She Doing
She Doing

She Doing

She Do
She Do

She Do

Yass Queen
Yass Queen

Yass Queen

Bitching
Bitching

Bitching

M Yass
M Yass

M Yass

over
over

over

to-the-left
to-the-left

to-the-left

lil bitch
 lil bitch

lil bitch

pull over
 pull over

pull over

when you wake up
 when you wake up

when you wake up

πŸ”₯ | Latest

Bad, Family, and God: Justino Mora @JustinoMora1 Hector Barajas, a U.S. veteran, was deported in 2004. Today, our dear friend Hector won his battle against the U.S. government and will be allowed to return home, become a U.S. citizen, and reunite with his family! Hector will be sworn in as a citizen on April 13th in San Diego. Yass!! πŸ’œπŸ™ŒπŸ½πŸ˜Š Via The San Diego Union-Tribune: "Hector Barajas, who became the face and voice of deported veterans after his own deportation, will be allowed to return to the place he considers home and become a U.S. citizen. Barajas burst into joyous tears seated on a couch Thursday afternoon in front of a large American flag as he read a document informing him that he would be sworn in as a citizen on April 13 in San Diego. β€œFourteen years, man,” Hector said, his voice cracking. β€œOh my God, this is great. Hallelujah! Hallelujah!”. β€œI’m coming home, mom!” he added. Barajas was honorably discharged from the Army in 2001 but struggled readjusting to civilian life. He took a plea deal for a charge of shooting at an occupied car in 2002. Because of that conviction, the government took away his green card, and he was deported in 2004 after he finished a prison sentence. β€œI made bad decisions,” Barajas-Varela told the Union-Tribune last year about that time in his life. β€œI put myself in that situation... I wouldn’t put myself in that situation again.” Barajas founded the Deported Veterans Support House, known to many as β€œthe Bunker,” in 2013 to support deportees in Tijuana. He became a leader in a push for legislative changes to help U.S. military veterans who had not become citizens avoid deportation and to bring back those who were already removed. He was born in Mexico but raised in Los Angeles from age seven. Since he had a green card, he was able to serve in the Army and was part of the 82nd Airborne Division from 1995 to 2001. At the time, he thought he’d automatically become a citizen, but that was not the case. Members of the military are allowed to apply for citizenship with no waiting period. They still have to fill out the paperwork and pass the tests. Noncitizens who serve in the military are still at risk for deportation if they commit crimes that can cause the U.S. to revoke their green cards."
Bad, Family, and God: Justino Mora
 @JustinoMora1
 Hector Barajas, a U.S. veteran, was
 deported in 2004. Today, our dear friend
 Hector won his battle against the U.S.
 government and will be allowed to return
 home, become a U.S. citizen, and reunite
 with his family!
 Hector will be sworn in as a citizen on
 April 13th in San Diego.
Yass!! πŸ’œπŸ™ŒπŸ½πŸ˜Š Via The San Diego Union-Tribune: "Hector Barajas, who became the face and voice of deported veterans after his own deportation, will be allowed to return to the place he considers home and become a U.S. citizen. Barajas burst into joyous tears seated on a couch Thursday afternoon in front of a large American flag as he read a document informing him that he would be sworn in as a citizen on April 13 in San Diego. β€œFourteen years, man,” Hector said, his voice cracking. β€œOh my God, this is great. Hallelujah! Hallelujah!”. β€œI’m coming home, mom!” he added. Barajas was honorably discharged from the Army in 2001 but struggled readjusting to civilian life. He took a plea deal for a charge of shooting at an occupied car in 2002. Because of that conviction, the government took away his green card, and he was deported in 2004 after he finished a prison sentence. β€œI made bad decisions,” Barajas-Varela told the Union-Tribune last year about that time in his life. β€œI put myself in that situation... I wouldn’t put myself in that situation again.” Barajas founded the Deported Veterans Support House, known to many as β€œthe Bunker,” in 2013 to support deportees in Tijuana. He became a leader in a push for legislative changes to help U.S. military veterans who had not become citizens avoid deportation and to bring back those who were already removed. He was born in Mexico but raised in Los Angeles from age seven. Since he had a green card, he was able to serve in the Army and was part of the 82nd Airborne Division from 1995 to 2001. At the time, he thought he’d automatically become a citizen, but that was not the case. Members of the military are allowed to apply for citizenship with no waiting period. They still have to fill out the paperwork and pass the tests. Noncitizens who serve in the military are still at risk for deportation if they commit crimes that can cause the U.S. to revoke their green cards."

Yass!! πŸ’œπŸ™ŒπŸ½πŸ˜Š Via The San Diego Union-Tribune: "Hector Barajas, who became the face and voice of deported veterans after his own deportation, ...

Donald Trump, Memes, and Saw: AFRICAN REFUGEE BECOMES MONTANA'S FIRST BLACK MAYOR IN MORE THAN A CENTURY BLACK ENTERPRISE.coM Yass! πŸ™ŒπŸ½πŸ‘πŸ½βœŠπŸΎ ProtectTPS . Via @undocublack Repost @blackenterprise: WilmotCollins, 54, moved to Montana 28 years ago when he fled Liberia in 1990 during the country’s first civil war. He told The Globe and Mail that during the war, frequently the only thing to eat was butter mixed with mayonnaise. Along with his wife and five relatives, they crammed themselves into a single room near the American Embassy hoping it would serve as a safe haven as fighting raged across the city. Collins and his wife, Maddie, fled Liberia to Ghana, the Ivory Coast and finally, the United States.β € β € President Donald Trump’s attack on immigrants around the country is in full swing. In a state whose African American population is less than 1%, Montana resident Wilmot Collins, a former civil war refugee from Liberia who was fairly new to the political scene, saw an opening. He seized the opportunity to counter the president’s narrative by sharing his own story.β € β € β€œWhen people can relate to the real deal, they’re wide-eyed, because all they’ve heard is what comes out of our leadership,” he told The Globe and Mail. β€œThere’s no way when people hear your stories and struggles they can’t identify with you.”
Donald Trump, Memes, and Saw: AFRICAN REFUGEE BECOMES
 MONTANA'S FIRST BLACK
 MAYOR IN MORE THAN A
 CENTURY
 BLACK
 ENTERPRISE.coM
Yass! πŸ™ŒπŸ½πŸ‘πŸ½βœŠπŸΎ ProtectTPS . Via @undocublack Repost @blackenterprise: WilmotCollins, 54, moved to Montana 28 years ago when he fled Liberia in 1990 during the country’s first civil war. He told The Globe and Mail that during the war, frequently the only thing to eat was butter mixed with mayonnaise. Along with his wife and five relatives, they crammed themselves into a single room near the American Embassy hoping it would serve as a safe haven as fighting raged across the city. Collins and his wife, Maddie, fled Liberia to Ghana, the Ivory Coast and finally, the United States.β € β € President Donald Trump’s attack on immigrants around the country is in full swing. In a state whose African American population is less than 1%, Montana resident Wilmot Collins, a former civil war refugee from Liberia who was fairly new to the political scene, saw an opening. He seized the opportunity to counter the president’s narrative by sharing his own story.β € β € β€œWhen people can relate to the real deal, they’re wide-eyed, because all they’ve heard is what comes out of our leadership,” he told The Globe and Mail. β€œThere’s no way when people hear your stories and struggles they can’t identify with you.”

Yass! πŸ™ŒπŸ½πŸ‘πŸ½βœŠπŸΎ ProtectTPS . Via @undocublack Repost @blackenterprise: WilmotCollins, 54, moved to Montana 28 years ago when he fled Liberia in...

Basketball, Energy, and Girls: Muhammad Lila @MuhammadLila Remember the Afghan Girl's robotics team that was initially denied entry to the US? They just won the biggest robotics festival in Europe KOOL ck in Yass!! β€οΈπŸ’πŸ½β€β™€οΈπŸ€– girlpower πŸ‘πŸ½ "Afghanistan’s Girl Robotics Team just won the Entrepreneur Challenge at Europe’s largest robotics festival, the Robotex festival in Tallinn, Estonia. At Robotex, the team faced off against 3700 other competitors and 1600 robots in a series of competitions, including robot basketball games, races, and mazes. The Entrepreneurial Challenge, in its inaugural year at the competition, requires competitors to build a robot, design marketing flyers, and present a sales pitch to a team of judges. The winning robot, presented by three members of the Afghan team, used solar energy to work on small-scale farms, the New York Times reported And that’s not the first international robotics award the twelve girls from Herat have bagged. In July, they took home a silver medal for courage in the FIRST Global Challenge in Washington, D.C. For any group of teenagers, those would be an impressive set of achievements, but these six girls come from a country where two-thirds of girls never make it to school at all, according to Human Rights Watch." VIA Forbes girlsintech stem tech NoMuslimBan leanin woc
Basketball, Energy, and Girls: Muhammad Lila
 @MuhammadLila
 Remember the Afghan Girl's robotics
 team that was initially denied entry to
 the US? They just won the biggest
 robotics festival in Europe
 KOOL
 ck in
Yass!! β€οΈπŸ’πŸ½β€β™€οΈπŸ€– girlpower πŸ‘πŸ½ "Afghanistan’s Girl Robotics Team just won the Entrepreneur Challenge at Europe’s largest robotics festival, the Robotex festival in Tallinn, Estonia. At Robotex, the team faced off against 3700 other competitors and 1600 robots in a series of competitions, including robot basketball games, races, and mazes. The Entrepreneurial Challenge, in its inaugural year at the competition, requires competitors to build a robot, design marketing flyers, and present a sales pitch to a team of judges. The winning robot, presented by three members of the Afghan team, used solar energy to work on small-scale farms, the New York Times reported And that’s not the first international robotics award the twelve girls from Herat have bagged. In July, they took home a silver medal for courage in the FIRST Global Challenge in Washington, D.C. For any group of teenagers, those would be an impressive set of achievements, but these six girls come from a country where two-thirds of girls never make it to school at all, according to Human Rights Watch." VIA Forbes girlsintech stem tech NoMuslimBan leanin woc

Yass!! β€οΈπŸ’πŸ½β€β™€οΈπŸ€– girlpower πŸ‘πŸ½ "Afghanistan’s Girl Robotics Team just won the Entrepreneur Challenge at Europe’s largest robotics festival, th...