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fandom: 2019’s Top Live-Action TV So many apocalypses, so little time. Good Omens Druck Game of Thrones +9 SKAM France The Umbrella Academy Stranger Things +2 SKAM Italia +5 Supernatural −7 Andi Mack +1 The 100 −6 Killing Eve  SKAM España Supergirl −8 Brooklyn Nine-Nine −11 Riverdale −13 Shadowhunters −10 Euphoria SKAM Doctor Who −12 The Good Place −11 SKAM Netherlands The Magicians Gentleman Jack Lucifer wtFOCK Gotham −11 Titans Roswell, New Mexico Anne with an E SKAM Austin Legends of Tomorrow −11 Outlander Legacies Sherlock −20 Peaky Blinders The Untamed One Day at a Time −8 Sex Education Derry Girls The Flash −19 The Society EastEnders Hannibal E L I T Ǝ Black Mirror Merlin The Office Chilling Adventures of Sabrina It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia The Walking Dead −30The number in italics indicates how many spots a title moved up or down from the previous year. Bolded titles weren’t on the list last year.: tumblr Year in Review Live-Action TV- 2019 2019 fandom: 2019’s Top Live-Action TV So many apocalypses, so little time. Good Omens Druck Game of Thrones +9 SKAM France The Umbrella Academy Stranger Things +2 SKAM Italia +5 Supernatural −7 Andi Mack +1 The 100 −6 Killing Eve  SKAM España Supergirl −8 Brooklyn Nine-Nine −11 Riverdale −13 Shadowhunters −10 Euphoria SKAM Doctor Who −12 The Good Place −11 SKAM Netherlands The Magicians Gentleman Jack Lucifer wtFOCK Gotham −11 Titans Roswell, New Mexico Anne with an E SKAM Austin Legends of Tomorrow −11 Outlander Legacies Sherlock −20 Peaky Blinders The Untamed One Day at a Time −8 Sex Education Derry Girls The Flash −19 The Society EastEnders Hannibal E L I T Ǝ Black Mirror Merlin The Office Chilling Adventures of Sabrina It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia The Walking Dead −30The number in italics indicates how many spots a title moved up or down from the previous year. Bolded titles weren’t on the list last year.
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Some girl just dropped this resume off at my work: Highlights Always willing to make a rain Laughs at medioore jokers . I play s different instrument . Turned my recorder into a fully functional obacco po Very optimistic when hungover Friendship bracelets Can drive a stick shift I got bars Iget along with overy dog rve met and at a 73% oftro people rve moc. * Downsides Will be late nearly every day with iterally no excuse Will spook the customers with I have ADHD, but don't worry, I buy other peoples adderall Allergic to mushrooms (still willing to trip them) .I have been the cause of 13 car accidents (that I know ofy . Kind of bad at doing accents, usually just comes off as disrespecttuil Contributions Inventor Sauce Boss . A safe space and secure area for your sauces in the car. For a spill and worry free drive home . Part the Red Sea .The thick, untamed, poofy, distressed mane usually accompanied by a Mo Moses Tampons Coined the phrase "jean skirt hair mon in a floor length jean skirt Coined the term *Escobars When someone snorts a mix of cocaine and Xanax .Not recommended Education Bradford Elementary School Made it to round 1 of the 6th grade spelling bee Mullen High School 2008-2012 . Graduated 1st place in worst attendance in class of 2012 . Dia though Had an impact on the student handbook because I rode a donkey to schook of Northem Colorado 2012-201 Survived Greeley Majored in like 7 different things so I'm well rounded University of the Virgin Isiands 2015-2017 Majored in Political Science and English- Creative Whiting School blew away in Hurricane Irma School cut major Jobs I Didnt Quit In Less Than 3 Weeks Or Get Fired From Colorado Saddlery 2012-Present I make everyone feel good about themselves in the company because I ne ver know what's going on there They don't pay me anymore but I still show up from time to time . Laboniously diverse in that bitch . I programmed their Alexa to play the world's national anthems at noon ever y day - They pretty much can't fire me thered e Intenship in Haiti 2016 Partially fluent in Haitian Creole, which I speak in when dicey fools speak to me at the bar and I want them to leave 4ever Spent about a year total in Hait I had Zika, so don't worry, I won't be having children any time soono Harley Davidson-St. Thomas . I folded shits, talked to drunk people, then I sold said shits to said drunk p eople I'm very impressive at folding shirts Reason(s) I Dipped: I wanted to get off the islandl over Christmas I kept accidentally throwing piles of clothes onto the owner's chihuahua a d I felt really guilty about ito They said I quit better than any other employee they've had, that was co sort of Local Color Clothing Boutique More folding, but the clothes were more expensive) Some girl just dropped this resume off at my work
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virulentblog: plaid-flannel: Seen in the window at Gulf of Maine Books in Brunswick, Maine. Photo: Bill Roorbach Except America wasn’t an endless expanse of forest with no certain borders. At least not while human beings inhabited it. The idea that native peoples did not cultivate or shape our land and that we had no borders is white propaganda meant to dehumanize and de-legitimize native peoples. This illustration here show Apalachee people using slash and burn methods for agriculture. Fires were set regularly to intention burn down forests and plains. Why would we do this? Well because an unregulated forest isn’t that great for people, actually. We set fires to destroy new forest growth and undergrowth, and to remove trees, allowing for easier game hunting, nutrient enriched soil, and better growth rates for crops and herbs we used in food and medicine. Pre-Colonial New England, where my tribe the Abenaki are from, looked more like an extensive meadow or savannah with trees growing in pockets and groves. Enough woodland to support birds, deer, and moose, but not too much to make hunting difficult. We carefully shaped the land around us to suit our needs as a thriving and successful people. Slash and burn agriculture was practiced virtually everywhere in the new world, from the pacific coast to chesapeake bay, from panama to quebec. It was a highly successful way of revitalizing the land and promoting crop growth, as well as preventing massive forest fires that thrive in unregulated forests. Berries were the major source of fruit for my tribe, and we needed to burn the undergrowth so they could grow. That changed when white people invaded, and brought with them disease. In my tribe, up to 9 in 10 people died. 90% of our people perished not from violence starvation, but from disease. Entire villages would be decimated, struck down by small pox. Suddenly, we couldn’t care for the land anymore. There weren’t enough of us to maintain a vast, carefully structured ecological system like we had for thousands of years. We didn’t have the numbers, or strength. So the trees grew back and unregulated. We couldn’t set fires anymore, and we couldn’t cultivate the land. And white people would make certain we never could again. Timber, after all, was the most important export from New England.  Endless trees and untamed wilderness is a nice fantasy. But it’s a very white fantasy, one that erases the history of my people and of my land. One that paints native peoples are merely parasites leeching off the land, not masters of the earth who new the right balance of hunting and agriculture. It robs us of our agency as people, and takes our accomplishments from us. Moreover, it implies that only white people ever discovered the power to shape the world around them, and that mere brown people can’t possibly have had anything to do with changing our environment. Don’t bring back untamed wilderness. Bring back my fire setters, my tree sappers, my farmers and my fishers. Bring back my people who were here first.  Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Native_American_use_of_fire#Role_of_fire_by_natives https://www.fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/fsbdev3_000385.pdf http://www.sidalc.net/repdoc/A11604i/A11604i.pdf For those curious I recommend reading Changes in the Land: Indians, Colonists and the Ecology of New England.https://books.google.com/books/about/Changes_in_the_Land.html?id=AHclmuykdBQCprintsec=frontcoversource=kp_read_button#v=onepageqf=false : MAKE AMERICA AN ENDLESS EXPANSE OF OLD-GROWTH FOREST WITH NO CERTAIN BORDERS AGAIN virulentblog: plaid-flannel: Seen in the window at Gulf of Maine Books in Brunswick, Maine. Photo: Bill Roorbach Except America wasn’t an endless expanse of forest with no certain borders. At least not while human beings inhabited it. The idea that native peoples did not cultivate or shape our land and that we had no borders is white propaganda meant to dehumanize and de-legitimize native peoples. This illustration here show Apalachee people using slash and burn methods for agriculture. Fires were set regularly to intention burn down forests and plains. Why would we do this? Well because an unregulated forest isn’t that great for people, actually. We set fires to destroy new forest growth and undergrowth, and to remove trees, allowing for easier game hunting, nutrient enriched soil, and better growth rates for crops and herbs we used in food and medicine. Pre-Colonial New England, where my tribe the Abenaki are from, looked more like an extensive meadow or savannah with trees growing in pockets and groves. Enough woodland to support birds, deer, and moose, but not too much to make hunting difficult. We carefully shaped the land around us to suit our needs as a thriving and successful people. Slash and burn agriculture was practiced virtually everywhere in the new world, from the pacific coast to chesapeake bay, from panama to quebec. It was a highly successful way of revitalizing the land and promoting crop growth, as well as preventing massive forest fires that thrive in unregulated forests. Berries were the major source of fruit for my tribe, and we needed to burn the undergrowth so they could grow. That changed when white people invaded, and brought with them disease. In my tribe, up to 9 in 10 people died. 90% of our people perished not from violence starvation, but from disease. Entire villages would be decimated, struck down by small pox. Suddenly, we couldn’t care for the land anymore. There weren’t enough of us to maintain a vast, carefully structured ecological system like we had for thousands of years. We didn’t have the numbers, or strength. So the trees grew back and unregulated. We couldn’t set fires anymore, and we couldn’t cultivate the land. And white people would make certain we never could again. Timber, after all, was the most important export from New England.  Endless trees and untamed wilderness is a nice fantasy. But it’s a very white fantasy, one that erases the history of my people and of my land. One that paints native peoples are merely parasites leeching off the land, not masters of the earth who new the right balance of hunting and agriculture. It robs us of our agency as people, and takes our accomplishments from us. Moreover, it implies that only white people ever discovered the power to shape the world around them, and that mere brown people can’t possibly have had anything to do with changing our environment. Don’t bring back untamed wilderness. Bring back my fire setters, my tree sappers, my farmers and my fishers. Bring back my people who were here first.  Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Native_American_use_of_fire#Role_of_fire_by_natives https://www.fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/fsbdev3_000385.pdf http://www.sidalc.net/repdoc/A11604i/A11604i.pdf For those curious I recommend reading Changes in the Land: Indians, Colonists and the Ecology of New England.https://books.google.com/books/about/Changes_in_the_Land.html?id=AHclmuykdBQCprintsec=frontcoversource=kp_read_button#v=onepageqf=false

virulentblog: plaid-flannel: Seen in the window at Gulf of Maine Books in Brunswick, Maine. Photo: Bill Roorbach Except America wasn’t a...

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the-absolute-funniest-posts: casieveggies: Best Friends  Born in Africa to French wildlife photographer parents, Tippi Degré had a most unusual childhood. The young girl grew up in the African desert and developed an uncommon bond with many untamed animals including a 28-year old African elephant named Abu, a leopard nicknamed JB, lion cubs, giraffes, an Ostrich, a mongoose, crocodiles, a baby zebra, a cheetah, giant bullfrogs, and even a snake. Africa was her home for many years and Tippi became friends with the ferocious animals and tribespeople of Namibia. As a young child, the French girl said, “I don’t have friends here. Because I never see children. So the animals are my friends.” real life wild thornberrys My lovely followers, please follow this blog immediately!: the-absolute-funniest-posts: casieveggies: Best Friends  Born in Africa to French wildlife photographer parents, Tippi Degré had a most unusual childhood. The young girl grew up in the African desert and developed an uncommon bond with many untamed animals including a 28-year old African elephant named Abu, a leopard nicknamed JB, lion cubs, giraffes, an Ostrich, a mongoose, crocodiles, a baby zebra, a cheetah, giant bullfrogs, and even a snake. Africa was her home for many years and Tippi became friends with the ferocious animals and tribespeople of Namibia. As a young child, the French girl said, “I don’t have friends here. Because I never see children. So the animals are my friends.” real life wild thornberrys My lovely followers, please follow this blog immediately!

the-absolute-funniest-posts: casieveggies: Best Friends  Born in Africa to French wildlife photographer parents, Tippi Degré had a most...

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