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Love, Tumblr, and Weird: Purple Primary Silver Secondary Black Tertiary Blue primary black primary green secondary silver tertiary Light Blue Primary Orange Secondary Teal Tertiary Red secondary gold tertiary? whats this second, darker blue where the secondary color should go? why are the sec- ondary accents where the tertiary colors should be? Fine sometimes, but almost com- pleterly erases the gold This model puts its secondary colors in places where it's tertiary should go, creating a sense of unbalanced blue/red, and far less gold or yellow than it should have. This model accomplishes what the paris model set out to do- they put black on hips (where other model's secondary (and sometimes tertiary) color goes) This gives Houston a larger primary-to-sec- ondary color ratio. Worth noting that most skins for London are actu Same breakdown as London ally bright blue primary, teal secondary, and orange accents. It could be argued that orange is stll teri tary in this model, but thats almost more damning for paris. Where is their red arm? Why, again, is his shitty hoody red? because gold doesnt work? shouldnt it have been blue instead? and then have the hip pad underneath and arm both be red? be argued tha ost more damn his ody red? becauS nstead? aered? a much more pronounced gold color from a team without any gold even in their logo OMEGALUL Special callout for the dragon skin: They decided to use their primary red color in the legs where every other team puts their tertiary color... very interesting choice *where did the two different blues go from the doomfist model? here theres only one- why is gold so bronze compared to doomfist? Why do they try to make the skin red/blue split even here but more blue on doomfist? only one Look at that sweet gold shine, paris... whatchu doin sweetie P A RIS ETERNAL overwatchleaguepride: Lets talk about Paris……beyond the uninspired color choice. Let’s ignore that paris and DC (and, ugh, fineeee nyxl) have the same-ish colors. There’s some big things wrong here, at least in my opinion:1. On doomfist’s skin, Paris attempts a unique choice that only nyxl, houston, and seoul have done. They try to push the primary color. Look at the Houston doomfist skin vs the London and Glads one. While all technically have three colors, Houston looks overwhelmingly more like it’s primary black color, and then green, and then if you really look, you can see the silver tertiary color. Paris attempts this- but does one weird thing: they introduce a fourth color. Where the inside of his arm should be red, they put a second, darker blue. :/ hmmm2. In contrast to that, on Widow, they seem to give up on the idea of a more dominant blue color and don’t follow the nyxl/houston/seoul model of more primary color and less secondary. Here, they do what all the other teams do and put primary on body, secondary on legs, and accent on armor bits and leggy criss-cross things. Exceeeeept…. they dont have their gold accents non the hips! Why, if they’re not going to do what nyxl/houston/seoul do and push the primary? All it servers to do is make the red/blue size difference even more even! Also- their gold on her is… bronze looking. Much much darker than the gold on doomfist or on the other team. Weird. 3. The logo. Hoo boy that logo. Why do they have that terrible contrast? Why is the largest, brightest piece of it the yellow if they’re going a) use gold and b) hide the gold on their skins anyway? Why push the blue primary on their logo and on some skins but not on other skins? …anyway- I’m gonna assume this is super boring to most people, but if anyone likes design, I’d love to hear what you think!
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Eagle, Skull, and One: One very interesting thing I discovered is that the symbol of AC is really an eagle skull. I don´t know if you knew that.

One very interesting thing I discovered is that the symbol of AC is really an eagle skull. I don´t know if you knew that.

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Apparently, Baked, and Beautiful: the-real-ted-cruz: scp2008: prospitanmutie: donesparce: youmightbeamisogynist: thisandthathistoryblog: hjuliana: dancingspirals: ironychan: hungrylikethewolfie: dduane: wine-loving-vagabond: A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting) (sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful. I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern. Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down. Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking. If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread. Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty. Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic. ALL OF THIS IS SO COOL I found something too awesome not share with you!  I’m completely fascinated by the history of food, could I choose a similar topic for my Third Year Dissertation? Who knows, but it is very interesting all the same! Bread fraud us actually where the concept of a bakers dozen came from. Undersized rolls/loaves/whatever were added to the dozen purchased to ensure that the total weight evened out so the baker couldn’t be punished for shorting someone. [wants to talk about bread fraud laws and punishments] [holds it in] bread police Reblogging this tasty Bread History for 2016! @the-real-ted-cruz loafs were too valuable  i love lore

the-real-ted-cruz: scp2008: prospitanmutie: donesparce: youmightbeamisogynist: thisandthathistoryblog: hjuliana: dancingspirals: iro...

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Apparently, Baked, and Beautiful: wine-loving-vagabond A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeil, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud (via Ridiculously Interesting) dduane (sigh) I've seen these before, but this one's particularly beautiful. hungrylikethewolfie I feel like I'm supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that's been preserved for thousands of years, and don't get me wrong, that's hella cool. But honestly, I'm mostly struck by the unexpected news that "bread fraud" was apparently once a serious concem. ironychan Bread Fraud was a huge thing, Bread was provided to the Roman people by the govermment bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and wouid add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down. dancingspirals Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to dentify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdie cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. it's a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever traudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn't easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hoie, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stoien dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of ruies and records of people being shifty Check out Fabulous Feasts. Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Peiner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400 Plus the color plates are fantastic hjuliana ALL OF THIS IS SO COOL thisandthathistoryblog l found som ething too awesome not share with you! I'm completely fascinated by the history of food, could I choose a similar topic for my Third Year Dissertation? Who knows, but it is very interesting all the same! youmightbeamisogynist fraud us actually where the concept of a bakers dozen came from Undersized rolis/loaves/whatever were added to the dozen purchased to ensure that the total weight evened out so the baker couldn't be punished for shorting someone. donesparce wants to talk about bread fraud laws and punishments holds it inj bread police Bread Police! Open up!

Bread Police! Open up!

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Apple, Doctor, and Drunk: The Vegetative Patient Who Could Talk To Doctors BBC sixpenceee: my-hardcore-kittens: indie—cat: rainamermaid: memewhore: sean3116: sixpenceee: As someone who wants to study the human consciousness I found this very interesting. Scott Routley was a “vegetable”. A car accident seriously injured both sides of his brain, and for 12 years, he was completely unresponsive. Unable to speak or track people with his eyes, it seemed that Routley was unaware of his surroundings, and doctors assumed he was lost in limbo. They were wrong. In 2012, Professor Adrian Owen decided to run tests on comatose patients like Scott Routley. Curious if some “vegetables” were actually conscious, Owen put Routley in an fMRI and told him to imagine walking through his home. Suddenly, the brain scan showed activity. Routley not only heard Owen, he was responding. Next, the two worked out a code. Owen asked a series of “yes or no” questions, and if the answer was “yes,” Routley thought about walking around his house. If the answer was “no,” Routley thought about playing tennis. These different actions showed activity different parts of the brain. Owen started off with easy questions like, “Is the sky blue?” However, they changed medical science when Owen asked, “Are you in pain?” and Routley answered, “No.” It was the first time a comatose patient with serious brain damage had let doctors know about his condition. While Scott Routley is still trapped in his body, he finally has a way to reach out to the people around him. This finding has huge implications. SOURCE HOLY STEAMING SHITFUCKS WHY IS EVERYONE NOT LOSING THEIR SHIT ABOUT THIS What a fucking nightmare, just kill me. I know a girl who was hit by a drunk driver and in that state for a year. When she woke up the first thing she did was tell off the doctor who tried to convince her mom to pull the plug. She heard *everything* while being called brain dead. Omg^ undefined
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Beautiful, Boobies, and Crime: nationalshitpostingagency tumbl Follow willoftzeentch-deactivated20160 factfiend Fun fact: According to Greek legend there was a famous prostitute who managed to avoid a death sentence by showing the judges her boobs and arguing that it would be a crime against the Gods to destroy something so beautiful Before you ask, yes there are paintings of this. And yes, they're amazing Read more karlosmadera I love history fyeahteamgents Role models tho we-all-eat-death donzs The gay one suzie-guru No, but this is one of my absolute favorite bits of history! The courtesan named was named Phryne and she was indeed a renowned beauty, and was indeed was put on trial for a capital crime. And yes, the sum of her defense consisted of her stripping in court (helped by her lover/defendant) and asking the jury (all males) if they were prepared to destroy this But this is actually a very interesting case of Values Dissonance - the capital crime she was accused of was blasphemy. In Ancient Greek society, exceptional beauty was a sign of favor from the gods, and they took the idea that beauty indicated goodness with great seriousness. They even called their nobles Kaloi k'Agathoi, "the Beautiful and the Good So by showing off her great physical beauty, Phryne was being very clever indeed, her argument essentially being "How could I possibly commit blasphemy if the gods have given me this body?" God, I adore history nationalshitpostingagency "If these tits are legit, you must acquit." Source:factfiend 705,645 notes I plead not guilty by reason of boobies, your honor.
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