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Alive, Bad, and Definitely: Kayla, Aug 15, 9:06 AM PDT Hello Jacob, Thank you for reaching out to Lush Cosmetics! It is always wonderful to hear from customers - humans and vampires alike! I apologize if our use of garlic in the Cosmetic Warrior face mask gives you the wrong impression. We use garlic for its deep cleansing nature to help break down dirt and oil on the skin, leaving you feeling fresh. I completely understand it's not the ingredient most vampires should be reaching for We've always been an inclusive company and believe we should celebrate our differences! Even though vampires are by nature, dead, that doesn't mean their skin needs to reflect that! Perhaps they'd love our Scared Truth face mask which is made with fresh papaya to help get r skin glowing and looking well, alive!We even add in honey, and soya yogurt to soften and hydrate the skin. Just because you are immortal, doesn't mean you should have skin that reflects your actual age! While we may not see eye to eye with your diet, we can definitely help keep your skin from sucking (get it?). We know that vampires can sometimes get a bad reputation and that's stressful. Why not relax with one of our Twilight bath bombs? It is made with vampire friendly lavender essential oil and filled with sparkles! Vampires like sparkles, right? Kind regards, Your friends at Lush another-walter: okay so, me and a friend were talking about lush and they saw that one of their facemasks contained garlic as the main ingredient and we started to wonder if lush had like, something against vampires or something so i sent an email to lush askin if they r pro-vampire and they actually replied back lmao

another-walter: okay so, me and a friend were talking about lush and they saw that one of their facemasks contained garlic as the main ing...

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Drunk, Memes, and New York: A Mexican restaurant called "Amigos Taqueria Y Tequila" in Westerly, Rhode lsland is selling T-whirts calling for the murder of our president. In a restaurant, to "86" something is to get rid of it, when talking about humans, its murder. The phone number at the restaurant is 401-315-5800. 886 86 86 45 86 45 Regardless of whether it was the first to coin the phrase, the restaurant business in the 1930s was one of the main incubators for its usage and development. Believed to be slang for the word “nix,” it was initially used as a way of saying that the kitchen was out of something, as revealed in Walter Winchell’s 1933 newspaper column that featured a “glossary of soda-fountain lingo” used in restaurants during that time. It later evolved into a code that restaurants and bars used when they wanted to cut someone off, because they were either rude, broke, or drunk, as in “86 that chump at the end of the bar.” This possible origin stems from the Prohibition era at a bar called Chumley’s located at 86 Bedford Street in New York City. To survive, many speakeasies had the police on somewhat of a payroll so that they might be warned of a raid. In the case of Chumley’s, it is said that police would call and tell the bartender to 86 his customers, which meant that 1) a raid was about to happen and 2) that they should all exit via the 86 Bedford door while the police would approach at the entrance on Pamela Court. Another plausible explanation for the saying is brought you by the U.S. Navy’s Allowance Type (AT) coding system that was used to identify and classify the status of inventory. The code AT-6 was assigned to inventory that was designated for disposal, specifically after World War II as the Navy decommissioned many of its warships and went through the process of cleaning out its storerooms where they kept spare parts. During this process, any parts that were labeled AT-6 were considered trash and thrown out. It is easy to see phonetically how this could result in the term “86” and the idea of throwing something away to become synonymous.

Regardless of whether it was the first to coin the phrase, the restaurant business in the 1930s was one of the main incubators for its usage...

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