse of Asda merger Morrisons boss hands back rein in 'extravagant' CEO pay, say MPs £600,000 in bonuses 13 Jun 2019 4 Jun 2019 29 May 2019 15 May 2019 Most popular Across The Guardian In Business 1 2 Live /Brexit: Boris Johnson says he is confident EU will shift backstop position-live news Premier League: 10 talking points from the weekend's action Threat to end freedom of movement overnight is reckless, say EU citizens 7 MDMA treatment for alcoholism could reduce relapse, study suggests Game of Thrones' Daniel Portman: 'People expect Podrick-that's not what they get' 3 Corbyn could have been the nation's saviour. But he's just too tribal Olaf Falafel wraps up victory in Edinburgh funniest joke award 9 Trump confirms he is considering attempt to buy Greenland Revenge of the clothes moths: as numbers boom, can they be stopped? 10 Greta Thunberg's attackers are morally bankrupt, but her deification isn't helpful Most shared Threat to end freedom of movement overnight is reckless, say EU citizens Most commented Corbyn could have been the nation's saviour But he's just too tribal Simon Jenkins Business Economics Banking Money Markets Project Syndicate B2B Opinion Culture Lifestyle News Sport |Support The Guardian All topics About us Advertise with us Sign up to our daily email Guardian Labs Contact us All writers Email address Sign up Complaints & corrections Modern Slavery Act Search jobs Available for everyone, funded by readers Digital newspaper archive Dating Contribute Subscribe SecureDrop Patrons Facebook Work for us Discount Codes Twitter Privacy policy Cookie policy Terms &conditions Help Back to top 2019 Guardian News &Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. "Progressive" media doing its not-so-discrete bootlicking duty!

"Progressive" media doing its not-so-discrete bootlicking duty!

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Crime, Empire, and Fake: rk. properly display the picture as Peter shook his hea Voice laced with disappointment. "Huh. I never th he'd really do that. "See, right there, you've made a judgment call," he said to an attoeg ngratulating him he didn't really ict replied. "You've got to see it like it is." "Funny you should say that, 'cause I was looking old photo of mine, and it sure did look similar Brock froze. > and as typicaly' > was starting to be hand and sadin a He tried to laugh it off and didn't succeed. In a slig strangled voice he said, "Okay, well. . . gotta get bac work." "You're trash, Brock." Parker's voice was deep, challenging. It almost cr out for Brock to take a swing at him. There was none Brant walking par p of course-he al space!" Bety nl he quavering protest or traces of uncertainty to whie Brock had become accustomed. "Excuse me? "Welcome to t Peter casually tossed a large yellow envelope onte Brock's desk. Eddie's eyes went wide when he saw the ad dress printed on the envelope's upper corner: Empire State University Department of Photography. "Your picture's a fake," Peter said with quiet conviction. Brock felt as if he were shrinking while Peter was growing in stature. "You grafted two images together. Digital shots you took at the scene of the crime, and a picture from two years ago that I took, where Spider fthat day's p to figure d he heard hor the latest wb dto see Petel my picture you Man Cntrance of money that he'd just got in te bank pres Yask in relected Ives to his forward c One of our favorite moments in novel form 🗑

One of our favorite moments in novel form 🗑

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Another One, Apparently, and England: THE MILWAUKEE JOURNAL A Eighty-seventh Year- 62 Pages Monday, July 21, 1969 Daily, per copy, 10 centa Latest Edition tt Moon Men Blast Off op Astronauts Begin Long Voyage Home The bug legged lower compartment of the lunar module, man began to build things and explore," said Flight Direc- By HARRY S. PEASE of The Journal Staff The crater that forced the fliers' last minute maneuver added further uncertainty Mission controllers here did their best to estimate the posi- Houston, Tex. - Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong mained behind as a monument to man's first visit. and Edwin Aldrin, jr., who had extended man's domain to the moon which served as a launching pad for the upper stage, re- tor Clifford E. Charlesworth The two astronauts' stay included 2 hours 13 minutes in It had balanced Armstrong and Aldrin on a column of which Armstrong's thick soled overshoes stirred the sooty tion of Eagle, the lunar module. They called upon Collins to Sunday, rocketed safely into the long voyage flame for more than 12 minutes during its active role Sun- lunar sand. Aldrin trod the surface about 1 hour and 43 search for it with the 28 power telescope in his navigating home just after 1 p.m. (Milwaukee time) Monday. They threaded their way through another maze of haz- day. minutes. sextant, but he could not see it. Later Armstrong and Aldrin used their rendezvous radar to ards in the upper stage of their lunar landing craft, firing ter the size of a football field and tiptoed to a landing in schoolboys in shallow water, made snapshots of one an- track Collins and the Columbia in the hope of determining the tried before on this mission. It drove them into a 50 mile the time wracked Sea of Tranquillity 40 seconds after 3:17 other like any other tourists, collected more than 50 landing point. They managed some 20 measurements of dis- They gamboled in the moon's one-sixth gravity like They dipped from orbit, strained upward'to clear a cra- for more than seven minutes an engine that had not been high orbit around the moon. After three and one-half hours they were scheduled to rejoin Michael Collins, who had orbited above them while landed," Armstrong radioed. they explored the lunar surface. And it will be about 11:55 p.m. when they call on their service propulsion engine for on the minor planet, human-kind's first venture on another one last mighty thrust to push them out ofunar orbit and onto a course that leads to the earth. tance as Columbia passed over, and the figures were fed into a computer. The machine produced another approximation of the LM's position. Officials of the national aeronautics and space administra- pounds of priceless soil and rocks and performed their in- p.m. "Houston, Tranquillity base here. The Eagle has tricate technical tasks with consummate skill. The rendezvous promised to be a little more tricky than The moment marked the beginning of a 211½ hour stay any yet attempted. Armstrong and Aldrin did not know quite where they were on the face of the moon. For some reason still unexplained, tion doubted that the uncertainty represented any physical they began their descent about four miles too far west, cosmic body. "I think it's the greatest thing that has been done since Turn to page A, col. 1 Luna Data Hints That It Landed One Small Step for Man... More on Apollo on moon, Page D, including text of Nixon's conversation. Transcripts of conversations of astronauts during descent of lunar module and John Glenn, ir., reflects on meaning of moon s u c cess, Page D. Armstrong's descent from the LM to the moon, Page A. Science fiction writer says the universe imposes some limits on space travel, Page B. Jodrell Bank, England-AP- Russia Monday landed Luna 15 on the moon 500 miles from where America's Apollo astro- nauts were preparing to take off on their journey back to earth, Jodrell Bank observa- tory reported. However, it apparently plunged to the surface of the moon at such high speed it could have been severely dam- aged. The tracking facility said Luna 15 was traveling around 300 miles an hour when it hit. Signals picked up at the giant radio telescope here in- dicated that after four days of moon orbit the unmanned probe landed on the moon's Sea of Crises, which is north- east and over mountains from the Apollo site on the Sea of Moon suits are expensive items, Page D. Reaction around the world is re- Armstrong's first words on moon recall other famous "first sounding, Page C. words" in history, Page D. Three Wisconsin acientists will be among those studying sam- ples from moon, Page C. James Reston writes that moon landing could be step toward a better earth, Page 2 Scientists expect a black market in fake moon dust, Page C. How Milwaukeeans reacted. Page 1, Part 2 Astronauts' wives use an array of adjectives to express their feelings, Page D, Armstrong's sister, who lives in Menomonee Falls, says she knew he was excited, Page 2, Part 2 Television pictures hardly need- ed embellishment, Page D. Astronaut families fit no stereo type. Page 6, part 2 Astronaut Frank Borman reads at White House religious service before President Nix- on talks on on trip, Local sidelights c Page 10, Part 2 on mo telephone to men Budget Warning My grandparents saved newspapers from parts of the 60s. Here's one from the moon landing 50 years ago today.

My grandparents saved newspapers from parts of the 60s. Here's one from the moon landing 50 years ago today.

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